footsure vs surefooted what difference

what is difference between footsure and surefooted

English

Etymology

foot +‎ sure

Adjective

footsure (comparative more footsure, superlative most footsure)

  1. Sure of one’s footing; not stumbling or tripping while walking.
    • 1994, George McDonald, Marylyn Springer, Frommer’s Comprehensive Travel Guide, Cruises, 1995-1996 (page 48)
      You can still visit that sky-high fortress that was said to have taken the lives of 20,000 men during the decade of its construction. You get there atop a small but footsure donkey led by energetic and equally footsure youngsters.
  2. Of flooring, etc.: antislip.
    • 1944, Modern Machine Shop (volume 17, page 263)
      It makes floors footsure preventing slipping and skidding accidents.


English

Alternative forms

  • sure-footed

Etymology

sure +‎ footed

Adjective

surefooted (comparative more surefooted, superlative most surefooted)

  1. Walking steadily, without stumbling; capable of finding good footing.
    • 1766, Tobias Smollett, Travels through France and Italy, Letter XX, [1]
      The mules of Piedmont are exceeding strong and hardy. [] They are the only carriage that can be used in crossing the mountains, being very sure-footed: and it is observed that in choosing their steps, they always march upon the brink of the precipice.
    • 1997, Emma Donoghue, “The Tale of the Needle” in Kissing the Witch: Old Tales in New Skins, New York: HarperCollins, p. 169,
      For many years I didn’t learn to walk, because I was carried everywhere—not by my parents, who had grown frail, but by the most sure-footed of the servants.
  2. Confident and capable.

Translations


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