force vs squeeze what difference

what is difference between force and squeeze

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: fôrs, IPA(key): /fɔɹs/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɔːs/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: fōrs, IPA(key): /fo(ː)ɹs/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /foəs/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)s

Etymology 1

From Middle English force, fors, forse, from Old French force, from Late Latin or Vulgar Latin *fortia, from neuter plural of Latin fortis (strong), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (to rise, high, hill).

Noun

force (countable and uncountable, plural forces)

  1. Strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigour; might; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect.
  2. Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, part II
      which now they hold by force, and not by right
  3. (countable) Anything that is able to make a substantial change in a person or thing.
  4. (countable, physics) A physical quantity that denotes ability to push, pull, twist or accelerate a body and which has a direction and is measured in a unit dimensioned in mass × distance/time² (ML/T²): SI: newton (N); CGS: dyne (dyn)
  5. Something or anything that has the power to produce a physical effect upon something else, such as causing it to move or change shape.
  6. (countable) A group that aims to attack, control, or constrain.
    • 1611, William Shakespeare, Cymbeline
      Is Lucius general of the forces?
  7. (uncountable) The ability to attack, control, or constrain.
  8. (countable) A magic trick in which the outcome is known to the magician beforehand, especially one involving the apparent free choice of a card by another person.
  9. (law) Legal validity.
  10. (law) Either unlawful violence, as in a “forced entry“, or lawful compulsion.
  11. (linguistics, semantics, pragmatics) Ability of an utterance or its element (word, form, prosody, …) to effect a given meaning.
  12. (humorous or science fiction, with the, often capitalized) A metaphysical and ubiquitous power from the fictional Star Wars universe created by George Lucas. See usage note. [1977]
  13. Synonym of police force (typically with preceding “the”)
Usage notes
  • Adjectives often applied to “force”: military, cultural, economic, gravitational, electric, magnetic, strong, weak, positive, negative, attractive, repulsive, good, evil, dark, physical, muscular, spiritual, intellectual, mental, emotional, rotational, tremendous, huge.
  • (science fiction): Outside of fiction, the force may be used as an alternative to invoking luck, destiny, or God. For example, the force was with him instead of luck was on his side, or may the force be with you instead of may God be with you.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • may the Force be with you
  • workforce
Related terms
Translations

References

  • force on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

From Middle English forcen, from Old French forcer, from Late Latin *fortiāre, from Latin fortia.

Verb

force (third-person singular simple present forces, present participle forcing, simple past and past participle forced)

  1. (transitive) To violate (a woman); to rape. [from 14thc.]
  2. (obsolete, reflexive, intransitive) To exert oneself, to do one’s utmost. [from 14thc.]
    • And I pray you for my sake to force yourselff there, that men may speke you worshyp.
  3. (transitive) To compel (someone or something) to do something. [from 15thc.]
    • 2011, Tim Webb & Fiona Harvey, The Guardian, 23 March:
      Housebuilders had warned that the higher costs involved would have forced them to build fewer homes and priced many homebuyers out of the market.
  4. (transitive) To constrain by force; to overcome the limitations or resistance of. [from 16thc.]
  5. (transitive) To drive (something) by force, to propel (generally + prepositional phrase or adverb). [from 16thc.]
    • It stuck so fast, so deeply buried lay / That scarce the victor forced the steel away.
    • Ethelbert [] ordered that none should be forced into religion.
    • 2007, The Guardian, 4 November:
      In a groundbreaking move, the Pentagon is compensating servicemen seriously hurt when an American tank convoy forced them off the road.
  6. (transitive) To cause to occur (despite inertia, resistance etc.); to produce through force. [from 16thc.]
    • 2009, “All things to Althingi”, The Economist, 23 July:
      The second problem is the economy, the shocking state of which has forced the decision to apply to the EU.
  7. (transitive) To forcibly open (a door, lock etc.). [from 17thc.]
  8. To obtain or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress.
  9. (transitive, baseball) To create an out by touching a base in advance of a runner who has no base to return to while in possession of a ball which has already touched the ground.
  10. (whist) To compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit that he/she does not hold.
  11. (archaic) To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce.
  12. (archaic) To provide with forces; to reinforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison.
  13. (obsolete) To allow the force of; to value; to care for.
Derived terms
  • enforce
  • forceful
  • forcible
Translations

See also

  • Imperial unit: foot pound
  • metric unit: newton
  • coerce: To control by force.

Etymology 3

From Middle English force, forz, fors, from Old Norse fors (waterfall), from Proto-Germanic *fursaz (waterfall). Cognate with Icelandic foss (waterfall), Norwegian foss (waterfall), Swedish fors (waterfall). Doublet of foss.

Noun

force (plural forces)

  1. (countable, Northern England) A waterfall or cascade.
    • 1778, Thomas West, A Guide to the Lakes in Cumberland, Westmorland, and Lancashire
      to see the falls or force of the river Kent
Derived terms
  • forcefall
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English forcen, forsen, a use of force, with confusion of farce (to stuff).

Verb

force (third-person singular simple present forces, present participle forcing, simple past and past participle forced)

  1. To stuff; to lard; to farce.

Derived terms

  • forcemeat

Further reading

  • force at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • force in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • force in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Cofer, Corfe, corfe

French

Etymology

From Middle French force, from Old French force, from Late Latin or Vulgar Latin *fortia, re-analyzed as a feminine singular from the neuter plural of Latin fortis. Compare Catalan força, Portuguese força, Italian forza, Spanish fuerza.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔʁs/
  • Rhymes: -ɔʁs
  • Homophones: forcent, forces

Noun

force f (plural forces)

  1. force
  2. strength

Synonyms

  • pouvoir
  • puissance
  • violence

Derived terms

Adjective

force (invariable)

  1. (archaic) Many; a lot of; a great quantity of.

Verb

force

  1. first/third-person singular present indicative of forcer
  2. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of forcer
  3. second-person singular imperative of forcer

Further reading

  • “force” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French force.

Noun

force f (plural forces)

  1. force (physical effort; physical might)

Descendants

  • French: force

Old French

Alternative forms

  • forche (Picardy, Old Northern French)
  • fors

Etymology

From Late Latin or Vulgar Latin *fortia, re-analyzed as a feminine singular from the neuter plural of Latin fortis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɔr.t͡sə/

Noun

force f (oblique plural forces, nominative singular force, nominative plural forces)

  1. strength; might

Related terms

  • esforcer
  • esfort
  • fort
  • forteresce

Descendants

  • Middle French: force
    • French: force
  • Walloon: foice
  • Middle English: force / fors / forse
    • English: force

Portuguese

Verb

force

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of forçar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of forçar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of forçar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of forçar


English

Etymology

From earlier squize, squise (whence also dialectal English squizzen and squeege), first attested around 1600, probably an alteration of quease (which is attested since 1550), from Middle English queisen (to squeeze), from Old English cwēsan, cwȳsan (to crush, squeeze), of unknown origin, perhaps imitative (compare Swedish qväsa, kväsa (to squeeze, bruise, crush; quell), Dutch kwetsen (to injure, hurt), German quetschen (to squeeze)). Compare also French esquicher from Old Occitan esquichar (to press, squeeze). The slang expression “to put the squeeze on (someone or something)”, meaning “to exert influence”, is from 1711. The baseball term “squeeze play” is first recorded 1905. “Main squeeze” (“most important person”) is attested from 1896, the specific meaning “one’s sweetheart, lover” is attested by 1980.

The nonstandard strong forms squoze and squozen, attested dialectally since at least the mid-19th century, are by analogy with freeze.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /skwiːz/
  • Rhymes: -iːz

Verb

squeeze (third-person singular simple present squeezes, present participle squeezing, simple past squeezed or (nonstandard) squoze, past participle squeezed or (nonstandard) squozen)

  1. (transitive) To apply pressure to from two or more sides at once.
    I squeezed the ball between my hands.
    Please don’t squeeze the toothpaste tube in the middle.
    • 1922, Virginia Woolf, Jacob’s Room Chapter 1:
      “Over there—by the rock,” Steele muttered, with his brush between his teeth, squeezing out raw sienna, and keeping his eyes fixed on Betty Flanders’s back.
  2. (transitive) To embrace closely; to give a tight hug to.
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To fit into a tight place.
    I managed to squeeze the car into that parking space.
    Can you squeeze through that gap?
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows:
      Could he not squeeze under the seat of a carriage? He had seen this method adopted by schoolboys, when the journey- money provided by thoughtful parents had been diverted to other and better ends.
  4. (transitive) To remove something with difficulty, or apparent difficulty.
    He squeezed some money out of his wallet.
  5. (transitive) To put in a difficult position by presenting two or more choices.
    I’m being squeezed between my job and my volunteer work.
    • 2013 May 23, Sarah Lyall, “British Leader’s Liberal Turn Sets Off a Rebellion in His Party,” New York Times (retrieved 29 May 2013):
      At a time when Mr. Cameron is being squeezed from both sides — from the right by members of his own party and by the anti-immigrant, anti-Europe U.K. Independence Party, and from the left by his Liberal Democrat coalition partners — the move seemed uncharacteristically clunky.
  6. (transitive, figuratively) To oppress with hardships, burdens, or taxes; to harass.
  7. (transitive, baseball) To attempt to score a runner from third by bunting.
    Jones squeezed in Smith with a perfect bunt.
Synonyms
  • (to apply pressure to from two or more sides at once): compress, condense; see also Thesaurus:compress

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

squeeze (plural squeezes)

  1. A close or tight fit.
  2. (figuratively) A difficult position.
  3. A hug or other affectionate grasp.
  4. (slang) A romantic partner.
    • 1988, James Ellroy, Dudley Smith Trio: The Big Nowhere, LA Confidential, White Jazz, Random House (→ISBN), page 459:
      He spent nights cruising queer bars near the pad, saw Wiltsie at the dives, but always in the company of his squeeze, a guy he called ‘Duane.’
    • 2012, J. Lamar, Tip Tap Toe, Xlibris Corporation (→ISBN), page 141:
      His young squeeze had just backed out and had not seen the assault on her “ sugar daddy” when it happened!
    • 2014, N. Lombardi Jr., Journey Towards a Falling Sun, John Hunt Publishing (→ISBN)
      But even considering that, he might have been a bit more restrained if he hadn’t run into his former sexy squeeze, Penny Atieno.
  5. (slang) An illicit alcoholic drink made by squeezing Sterno through cheesecloth, etc., and mixing the result with fruit juice.
  6. (baseball) The act of bunting in an attempt to score a runner from third.
  7. (card games) A play that forces an opponent to discard a card that gives up one or more tricks.
  8. (caving) A traversal of a narrow passage.
  9. A moulding, cast or other impression of an object, chiefly a design, inscription etc., especially by pressing wet paper onto the surface and peeling off when dry.
    • 1828, JT Smith, Nollekens and His Times, Century Hutchinson 1986, p. 65:
      Nollekens, finding his wife always benefited by these visits, never refused White a squeeze of a patera, or any thing that would answer his purpose; [] White [] had turned his wine-cellars into manufactories for the produce of cast coins, and moderns squeezes from Roman lamps.
  10. (mining) The gradual closing of workings by the weight of the overlying strata.
  11. (dated) The situation experienced by a middleman when pressured from both sides, especially financially.
  12. (dated) A bribe, fee, or extortionary price paid to a middleman, especially in China; the practice of requiring such a bribe or fee.

Translations

See also

  • squash
  • squeegee
  • squish
  • margin squeeze

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