force vs violence what difference

what is difference between force and violence

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: fôrs, IPA(key): /fɔɹs/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɔːs/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: fōrs, IPA(key): /fo(ː)ɹs/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /foəs/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)s

Etymology 1

From Middle English force, fors, forse, from Old French force, from Late Latin or Vulgar Latin *fortia, from neuter plural of Latin fortis (strong), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (to rise, high, hill).

Noun

force (countable and uncountable, plural forces)

  1. Strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigour; might; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect.
  2. Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, part II
      which now they hold by force, and not by right
  3. (countable) Anything that is able to make a substantial change in a person or thing.
  4. (countable, physics) A physical quantity that denotes ability to push, pull, twist or accelerate a body and which has a direction and is measured in a unit dimensioned in mass × distance/time² (ML/T²): SI: newton (N); CGS: dyne (dyn)
  5. Something or anything that has the power to produce a physical effect upon something else, such as causing it to move or change shape.
  6. (countable) A group that aims to attack, control, or constrain.
    • 1611, William Shakespeare, Cymbeline
      Is Lucius general of the forces?
  7. (uncountable) The ability to attack, control, or constrain.
  8. (countable) A magic trick in which the outcome is known to the magician beforehand, especially one involving the apparent free choice of a card by another person.
  9. (law) Legal validity.
  10. (law) Either unlawful violence, as in a “forced entry“, or lawful compulsion.
  11. (linguistics, semantics, pragmatics) Ability of an utterance or its element (word, form, prosody, …) to effect a given meaning.
  12. (humorous or science fiction, with the, often capitalized) A metaphysical and ubiquitous power from the fictional Star Wars universe created by George Lucas. See usage note. [1977]
  13. Synonym of police force (typically with preceding “the”)
Usage notes
  • Adjectives often applied to “force”: military, cultural, economic, gravitational, electric, magnetic, strong, weak, positive, negative, attractive, repulsive, good, evil, dark, physical, muscular, spiritual, intellectual, mental, emotional, rotational, tremendous, huge.
  • (science fiction): Outside of fiction, the force may be used as an alternative to invoking luck, destiny, or God. For example, the force was with him instead of luck was on his side, or may the force be with you instead of may God be with you.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • may the Force be with you
  • workforce
Related terms
Translations

References

  • force on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

From Middle English forcen, from Old French forcer, from Late Latin *fortiāre, from Latin fortia.

Verb

force (third-person singular simple present forces, present participle forcing, simple past and past participle forced)

  1. (transitive) To violate (a woman); to rape. [from 14thc.]
  2. (obsolete, reflexive, intransitive) To exert oneself, to do one’s utmost. [from 14thc.]
    • And I pray you for my sake to force yourselff there, that men may speke you worshyp.
  3. (transitive) To compel (someone or something) to do something. [from 15thc.]
    • 2011, Tim Webb & Fiona Harvey, The Guardian, 23 March:
      Housebuilders had warned that the higher costs involved would have forced them to build fewer homes and priced many homebuyers out of the market.
  4. (transitive) To constrain by force; to overcome the limitations or resistance of. [from 16thc.]
  5. (transitive) To drive (something) by force, to propel (generally + prepositional phrase or adverb). [from 16thc.]
    • It stuck so fast, so deeply buried lay / That scarce the victor forced the steel away.
    • Ethelbert [] ordered that none should be forced into religion.
    • 2007, The Guardian, 4 November:
      In a groundbreaking move, the Pentagon is compensating servicemen seriously hurt when an American tank convoy forced them off the road.
  6. (transitive) To cause to occur (despite inertia, resistance etc.); to produce through force. [from 16thc.]
    • 2009, “All things to Althingi”, The Economist, 23 July:
      The second problem is the economy, the shocking state of which has forced the decision to apply to the EU.
  7. (transitive) To forcibly open (a door, lock etc.). [from 17thc.]
  8. To obtain or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress.
  9. (transitive, baseball) To create an out by touching a base in advance of a runner who has no base to return to while in possession of a ball which has already touched the ground.
  10. (whist) To compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit that he/she does not hold.
  11. (archaic) To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce.
  12. (archaic) To provide with forces; to reinforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison.
  13. (obsolete) To allow the force of; to value; to care for.
Derived terms
  • enforce
  • forceful
  • forcible
Translations

See also

  • Imperial unit: foot pound
  • metric unit: newton
  • coerce: To control by force.

Etymology 3

From Middle English force, forz, fors, from Old Norse fors (waterfall), from Proto-Germanic *fursaz (waterfall). Cognate with Icelandic foss (waterfall), Norwegian foss (waterfall), Swedish fors (waterfall). Doublet of foss.

Noun

force (plural forces)

  1. (countable, Northern England) A waterfall or cascade.
    • 1778, Thomas West, A Guide to the Lakes in Cumberland, Westmorland, and Lancashire
      to see the falls or force of the river Kent
Derived terms
  • forcefall
Translations

Etymology 4

From Middle English forcen, forsen, a use of force, with confusion of farce (to stuff).

Verb

force (third-person singular simple present forces, present participle forcing, simple past and past participle forced)

  1. To stuff; to lard; to farce.

Derived terms

  • forcemeat

Further reading

  • force at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • force in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • force in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Cofer, Corfe, corfe

French

Etymology

From Middle French force, from Old French force, from Late Latin or Vulgar Latin *fortia, re-analyzed as a feminine singular from the neuter plural of Latin fortis. Compare Catalan força, Portuguese força, Italian forza, Spanish fuerza.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔʁs/
  • Rhymes: -ɔʁs
  • Homophones: forcent, forces

Noun

force f (plural forces)

  1. force
  2. strength

Synonyms

  • pouvoir
  • puissance
  • violence

Derived terms

Adjective

force (invariable)

  1. (archaic) Many; a lot of; a great quantity of.

Verb

force

  1. first/third-person singular present indicative of forcer
  2. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of forcer
  3. second-person singular imperative of forcer

Further reading

  • “force” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French force.

Noun

force f (plural forces)

  1. force (physical effort; physical might)

Descendants

  • French: force

Old French

Alternative forms

  • forche (Picardy, Old Northern French)
  • fors

Etymology

From Late Latin or Vulgar Latin *fortia, re-analyzed as a feminine singular from the neuter plural of Latin fortis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɔr.t͡sə/

Noun

force f (oblique plural forces, nominative singular force, nominative plural forces)

  1. strength; might

Related terms

  • esforcer
  • esfort
  • fort
  • forteresce

Descendants

  • Middle French: force
    • French: force
  • Walloon: foice
  • Middle English: force / fors / forse
    • English: force

Portuguese

Verb

force

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of forçar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of forçar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of forçar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of forçar


English

Etymology

From Middle English violence, from Old French violence, from Latin violentia, from adjective violentus, see violent.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈvaɪələns/, /ˈvaɪləns/
  • (obsolete or poetic) IPA(key): /ˈvaɪəˌlɛns/, /ˈvaɪˌlɛns/
  • Rhymes: -aɪələns, -aɪləns

Noun

violence (countable and uncountable, plural violences)

  1. Extreme force.
  2. Action which causes destruction, pain, or suffering.
  3. Widespread fighting.
  4. (figuratively) Injustice, wrong.
    • 2017, Kevin J. O’Brien, The Violence of Climate Change
      Racism, classism, sexism, ethnocentrism, and heterosexism are also wicked problems of structural violence []
  5. (obsolete) ravishment; rape; violation

Antonyms

  • (action intended to cause destruction, pain or suffering): peace, nonviolence

Hypernyms

  • (extreme force): force

Related terms

  • violent
  • violate
  • violation

Translations

See also

  • domestic violence
  • reverse domestic violence

Verb

violence (third-person singular simple present violences, present participle violencing, simple past and past participle violenced)

  1. (nonstandard) To subject to violence.
    • 1996, Professor Cathy Nutbrown, Respectful Educators – Capable Learners: Children’s Rights and Early Education, SAGE →ISBN, page 36:
      The key general point is that the idea of the agendered, asexual, aviolenced worker is a fiction; workers and organizational members do not exist in social abstraction; they are gendered, sexualed and violenced, partly by their position  …
    • 2011, Timothy D. Forsyth, The Alien, AuthorHouse →ISBN, page 24:
      And the triad is made complete by she who is violenced by him.
    • 2012, Megan Sweeney, The Story Within Us: Women Prisoners Reflect on Reading, University of Illinois Press →ISBN, page 46:
      He physically violenced my mother, physically violenced me and my brothers, and was sexually abusive to me until I was in second grade.

References

  • violence at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • violence in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • “violence” in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 329.
  • violence in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Etymology

From Old French violence, from Latin violentia, from the adjective violentus, see violent.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vjɔ.lɑ̃s/
  • Homophone: violences

Noun

violence f (plural violences)

  1. (uncountable) violence
  2. (countable) act of violence

Synonyms

  • ardeur
  • brutalité
  • force
  • fougue
  • fureur
  • sévices
  • virulence

Antonyms

  • douceur

Derived terms

  • faire violence
  • plus fait douceur que violence
  • violence conjugale

Related terms

  • violemment
  • violent
  • violenter

Further reading

  • “violence” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • violens, vyolence, vyolens, vyalens, wiolence, violense

Etymology

From Old French violence, from Latin violentia.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌviːɔlˈɛns(ə)/, /ˌviːəlˈɛns(ə)/, /viəlˈɛns(ə)/, /ˈviːəlɛns(ə)/

Noun

violence (uncountable)

  1. Violence (harmful manual force) or an example of it.
  2. A harmful force of nature; great natural force.
  3. Divine or religious force or strength.
  4. The force or power of one’s feelings or mental state.
  5. Powerful or forceful movement or mobility.
  6. Misrule or malgovernance; abuse of authority.
  7. (rare) Beneficial manual force.
  8. (rare) The strength of an ache.
  9. (rare) The whims of chance.

Descendants

  • English: violence

References

  • “vī̆olence, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-05-30.

Old French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin violentia.

Noun

violence f (oblique plural violences, nominative singular violence, nominative plural violences)

  1. violence
  2. act of violence

Descendants

  • Middle English: violence, violens, vyolence, vyolens, vyalens, wiolence, violense
    • English: violence
  • French: violence

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