force vs power what difference

what is difference between force and power

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: fôrs, IPA(key): /fɔɹs/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɔːs/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: fōrs, IPA(key): /fo(ː)ɹs/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /foəs/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)s

Etymology 1

From Middle English force, fors, forse, from Old French force, from Late Latin or Vulgar Latin *fortia, from neuter plural of Latin fortis (strong), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (to rise, high, hill).

Noun

force (countable and uncountable, plural forces)

  1. Strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigour; might; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect.
  2. Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, part II
      which now they hold by force, and not by right
  3. (countable) Anything that is able to make a substantial change in a person or thing.
  4. (countable, physics) A physical quantity that denotes ability to push, pull, twist or accelerate a body and which has a direction and is measured in a unit dimensioned in mass × distance/time² (ML/T²): SI: newton (N); CGS: dyne (dyn)
  5. Something or anything that has the power to produce a physical effect upon something else, such as causing it to move or change shape.
  6. (countable) A group that aims to attack, control, or constrain.
    • 1611, William Shakespeare, Cymbeline
      Is Lucius general of the forces?
  7. (uncountable) The ability to attack, control, or constrain.
  8. (countable) A magic trick in which the outcome is known to the magician beforehand, especially one involving the apparent free choice of a card by another person.
  9. (law) Legal validity.
  10. (law) Either unlawful violence, as in a “forced entry“, or lawful compulsion.
  11. (linguistics, semantics, pragmatics) Ability of an utterance or its element (word, form, prosody, …) to effect a given meaning.
  12. (humorous or science fiction, with the, often capitalized) A metaphysical and ubiquitous power from the fictional Star Wars universe created by George Lucas. See usage note. [1977]
  13. Synonym of police force (typically with preceding “the”)
Usage notes
  • Adjectives often applied to “force”: military, cultural, economic, gravitational, electric, magnetic, strong, weak, positive, negative, attractive, repulsive, good, evil, dark, physical, muscular, spiritual, intellectual, mental, emotional, rotational, tremendous, huge.
  • (science fiction): Outside of fiction, the force may be used as an alternative to invoking luck, destiny, or God. For example, the force was with him instead of luck was on his side, or may the force be with you instead of may God be with you.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • may the Force be with you
  • workforce
Related terms
Translations

References

  • force on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

From Middle English forcen, from Old French forcer, from Late Latin *fortiāre, from Latin fortia.

Verb

force (third-person singular simple present forces, present participle forcing, simple past and past participle forced)

  1. (transitive) To violate (a woman); to rape. [from 14thc.]
  2. (obsolete, reflexive, intransitive) To exert oneself, to do one’s utmost. [from 14thc.]
    • And I pray you for my sake to force yourselff there, that men may speke you worshyp.
  3. (transitive) To compel (someone or something) to do something. [from 15thc.]
    • 2011, Tim Webb & Fiona Harvey, The Guardian, 23 March:
      Housebuilders had warned that the higher costs involved would have forced them to build fewer homes and priced many homebuyers out of the market.
  4. (transitive) To constrain by force; to overcome the limitations or resistance of. [from 16thc.]
  5. (transitive) To drive (something) by force, to propel (generally + prepositional phrase or adverb). [from 16thc.]
    • It stuck so fast, so deeply buried lay / That scarce the victor forced the steel away.
    • Ethelbert [] ordered that none should be forced into religion.
    • 2007, The Guardian, 4 November:
      In a groundbreaking move, the Pentagon is compensating servicemen seriously hurt when an American tank convoy forced them off the road.
  6. (transitive) To cause to occur (despite inertia, resistance etc.); to produce through force. [from 16thc.]
    • 2009, “All things to Althingi”, The Economist, 23 July:
      The second problem is the economy, the shocking state of which has forced the decision to apply to the EU.
  7. (transitive) To forcibly open (a door, lock etc.). [from 17thc.]
  8. To obtain or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress.
  9. (transitive, baseball) To create an out by touching a base in advance of a runner who has no base to return to while in possession of a ball which has already touched the ground.
  10. (whist) To compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit that he/she does not hold.
  11. (archaic) To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce.
  12. (archaic) To provide with forces; to reinforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison.
  13. (obsolete) To allow the force of; to value; to care for.
Derived terms
  • enforce
  • forceful
  • forcible
Translations

See also

  • Imperial unit: foot pound
  • metric unit: newton
  • coerce: To control by force.

Etymology 3

From Middle English force, forz, fors, from Old Norse fors (waterfall), from Proto-Germanic *fursaz (waterfall). Cognate with Icelandic foss (waterfall), Norwegian foss (waterfall), Swedish fors (waterfall). Doublet of foss.

Noun

force (plural forces)

  1. (countable, Northern England) A waterfall or cascade.
    • 1778, Thomas West, A Guide to the Lakes in Cumberland, Westmorland, and Lancashire
      to see the falls or force of the river Kent
Derived terms
  • forcefall
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English forcen, forsen, a use of force, with confusion of farce (to stuff).

Verb

force (third-person singular simple present forces, present participle forcing, simple past and past participle forced)

  1. To stuff; to lard; to farce.

Derived terms

  • forcemeat

Further reading

  • force at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • force in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • force in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Cofer, Corfe, corfe

French

Etymology

From Middle French force, from Old French force, from Late Latin or Vulgar Latin *fortia, re-analyzed as a feminine singular from the neuter plural of Latin fortis. Compare Catalan força, Portuguese força, Italian forza, Spanish fuerza.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔʁs/
  • Rhymes: -ɔʁs
  • Homophones: forcent, forces

Noun

force f (plural forces)

  1. force
  2. strength

Synonyms

  • pouvoir
  • puissance
  • violence

Derived terms

Adjective

force (invariable)

  1. (archaic) Many; a lot of; a great quantity of.

Verb

force

  1. first/third-person singular present indicative of forcer
  2. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of forcer
  3. second-person singular imperative of forcer

Further reading

  • “force” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French force.

Noun

force f (plural forces)

  1. force (physical effort; physical might)

Descendants

  • French: force

Old French

Alternative forms

  • forche (Picardy, Old Northern French)
  • fors

Etymology

From Late Latin or Vulgar Latin *fortia, re-analyzed as a feminine singular from the neuter plural of Latin fortis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɔr.t͡sə/

Noun

force f (oblique plural forces, nominative singular force, nominative plural forces)

  1. strength; might

Related terms

  • esforcer
  • esfort
  • fort
  • forteresce

Descendants

  • Middle French: force
    • French: force
  • Walloon: foice
  • Middle English: force / fors / forse
    • English: force

Portuguese

Verb

force

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of forçar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of forçar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of forçar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of forçar


English

Alternative forms

  • powre (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English power, poer, from Old French poeir, from Vulgar Latin *potēre, from Latin possum, posse (to be able); see potent. Compare Modern French pouvoir. Displaced native Old English anweald.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈpaʊə(ɹ)/, /ˈpaʊ.ə(ɹ)/
    • (with triphthong smoothing) IPA(key): /paə/, /paː/, /pɑː/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈpaʊ.ɚ/, /ˈpaʊɹ/, [ˈpʰaʊ̯ɚ], [ˈpʰaʊ̯ɹ]
  • Rhymes: -aʊ.ə(ɹ), -aʊə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: pow‧er

Noun

power (countable and uncountable, plural powers)

  1. Ability to do or undergo something.
    • 2018, Marilyn McCord Adams, Horrendous Evils and the Goodness of God (page 74)
      If it is spirits who have power to suffer, it seems they would also have active powers to think and will.
  2. (social) Ability to coerce, influence or control.
    1. (countable) Ability to affect or influence.
      • An incident which happened about this time will set the characters of these two lads more fairly before the discerning reader than is in the power of the longest dissertation.
      • Thwackum, on the contrary, maintained that the human mind, since the fall, was nothing but a sink of iniquity, till purified and redeemed by grace. [] The favourite phrase of the former, was the natural beauty of virtue; that of the latter, was the divine power of grace.
      • 1998, Eckhart Tolle, The Power of Now
        Past and future obviously have no reality of their own. Just as the moon has no light of its own, but can only reflect the light of the sun, so are past and future only pale reflections of the light, power, and reality of the eternal present.
    2. Control or coercion, particularly legal or political (jurisdiction).
      • 1949, Eric Blair, aka George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four
        The Party seeks power entirely for its own sake. We are not interested in the good of others; we are interested solely in power. Not wealth or luxury or long life or happiness: only power, pure power. […] We know that no one ever seizes power with the intention of relinquishing it. Power is not a means, it is an end. One does not establish a dictatorship in order to safeguard a revolution; one makes the revolution in order to establish the dictatorship. The object of persecution is persecution. The object of torture is torture. The object of power is power.
      • 2005, Columbia Law Review, April
        In the face of expanding federal power, California in particular struggled to maintain control over its Chinese population.
    3. (metonymically, chiefly in the plural) The people in charge of legal or political power, the government.
      Synonym: powers that be
    4. (metonymically) An influential nation, company, or other such body.
  3. (physical, uncountable) Effectiveness.
    1. Physical force or strength.
    2. Electricity or a supply of electricity.
    3. A measure of the rate of doing work or transferring energy.
    4. The strength by which a lens or mirror magnifies an optical image.
  4. (colloquial, dated) A large amount or number.
    • The threatning words of duke Robert comming at the last to king Henries eares, caused him foorthwith to conceiue verie sore displeasure against a power of men sent into Normandie.
  5. Any of the elementary forms or parts of machines: three primary (the lever, inclined plane, and pulley) and three secondary (the wheel-and-axle, wedge, and screw).
    the mechanical powers
  6. (physics, mechanics) A measure of the effectiveness that a force producing a physical effect has over time. If linear, the quotient of: (force multiplied by the displacement of or in an object) ÷ time. If rotational, the quotient of: (force multiplied by the angle of displacement) ÷ time.
  7. (mathematics)
    1. A product of equal factors (and generalizations of this notion):




      x

      n




      {\displaystyle x^{n}}

      , read as “




      x


      {\displaystyle x}

      to the power of




      n


      {\displaystyle n}

      ” or the like, is called a power and denotes the product




      x
      ×
      x
      ×

      ×
      x


      {\displaystyle x\times x\times \cdots \times x}

      , where




      x


      {\displaystyle x}

      appears




      n


      {\displaystyle n}

      times in the product;




      x


      {\displaystyle x}

      is called the base and




      n


      {\displaystyle n}

      the exponent.

    2. (set theory) Cardinality.
    3. (statistics) The probability that a statistical test will reject the null hypothesis when the alternative hypothesis is true.
  8. (biblical, in the plural) In Christian angelology, an intermediate level of angels, ranked above archangels, but exact position varies by classification scheme.

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often used with “power”: electric, nuclear, optical, mechanical, political, absolute, corporate, institutional, military, economic, solar, magic, magical, huge, physical, mental, intellectual, emotional, spiritual, sexual, seductive, coercive, erotic, natural, cultural, positive, negative, etc.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:power
  • Antonyms

    • impotence
    • weakness

    Hyponyms

    Derived terms

    Related terms

    • possible
    • potent

    Descendants

    • German: Power
    • Welsh: pŵer

    Translations

    See also

    Other terms used in arithmetic operations:

    Advanced hyperoperations: tetration, pentation, hexation

    Verb

    power (third-person singular simple present powers, present participle powering, simple past and past participle powered)

    1. (transitive) To provide power for (a mechanical or electronic device).
      This CD player is powered by batteries.
    2. (transitive) To hit or kick something forcefully.
    3. To enable or provide the impetus for.

    Derived terms

    • power down
    • power up
    • empower

    Translations

    Adjective

    power (comparative more power, superlative most power)

    1. (Singapore, colloquial) Impressive.

    Further reading

    • power at OneLook Dictionary Search

    Anagrams

    • powre

    German

    Etymology 1

    From French pauvre, from Latin pauper.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ˈpoːvər/, [ˈpoːvɐ]
    • Hyphenation: po‧wer

    Adjective

    power (comparative powerer, superlative am powersten)

    1. (regional, informal) poor, miserable
    Declension

    Etymology 2

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ˈpaʊ̯ər/, [ˈpaʊ̯ɐ]
    • Homophone: Power

    Verb

    power

    1. singular imperative of powern
    2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of powern

    Further reading

    • “power” in Duden online

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