foot vs infantry what difference

what is difference between foot and infantry

English

Alternative forms

  • foote (obsolete)
  • (plural): feets (dialectal); foots (nonstandard)

Etymology

From Middle English fot, fote, foot, from Old English fōt, from Proto-West Germanic *fōt, from Proto-Germanic *fōts, from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds. Doublet of pes and pous.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fo͝ot, IPA(key): /fʊt/, [fʊt]
    • (General American) IPA(key): [fʊt̚]
    • (UK) IPA(key): [fʊt̚], [fʊtʰ], [fɵʔt]
    • (Canada) IPA(key): [fʊt̚], [fʷʊt̚]
    • (Cape Flats; Indian South African) IPA(key): [fɤt]
    • (Estuary) IPA(key): [fʉ̞ʔt]
  • Rhymes: -ʊt

Noun

foot (plural feet)

  1. A biological structure found in many animals that is used for locomotion and that is frequently a separate organ at the terminal part of the leg.
  2. (anatomy) Specifically, a human foot, which is found below the ankle and is used for standing and walking.
  3. (often used attributively) Travel by walking.
  4. The base or bottom of anything.
  5. The part of a flat surface on which the feet customarily rest.
  6. The end of a rectangular table opposite the head.
  7. A short foot-like projection on the bottom of an object to support it.
  8. A unit of measure equal to twelve inches or one third of a yard, equal to exactly 30.48 centimetres.
  9. (music) A unit of measure for organ pipes equal to the wavelength of two octaves above middle C, approximately 328 mm.
  10. (collective, military) Foot soldiers; infantry.
  11. (cigars) The end of a cigar which is lit, and usually cut before lighting.
  12. (sewing) The part of a sewing machine which presses downward on the fabric, and may also serve to move it forward.
  13. (printing) The bottommost part of a typed or printed page.
  14. (printing) The base of a piece of type, forming the sides of the groove.
  15. (prosody) The basic measure of rhythm in a poem.
  16. (phonology) The parsing of syllables into prosodic constituents, which are used to determine the placement of stress in languages along with the notions of constituent heads.
  17. (nautical) The bottom edge of a sail.
  18. (billiards) The end of a billiard or pool table behind the foot point where the balls are racked.
  19. (botany) In a bryophyte, that portion of a sporophyte which remains embedded within and attached to the parent gametophyte plant.
  20. (malacology) The muscular part of a bivalve mollusc or a gastropod by which it moves or holds its position on a surface.
  21. (molecular biology) The globular lower domain of a protein.
  22. (geometry) The point of intersection of one line with another that is perpendicular to it.
  23. Fundamental principle; basis; plan.
    • 1732, George Berkeley, Alciphron, or the Minute Philosopher
      Answer directly upon the foot of dry reason.
  24. Recognized condition; rank; footing.
    • May 20, 1742, Horace Walpole, letter to Horace Mann
      As to his being on the foot of a servant.
Usage notes
  • (unit of length):
    • The ordinary plural of the unit of measurement is feet, but in many contexts, foot itself may be used (“he is six foot two”). This is a reflex of the Anglo-Saxon (Old English) genitive plural.
    • It is sometimes abbreviated , such as in tables, lists or drawings.

Synonyms

  • pes

Derived terms

Coordinate terms

  • (unit of length): inch, yard, mile
  • (end of a table): head, sides
  • (bottom of a page): head, body
  • (bottom edge of a sail): head, leech, luff
  • (molecular domain): head, cleft, neck
  • (infantry): horse

Descendants

  • Sranan Tongo: futu

Translations

See also

  • pedal, relating to the foot

Verb

foot (third-person singular simple present foots, present participle footing, simple past and past participle footed)

  1. (transitive) To use the foot to kick (usually a ball).
  2. (transitive) To pay (a bill).
  3. To tread to measure of music; to dance; to trip; to skip.
    • 1836, Joanna Baillie, The Phantom, Act 1 (Dramas 2, p.217)
      There’s time enough, I hope, To foot a measure with the bonnie bride,
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  4. To walk.
  5. To tread.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Tickell to this entry?)
  6. (obsolete) To set on foot; to establish; to land.
  7. To renew the foot of (a stocking, etc.).
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  8. To sum up, as the numbers in a column; sometimes with up.

Derived terms

  • foot the bill

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • foto, ooft, toof

French

Etymology

Clipping of football.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fut/

Noun

foot m (uncountable)

  1. (colloquial) association football; football, soccer

Derived terms

  • ballon de foot
  • footeuse
  • footeux

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English fōt.

Noun

foot

  1. Alternative form of fot

Etymology 2

From fot (noun).

Verb

foot

  1. Alternative form of footen


English

Etymology

From Middle French infanterie, from older Italian, possibly from Spanish infantería (foot soldiers, force composed of those too inexperienced or low in rank for cavalry), from infante (foot soldier), originally “a youth”, either way from Latin īnfāns (child); see there for more.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪnfəntɹi/

Noun

infantry (countable and uncountable, plural infantries)

  1. Soldiers who fight on foot (on land), as opposed to cavalry and other mounted units, regardless of external transport (e.g. airborne).
  2. (uncountable) The part of an army consisting of infantry soldiers, especially opposed to mounted and technical troops
  3. A regiment of infantry

Derived terms

Related terms

  • infant

Translations


Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial