forage vs grass what difference

what is difference between forage and grass

English

Etymology

From Middle English forage, from Old French fourage, forage, a derivative of fuerre (fodder, straw), from Frankish *fōdar (fodder, sheath), from Proto-Germanic *fōdrą (fodder, feed, sheath), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂- (to protect, to feed). Cognate with Old High German fuotar (German Futter (fodder, feed)), Old English fōdor, fōþor (food, fodder, covering, case, basket), Dutch voeder (forage, food, feed), Danish foder (fodder, feed), Icelandic fóðr (fodder, sheath). More at fodder, food.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɒɹ.ɪd͡ʒ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɔɹɪd͡ʒ/
  • (NYC, Ireland) IPA(key): /ˈfɑɹɪd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒɹɪdʒ

Noun

forage (countable and uncountable, plural forages)

  1. Fodder for animals, especially cattle and horses.
    • 1819, Sir Walter Scott, Ivanhoe:[1]
      “The hermit was apparently somewhat moved to compassion by the anxiety as well as address which the stranger displayed in tending his horse; for, muttering something about provender left for the keeper’s palfrey, he dragged out of a recess a bundle of forage, which he spread before the knight’s charger.
    • To invade the corn, and to their cells convey
      The plundered forage of their yellow prey
  2. An act or instance of foraging.
    • 1803, John Marshall, The Life of George Washington
      Mawhood completed his forage unmolested.
    • 1860 September, “A Chapter on Rats”, in The Knickerbocker, volume 56, number 3, page 304:
      ‘My dears,’ he discourses to them — how he licks his gums, long toothless, as he speaks of his forages into the well-stored cellars: []
  3. (obsolete) The demand for fodder etc by an army from the local population

Translations

Further reading

  • Forage on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Forage in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Verb

forage (third-person singular simple present forages, present participle foraging, simple past and past participle foraged)

  1. To search for and gather food for animals, particularly cattle and horses.
    • 1841, James Fenimore Cooper, The Deerslayer, Chapter 8:
      The message said that the party intended to hunt and forage through this region, for a month or two, afore it went back into the Canadas.
  2. To rampage through, gathering and destroying as one goes.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Henry V, Act 1, Scene 2:
      And your great-uncle’s, Edward the Black Prince, / Who on the French ground play’d a tragedy, / Making defeat on the full power of France, / Whiles his most mighty father on a hill / Stood smiling to behold his lion’s whelp / Forage in blood of French nobility.
  3. To rummage.
  4. Of an animal: to seek out and eat food.

Derived terms

  • forager

Translations


French

Etymology

From forer +‎ -age

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔ.ʁaʒ/

Noun

forage m (plural forages)

  1. drilling (act of drilling)

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “forage” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • fforage

Etymology

Borrowed from Old French fourage; the first element is cognate to fodder.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔːˈraːdʒ(ə)/, /fɔˈraːdʒ(ə)/

Noun

forage (uncountable)

  1. forage (especially dry)

Descendants

  • English: forage

References

  • “fō̆rāǧe, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-10-17.


English

Etymology

From Middle English gras, gres, gers, from Old English græs, gærs (grass, blade of grass, herb, young corn, hay, plant; pasture), from Proto-West Germanic *gras (grass), from Proto-Germanic *grasą (grass), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰreh₁- (to grow).

The “informer” sense is probably a shortening of grasshopper (police officer, informant), rhyming slang for copper (police officer) or shopper (informant) (the exact sequence of derivation is unclear).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: gräs, IPA(key): /ɡɹɑːs/
    • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): [ɡɹ̠ɑːs]
    • (General Australian, General New Zealand) IPA(key): [ɡɹ̠äːs], [ɡɹ̠ɐːs]
    • Rhymes: -ɑːs
  • enPR: grăs, IPA(key): /ɡɹæs/
    • (US, Canada) IPA(key): [ɡɹ̠æs], [ɡɹ̠ɛəs], [ɡɹ̠eəs]
    • (Northern England, Ireland) IPA(key): [ɡɹ̠as], [ɡɹ̠æs]
    • Rhymes: -æs

Noun

grass (countable and uncountable, plural grasses)

  1. (countable, uncountable) Any plant of the family Poaceae, characterized by leaves that arise from nodes in the stem and leaf bases that wrap around the stem, especially those grown as ground cover rather than for grain.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:grass
    • Thou turnest man to destruction; and sayest, Return, ye children of men.
      For a thousand years in thy sight are but as yesterday when it is past, and as a watch in the night.
      Thou carriest them away as with a flood; they are as a sleep: in the morning they are like grass which groweth up.
      In the morning it flourisheth, and groweth up; in the evening it is cut down, and withereth.
  2. (countable) Various plants not in family Poaceae that resemble grasses.
  3. (uncountable) A lawn.
  4. (uncountable, slang) Marijuana.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:marijuana
  5. (countable, Britain, slang) An informer, police informer; one who betrays a group (of criminals, etc) to the authorities.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:informant
  6. (uncountable, physics) Sharp, closely spaced discontinuities in the trace of a cathode-ray tube, produced by random interference.
  7. (uncountable, slang) Noise on an A-scope or similar type of radar display.
    • 1960, United States. Bureau of Naval Personnel, Radarman 3 & 2 (volume 1, page 49)
      The problem in radar detection is to have a signal to noise ratio that will allow the echo to be seen through the grass on the radar screen. The use of a long pulse allows a greater average signal strength to be returned in the target echoes.
    • 1963, Analysis of Weapons (page 61)
      Some of the scattered waves can be picked up by the receiver and may show up as “grass” on the radar presentation. Weather radars make use of this phenomenon to chart the progress of storms.
  8. The season of fresh grass; spring or summer.
    Synonyms: breakup, spring, springtime
  9. (obsolete, figuratively) That which is transitory.
    Synonym: ephemera
  10. (countable, folk etymology) Asparagus; “sparrowgrass”.
  11. (mining) The surface of a mine.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Tok Pisin: gras, garas
  • Fiji Hindi: giraas

Translations

See also

  • Poaceae on Wikispecies.Wikispecies
  • Grass (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Verb

grass (third-person singular simple present grasses, present participle grassing, simple past and past participle grassed)

  1. (transitive) To lay out on the grass; to knock down (an opponent etc.).
    Synonyms: flatten, floor, lay low, lay out, knock down, knock out, knock over, strike down
  2. (transitive or intransitive, slang) To act as a grass or informer, to betray; to report on (criminals etc) to the authorities.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:rat out
  3. (transitive) To cover with grass or with turf.
  4. (transitive) To feed with grass.
  5. (transitive) To expose, as flax, on the grass for bleaching, etc.
  6. (transitive) To bring to the grass or ground; to land.
    • 1903, John Buchan, The African Colony
      Let him hook and land a tigerfish of 20 lb., at the imminent risk of capsizing and joining the company of the engaging crocodiles, or, when he has grassed the fish, of having a finger bitten off by his iron teeth []

Translations


Cimbrian

Alternative forms

  • gras (Sette Comuni)

Etymology

From Middle High German gras, from Old High German gras, from Proto-West Germanic *gras, from Proto-Germanic *grasą. Cognate with German Gras, English grass.

Noun

grass m

  1. (Luserna, Tredici Comuni) grass

References

  • “grass” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Lombard

Etymology

From Latin crassus. Compare Italian grasso.

Adjective

grass

  1. fat, thick

Noun

grass

  1. fat, grease

Romansch

Etymology

From Latin crassus. Compare French graisse.

Noun

grass m

  1. fat

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