foolery vs indulgence what difference

what is difference between foolery and indulgence

English

Etymology

From Middle English foleri, ffollery, equivalent to fool +‎ -ery.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfuːləɹi/

Noun

foolery (countable and uncountable, plural fooleries)

  1. Foolish behaviour or speech.
    • c. 1601, William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, Act III, Scene 1, [1]
      Foolery, sir, does walk about the orb like the sun, it shines every where.
    • 1910, John Millington Synge, Deirdre of the Sorrows, in Plays by John M. Synge, London: George Allen & Unwin, 1910, Act I, p. 319, [3]
      Though you think, maybe, young men can do their fill of foolery and there is none to blame them.
    • 1949, George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four, Part Two, Chapter 1, [4]
      He [] hurried off to the Centre, took part in the solemn foolery of a ‘discussion group’ []

Synonyms

  • foolishness

Derived terms

  • April foolery
  • tomfoolery

Translations



English

Etymology

From Middle French indulgence, or its source, Latin indulgentia.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈdʌld͡ʒəns/
  • Hyphenation: in‧dul‧gence

Noun

indulgence (countable and uncountable, plural indulgences)

  1. the act of indulging
    • 1654, Henry Hammond, Of Fundamentals…
      will all they that either through indulgence to others or fondness to any sin in themselves, substitute for repentance any thing that is less than a sincere, uniform resolution of new obedience
  2. tolerance
  3. catering to someone’s every desire
  4. something in which someone indulges
  5. An indulgent act; favour granted; gratification.
    • a. 1729, John Rogers, The Goodness of God a Motive to Repentance
      If all these gracious indulgences are without any effect on us, we must perish in our own folly.
  6. (Roman Catholicism) A pardon or release from the expectation of punishment in purgatory, after the sinner has been granted absolution.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, p. 555:
      To understand how indulgences were intended to work depends on linking together a number of assumptions about sin and the afterlife, each of which individually makes considerable sense.

Related terms

  • indulge
  • indulgent

Translations

Verb

indulgence (third-person singular simple present indulgences, present participle indulgencing, simple past and past participle indulgenced)

  1. (transitive, Roman Catholic Church) to provide with an indulgence

French

Pronunciation

Noun

indulgence f (plural indulgences)

  1. leniency, clemency
  2. (Roman Catholicism) indulgence

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