foot vs pes what difference

what is difference between foot and pes

English

Alternative forms

  • foote (obsolete)
  • (plural): feets (dialectal); foots (nonstandard)

Etymology

From Middle English fot, fote, foot, from Old English fōt, from Proto-West Germanic *fōt, from Proto-Germanic *fōts, from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds. Doublet of pes and pous.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fo͝ot, IPA(key): /fʊt/, [fʊt]
    • (General American) IPA(key): [fʊt̚]
    • (UK) IPA(key): [fʊt̚], [fʊtʰ], [fɵʔt]
    • (Canada) IPA(key): [fʊt̚], [fʷʊt̚]
    • (Cape Flats; Indian South African) IPA(key): [fɤt]
    • (Estuary) IPA(key): [fʉ̞ʔt]
  • Rhymes: -ʊt

Noun

foot (plural feet)

  1. A biological structure found in many animals that is used for locomotion and that is frequently a separate organ at the terminal part of the leg.
  2. (anatomy) Specifically, a human foot, which is found below the ankle and is used for standing and walking.
  3. (often used attributively) Travel by walking.
  4. The base or bottom of anything.
  5. The part of a flat surface on which the feet customarily rest.
  6. The end of a rectangular table opposite the head.
  7. A short foot-like projection on the bottom of an object to support it.
  8. A unit of measure equal to twelve inches or one third of a yard, equal to exactly 30.48 centimetres.
  9. (music) A unit of measure for organ pipes equal to the wavelength of two octaves above middle C, approximately 328 mm.
  10. (collective, military) Foot soldiers; infantry.
  11. (cigars) The end of a cigar which is lit, and usually cut before lighting.
  12. (sewing) The part of a sewing machine which presses downward on the fabric, and may also serve to move it forward.
  13. (printing) The bottommost part of a typed or printed page.
  14. (printing) The base of a piece of type, forming the sides of the groove.
  15. (prosody) The basic measure of rhythm in a poem.
  16. (phonology) The parsing of syllables into prosodic constituents, which are used to determine the placement of stress in languages along with the notions of constituent heads.
  17. (nautical) The bottom edge of a sail.
  18. (billiards) The end of a billiard or pool table behind the foot point where the balls are racked.
  19. (botany) In a bryophyte, that portion of a sporophyte which remains embedded within and attached to the parent gametophyte plant.
  20. (malacology) The muscular part of a bivalve mollusc or a gastropod by which it moves or holds its position on a surface.
  21. (molecular biology) The globular lower domain of a protein.
  22. (geometry) The point of intersection of one line with another that is perpendicular to it.
  23. Fundamental principle; basis; plan.
    • 1732, George Berkeley, Alciphron, or the Minute Philosopher
      Answer directly upon the foot of dry reason.
  24. Recognized condition; rank; footing.
    • May 20, 1742, Horace Walpole, letter to Horace Mann
      As to his being on the foot of a servant.
Usage notes
  • (unit of length):
    • The ordinary plural of the unit of measurement is feet, but in many contexts, foot itself may be used (“he is six foot two”). This is a reflex of the Anglo-Saxon (Old English) genitive plural.
    • It is sometimes abbreviated , such as in tables, lists or drawings.

Synonyms

  • pes

Derived terms

Coordinate terms

  • (unit of length): inch, yard, mile
  • (end of a table): head, sides
  • (bottom of a page): head, body
  • (bottom edge of a sail): head, leech, luff
  • (molecular domain): head, cleft, neck
  • (infantry): horse

Descendants

  • Sranan Tongo: futu

Translations

See also

  • pedal, relating to the foot

Verb

foot (third-person singular simple present foots, present participle footing, simple past and past participle footed)

  1. (transitive) To use the foot to kick (usually a ball).
  2. (transitive) To pay (a bill).
  3. To tread to measure of music; to dance; to trip; to skip.
    • 1836, Joanna Baillie, The Phantom, Act 1 (Dramas 2, p.217)
      There’s time enough, I hope, To foot a measure with the bonnie bride,
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  4. To walk.
  5. To tread.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Tickell to this entry?)
  6. (obsolete) To set on foot; to establish; to land.
  7. To renew the foot of (a stocking, etc.).
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  8. To sum up, as the numbers in a column; sometimes with up.

Derived terms

  • foot the bill

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • foto, ooft, toof

French

Etymology

Clipping of football.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fut/

Noun

foot m (uncountable)

  1. (colloquial) association football; football, soccer

Derived terms

  • ballon de foot
  • footeuse
  • footeux

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English fōt.

Noun

foot

  1. Alternative form of fot

Etymology 2

From fot (noun).

Verb

foot

  1. Alternative form of footen


English

Etymology

From Latin pēs (foot). Doublet of foot and pous.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /peɪ̯s/
  • Rhymes: -eɪs
  • Homophone: pace

Noun

pes (plural pedes)

  1. the foot of a human
  2. the hoof of a quadruped
  3. clubfoot or talipes
  4. (music) a neume representing two notes ascending

Synonyms

  • (neume): podatus

Anagrams

  • EPS, EPs, ESP, Eps, PSE, SEP, SPE, Sep, Sep., eps, esp, esp., sep

Catalan

Etymology

From Old Occitan pes, from Vulgar Latin *pēsum, from Latin pensum.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /ˈpəs/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈpɛs/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈpes/

Noun

pes m (plural pesos)

  1. weight (clarification of this definition is needed)

Derived terms

  • contrapès
  • fer el pes
  • sobrepès

Related terms

  • pesar

Further reading

  • “pes” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Cornish

Alternative forms

  • pys

Noun

pes f (singulative pesen)

  1. (Revived Late Cornish) peas

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈpɛs]
  • Hyphenation: pes
  • Rhymes: -ɛs

Etymology 1

From Old Czech pes, from Proto-Slavic *pьsъ.

Noun

pes m anim (feminine psice)

  1. (mammals) dog
  2. male dog
  3. scoundrel, bad person
Declension
Antonyms
  • (male dog): fena
Derived terms

Further reading

  • pes in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • pes in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

pes

  1. genitive plural of peso

Alternative forms

  • pesos

Friulian

Alternative forms

  • peš (alternative orthography)

Etymology

From Latin piscis, piscem.

Noun

pes m (plural pes)

  1. fish

Related terms

  • pescjâ
  • pescjadôr
  • pescjarie
  • pescje
  • pessâr

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch pest, from Middle French peste (whence French peste), ultimately from Latin pestis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈpɛs]
  • Hyphenation: pès

Noun

pes or pès

  1. pest, plague.
    Synonym: sampar

Further reading

  • “pes” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *pets, from Proto-Indo-European *pṓds (compare Sanskrit पद् (pád), Ancient Greek πούς (poús) and Old English fōt, English foot).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /peːs/, [peːs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /pes/, [pɛs]

Noun

pēs m (genitive pedis); third declension

  1. a foot, in its senses as
    1. (anatomy) a human foot
    2. (zoology) any equivalent body part of an animal, including hooves, paws, etc.
    3. (units of measure) any of various units of length notionally based on the adult human foot, especially (historical) the Roman foot.
    4. (poetry) a metrical foot: the basic unit of metered poetry
    5. (geography) the base of a mountain
    6. (furniture) the bottom of a leg of a table, chair, stool, etc.
  2. (figuratively) a place to tread one’s foot: territory, ground, soil
  3. (nautical) a rope attached to a sail in order to set
  4. (music) tempo, pace, time
  5. (botany) the pedicel or stalk of a fruit

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Hyponyms

  • (metrical foot): trochaeus; pes dissyllbus or disyllbus, pes bibrevis, choreus, jambus, spondeus, spondius, spondeos (2-syllable feet); pes trisyllabus, amphibrachus, amphibrachys, amphimacrus, dactylus, extensipes, molossus, pes anapaestus, pes antanapaestus, pes antibacchius, pes bacchius, pes creticus, pes hippius (3-syllable feet); pes tetrasyllbus, antispastus, chorjambus, dichoreus, dijambus, dispondeus, epitritus, paeon, proceleumaticus, proceleusmaticus (4-syllable feet); pes pentasyllbus, dochmius, mesobrachys, mesomacros, pariambodes, probrachys, pes amoebaeus, pes antamoebaeus, pes orthius (5-syllable feet)

Meronyms

  • (unit of length): decempeda (10 pedes)

See also

  • pede tellūrem pulsō
  • pedem effero
  • pedem fero
  • pedem refero
  • pedes navales
  • si in fundo pedem posuisses
  • a pedibus usque ad caput
  • alterno pede terram quatere

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

References

  • pes in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pes in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pes in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • pes in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • pes in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pes in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Lombard

Etymology

Akin to Italian peso, from Latin pensum.

Noun

pes

  1. weight

Middle English

Noun

pes

  1. Alternative form of pese

Old Czech

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *pьsъ.

Noun

pes m

  1. (mammals) dog

Declension

Descendants

  • Czech: pes

Further reading

  • “pes”, in Vokabulář webový: webové hnízdo pramenů k poznání historické češtiny [online][2], Praha: Ústav pro jazyk český AV ČR, 2006–2020

Old French

Etymology

From Latin pax.

Noun

pes f (oblique plural pes, nominative singular pes, nominative plural pes)

  1. Alternative form of pais (peace)
    • circa 1250, Marie de France, Guigemar
      Va t’en de ci ! Lai me aveir pes.

      Go, leave me! Let me have peace.

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *pьsъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɛs/

Noun

pes m (Cyrillic spelling пес)

  1. (Kajkavian) dog

Synonyms

  • pas

Slovak

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *pьsъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɛs/

Noun

pes m (genitive singular psa, nominative plural psi, psy, genitive plural psov)

  1. dog

Declension

Derived terms

  • psí
  • psíček
  • psík
  • psisko
  • psíča

Further reading

  • pes in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

Slovene

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *pьsъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pə́s/

Noun

pə̏s m anim (female equivalent psíca)

  1. dog
    Synonym: kȗža

Inflection

Further reading

  • pes”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpes/, [ˈpes]
  • Homophone: pez (non-Castilian)

Noun

pes

  1. plural of pe

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English face.

Noun

pes

  1. (anatomy) face

Torres Strait Creole

Etymology 1

From English face.

Noun

pes

  1. face

Etymology 2

Noun

pes

  1. (eastern dialect) a ripe coconut

Usage notes

Pes is the fifth stage of coconut growth. It is preceded by kopespes and followed by u.


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