force vs pull what difference

what is difference between force and pull

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: fôrs, IPA(key): /fɔɹs/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɔːs/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: fōrs, IPA(key): /fo(ː)ɹs/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /foəs/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)s

Etymology 1

From Middle English force, fors, forse, from Old French force, from Late Latin or Vulgar Latin *fortia, from neuter plural of Latin fortis (strong), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (to rise, high, hill).

Noun

force (countable and uncountable, plural forces)

  1. Strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigour; might; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect.
  2. Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, part II
      which now they hold by force, and not by right
  3. (countable) Anything that is able to make a substantial change in a person or thing.
  4. (countable, physics) A physical quantity that denotes ability to push, pull, twist or accelerate a body and which has a direction and is measured in a unit dimensioned in mass × distance/time² (ML/T²): SI: newton (N); CGS: dyne (dyn)
  5. Something or anything that has the power to produce a physical effect upon something else, such as causing it to move or change shape.
  6. (countable) A group that aims to attack, control, or constrain.
    • 1611, William Shakespeare, Cymbeline
      Is Lucius general of the forces?
  7. (uncountable) The ability to attack, control, or constrain.
  8. (countable) A magic trick in which the outcome is known to the magician beforehand, especially one involving the apparent free choice of a card by another person.
  9. (law) Legal validity.
  10. (law) Either unlawful violence, as in a “forced entry“, or lawful compulsion.
  11. (linguistics, semantics, pragmatics) Ability of an utterance or its element (word, form, prosody, …) to effect a given meaning.
  12. (humorous or science fiction, with the, often capitalized) A metaphysical and ubiquitous power from the fictional Star Wars universe created by George Lucas. See usage note. [1977]
  13. Synonym of police force (typically with preceding “the”)
Usage notes
  • Adjectives often applied to “force”: military, cultural, economic, gravitational, electric, magnetic, strong, weak, positive, negative, attractive, repulsive, good, evil, dark, physical, muscular, spiritual, intellectual, mental, emotional, rotational, tremendous, huge.
  • (science fiction): Outside of fiction, the force may be used as an alternative to invoking luck, destiny, or God. For example, the force was with him instead of luck was on his side, or may the force be with you instead of may God be with you.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • may the Force be with you
  • workforce
Related terms
Translations

References

  • force on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

From Middle English forcen, from Old French forcer, from Late Latin *fortiāre, from Latin fortia.

Verb

force (third-person singular simple present forces, present participle forcing, simple past and past participle forced)

  1. (transitive) To violate (a woman); to rape. [from 14thc.]
  2. (obsolete, reflexive, intransitive) To exert oneself, to do one’s utmost. [from 14thc.]
    • And I pray you for my sake to force yourselff there, that men may speke you worshyp.
  3. (transitive) To compel (someone or something) to do something. [from 15thc.]
    • 2011, Tim Webb & Fiona Harvey, The Guardian, 23 March:
      Housebuilders had warned that the higher costs involved would have forced them to build fewer homes and priced many homebuyers out of the market.
  4. (transitive) To constrain by force; to overcome the limitations or resistance of. [from 16thc.]
  5. (transitive) To drive (something) by force, to propel (generally + prepositional phrase or adverb). [from 16thc.]
    • It stuck so fast, so deeply buried lay / That scarce the victor forced the steel away.
    • Ethelbert [] ordered that none should be forced into religion.
    • 2007, The Guardian, 4 November:
      In a groundbreaking move, the Pentagon is compensating servicemen seriously hurt when an American tank convoy forced them off the road.
  6. (transitive) To cause to occur (despite inertia, resistance etc.); to produce through force. [from 16thc.]
    • 2009, “All things to Althingi”, The Economist, 23 July:
      The second problem is the economy, the shocking state of which has forced the decision to apply to the EU.
  7. (transitive) To forcibly open (a door, lock etc.). [from 17thc.]
  8. To obtain or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress.
  9. (transitive, baseball) To create an out by touching a base in advance of a runner who has no base to return to while in possession of a ball which has already touched the ground.
  10. (whist) To compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit that he/she does not hold.
  11. (archaic) To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce.
  12. (archaic) To provide with forces; to reinforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison.
  13. (obsolete) To allow the force of; to value; to care for.
Derived terms
  • enforce
  • forceful
  • forcible
Translations

See also

  • Imperial unit: foot pound
  • metric unit: newton
  • coerce: To control by force.

Etymology 3

From Middle English force, forz, fors, from Old Norse fors (waterfall), from Proto-Germanic *fursaz (waterfall). Cognate with Icelandic foss (waterfall), Norwegian foss (waterfall), Swedish fors (waterfall). Doublet of foss.

Noun

force (plural forces)

  1. (countable, Northern England) A waterfall or cascade.
    • 1778, Thomas West, A Guide to the Lakes in Cumberland, Westmorland, and Lancashire
      to see the falls or force of the river Kent
Derived terms
  • forcefall
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English forcen, forsen, a use of force, with confusion of farce (to stuff).

Verb

force (third-person singular simple present forces, present participle forcing, simple past and past participle forced)

  1. To stuff; to lard; to farce.

Derived terms

  • forcemeat

Further reading

  • force at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • force in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • force in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Cofer, Corfe, corfe

French

Etymology

From Middle French force, from Old French force, from Late Latin or Vulgar Latin *fortia, re-analyzed as a feminine singular from the neuter plural of Latin fortis. Compare Catalan força, Portuguese força, Italian forza, Spanish fuerza.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔʁs/
  • Rhymes: -ɔʁs
  • Homophones: forcent, forces

Noun

force f (plural forces)

  1. force
  2. strength

Synonyms

  • pouvoir
  • puissance
  • violence

Derived terms

Adjective

force (invariable)

  1. (archaic) Many; a lot of; a great quantity of.

Verb

force

  1. first/third-person singular present indicative of forcer
  2. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of forcer
  3. second-person singular imperative of forcer

Further reading

  • “force” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French force.

Noun

force f (plural forces)

  1. force (physical effort; physical might)

Descendants

  • French: force

Old French

Alternative forms

  • forche (Picardy, Old Northern French)
  • fors

Etymology

From Late Latin or Vulgar Latin *fortia, re-analyzed as a feminine singular from the neuter plural of Latin fortis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɔr.t͡sə/

Noun

force f (oblique plural forces, nominative singular force, nominative plural forces)

  1. strength; might

Related terms

  • esforcer
  • esfort
  • fort
  • forteresce

Descendants

  • Middle French: force
    • French: force
  • Walloon: foice
  • Middle English: force / fors / forse
    • English: force

Portuguese

Verb

force

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of forçar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of forçar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of forçar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of forçar


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: po͝ol, IPA(key): /pʊl/
  • Hyphenation: pull
  • Rhymes: -ʊl

Etymology

Verb from Middle English pullen, from Old English pullian (to pull, draw, tug, pluck off). Related to West Frisian pûlje (to shell, husk), Middle Dutch pullen (to drink), Middle Dutch polen (to peel, strip), Low German pulen (to pick, pluck, pull, tear, strip off husks), Icelandic púla (to work hard, beat).

Noun from Middle English pul, pull, pulle, from the verb pullen (to pull).

Verb

pull (third-person singular simple present pulls, present participle pulling, simple past and past participle pulled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To apply a force to (an object) so that it comes toward the person or thing applying the force.
    • He put forth his hand [] and pulled her in.
  2. To gather with the hand, or by drawing toward oneself; to pluck.
  3. (transitive) To attract or net; to pull in.
    • 2002, Marcella Ridlen Ray, Changing and Unchanging Face of United States Civil Society
      Television, a favored source of news and information, pulls the largest share of advertising monies.
    • 2011, Russell Simmons, ‎Chris Morrow, Super Rich: A Guide to Having It All
      While the pimp can always pull a ho with his magnetism, he can never pull a nun. The nun is too in touch with her own compassionate and honest spirit to react to a spirit as negative and deceitful as that of the pimp.
  4. (transitive, intransitive, Britain, Ireland, slang) To persuade (someone) to have sex with one.
  5. (transitive) To remove (something), especially from public circulation or availability.
  6. (transitive) To retrieve or generate for use.
    • 2006, Michael Bellomo, Joel Elad, How to Sell Anything on Amazon…and Make a Fortune!
      They’ll go through their computer system and pull a report of all your order fulfillment records for the time period you specify.
  7. (transitive, informal) To do or perform.
  8. (with ‘a’ and the name of a person, place, event, etc.) To copy or emulate the actions or behaviour that is associated with the person or thing mentioned.
  9. To toss a frisbee with the intention of launching the disc across the length of a field.
  10. (intransitive) To row.
    • 1874, Marcus Clarke, For the Term of His Natural Life Chapter VI
  11. (transitive, rowing) To achieve by rowing on a rowing machine.
    It had been a sort of race hitherto, and the rowers, with set teeth and compressed lips, had pulled stroke for stroke.
  12. To draw apart; to tear; to rend.
    • He hath turned aside my ways, and pulled me in pieces; he hath made me desolate.
    • 2009, Ardie A. Davis, ‎Chef Paul Kirk, America’s Best BBQ (page 57)
      If you are going to pull or chop the pork butt, take it out of the smoker when the meat is in the higher temperature range, put it in a large pan, and let it rest, covered, for 15 to 20 minutes. Using heavy-duty dinner forks, pull the pork butt to shreds.
  13. (transitive) To strain (a muscle, tendon, ligament, etc.).
  14. (video games, transitive, intransitive) To draw (a hostile non-player character) into combat, or toward or away from some location or target.
    • 2003 April 9, “Richard Lawson” (username), “Monual’s Willful Ignorance”, in alt.games.everquest, Usenet:
      …we had to clear a long hallway, run up half way, pull the boss mob to us, and engage.
    • 2004 October 18, “Stush” (username), “Re: focus pull”, in alt.games.dark-age-of-camelot, Usenet:
      Basically buff pet, have it pull lots of mobs, shield pet, chain heal pet, have your aoe casters finish off hurt mobs once pet gets good aggro.
    • 2005 August 2, “Brian” (username), “Re: How to tank Stratholme undead pulls?”, in alt.games.warcraft, Usenet:
      This is the only thing that should get you to break off from your position, is to pull something off the healer.
    • 2007 April 10, “John Salerno” (username), “Re: Managing the Command Buttons”, in alt.games.warcraft, Usenet:
      You could also set a fire trap, pull the mob toward it, then send in your pet….
    • 2008 August 18, “Mark (newsgroups)” (username), “Re: I’m a priest now!”, in alt.games.warcraft, Usenet:
      Shield yourself, pull with Mind Blast if you want, or merely pull with SW:P to save mana, then wand, fear if you need to, but use the lowest rank fear.
  15. (Britain) To score a certain number of points in a sport.
    How many points did you pull today, Albert?
  16. (horse-racing) To hold back, and so prevent from winning.
    The favourite was pulled.
  17. (printing, dated) To take or make (a proof or impression); so called because hand presses were worked by pulling a lever.
  18. (cricket, golf) To strike the ball in a particular manner. (See noun sense.)
    • 1888, Robert Henry Lyttelton, Cricket Chapter 2
      Never pull a straight fast ball to leg.
  19. (Britain) To draw beer from a pump, keg, or other source.
  20. (rail transportation, US, of a railroad car) To pull out from a yard or station; to leave.
  21. (now chiefly Scotland, England and US regional) To pluck or pick (flowers, fruit etc.).
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, I.19:
      He and some of his companions one day entered a garden in the suburbs, and having indulged their appetites, desired to know what satisfaction they must make for the fruit they had pulled.

Synonyms

  • (apply force to (something) so it comes toward): drag, tow, tug, yank
  • (slang: to persuade to have sex with one): score
  • (to remove from circulation): recall, withdraw, yank
  • (to do, to perform): carry out, complete, do, execute, perform
  • (to retrieve or generate for use): generate, get, get hold of, get one’s hands on, lay one’s hands on, obtain, retrieve
  • (to succeed in finding a person with whom to have sex.): score

Antonyms

  • (apply force to (something) so it comes towards one): push, repel, shove

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

See also pulling

Translations

Interjection

pull

  1. (sports) Command used by a target shooter to request that the target be released/launched.

Noun

pull (countable and uncountable, plural pulls)

  1. An act of pulling (applying force toward oneself)
    • I found myself suddenly awaked with a violent pull upon the ring, which was fastened at the top of my box.
  2. An attractive force which causes motion towards the source
  3. (figuratively, by extension) An advantage over somebody; means of influencing.
  4. Any device meant to be pulled, as a lever, knob, handle, or rope
  5. (slang, dated) Something in one’s favour in a comparison or a contest.
  6. Appeal or attraction (e.g. of a movie star)
  7. (Internet, uncountable) The situation where a client sends out a request for data from a server, as in server pull, pull technology
  8. A journey made by rowing
    • 1874, Marcus Clarke, For the Term of His Natural Life Chapter V
      As Blunt had said, the burning ship lay a good twelve miles from the Malabar, and the pull was a long and a weary one. Once fairly away from the protecting sides of the vessel that had borne them thus far on their dismal journey, the adventurers seemed to have come into a new atmosphere.
  9. (dated) A contest; a struggle.
    • 1602, Richard Carew, Survey of Cornwall
      this wrastling pull betweene Corineus and Gogmagog, is reported to have befallen at Douer.
  10. (obsolete, poetic) Loss or violence suffered.
  11. (colloquial) The act of drinking; a mouthful or swig of a drink.
  12. (cricket) A type of stroke by which a leg ball is sent to the off side, or an off ball to the on side; a pull shot.
    • 1887, R. A. Proctor, Longman’s Magazine
      The pull is not a legitimate stroke, but bad cricket.
  13. (golf) A mishit shot which travels in a straight line and (for a right-handed player) left of the intended path.
  14. (printing, historical) A single impression from a handpress.
  15. (printing) A proof sheet.

Synonyms

  • (act of pulling): tug, yank
  • (attractive force): attraction
  • (device meant to be pulled): handle, knob, lever, rope
  • (influence): influence, sway
  • (a puff on a cigarette): drag, toke (marijuana cigarette)

Antonyms

  • (act of pulling): push, shove
  • (attractive force): repulsion
  • (device meant to be pulled): button, push, push-button
  • (influence):

Derived terms

  • ring-pull
  • rug-pull

Related terms

  • on the pull
  • pull cord
  • ring-pull, ring pull

Translations


Estonian

Etymology

From Low German bulle.

Noun

pull (genitive pulli, partitive pulli)

  1. bull
  2. ox

Declension


French

Etymology

Clipping of pull-over, from English pullover.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pyl/, /pul/

Noun

pull m (plural pulls)

  1. pullover

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