foolhardy vs heady what difference

what is difference between foolhardy and heady

English

Etymology

From Middle English folehardy, foolhardi, folherdi, from Old French fol hardi (foolishly bold), from Old French fol (foolish, silly; insane, mad) (from Latin follis (bellows; purse, sack; inflated ball; belly, paunch), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰelǵʰ- (to swell)) + Old French hardi (durable, hardy, tough) (past tense of hardir (to harden), from the unattested Frankish *hartjan, from Proto-Germanic *harduz (hard; brave)), equivalent to fool +‎ hardy. Compare fool-bold, fool-large, etc.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfuːlhɑːdi/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfulˌhɑɹdi/
  • Hyphenation: fool‧har‧dy

Adjective

foolhardy (comparative foolhardier or more foolhardy, superlative foolhardiest or most foolhardy)

  1. Marked by unthinking recklessness with disregard for danger; boldly rash; hotheaded.

Synonyms

  • bold
  • daring
  • foolish
  • irresponsible
  • rash
  • reckless

Derived terms

  • foolhardice (obsolete)
  • foolhardihood (obsolete)
  • foolhardily
  • foolhardiness

Translations


Middle English

Adjective

foolhardy

  1. Alternative form of folehardy


English

Etymology

From Middle English hedi, hevedi, equivalent to head +‎ -y.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɛdi/
  • Rhymes: -ɛdi

Adjective

heady (comparative headier, superlative headiest)

  1. Intoxicating or stupefying.
  2. Tending to upset the mind or senses.
  3. Exhilarating.
  4. Intellectual.
  5. Rash or impetuous.

Derived terms

  • headily
  • headiness

Translations

Anagrams

  • hayed

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