ford vs fording what difference

what is difference between ford and fording

English

Alternative forms

  • foorth (obsolete, [14th century])

Etymology

From Middle English ford, from Old English ford, from Proto-West Germanic *furdu, from Proto-Germanic *furduz, from Proto-Indo-European *pértus (crossing).

Cognate with firth and fjord (via Old Norse), Low German Föörd, Dutch voord, German Furt, Norwegian and Danish fjord, and more distantly with English port (via Latin). See also forth and Persian پل‎.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /fɔɹd/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɔːd/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /fo(ː)ɹd/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /foəd/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)d

Noun

ford (plural fords)

  1. A location where a stream is shallow and the bottom has good footing, making it possible to cross from one side to the other with no bridge, by walking, riding, or driving through the water; a crossing.
  2. A stream; a current.
    • Permit my ghost to pass the Stygian ford.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

ford (third-person singular simple present fords, present participle fording, simple past and past participle forded)

  1. To cross a stream using a ford.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      He named that place, for it was near her dwelling, and on the road between Balerynie and Heriotside, which fords the Sker Burn.
    • 1903, Mary Hunter Austin, The Land of Little Rain, Houghton Mifflin, pp. 31-2, [1]
      Since the time of Seyavi the deer have shifted their feeding ground across the valley at the beginning of deep snows, by way of the Black Rock, fording the river at Charley’s Butte, and making straight for the mouth of the cañon that is the easiest going to the winter pastures on Waban.
    • 1982, Nadine Gordimer, “A Hunting Accident” in A Soldier’s Embrace, Penguin, p. 59,
      Ratau drove with reckless authority through the quiet morning fires of his father’s and forefathers’ town and forded a river of goats on the road leading out of it.
    • 2016, Bruce McClure and Deborah Byrd, “EarthSky’s meteor shower guide for 2016” in earthsky.org, [2]
      Some who witnessed the 1966 Leonid meteor storm said they felt as if they needed to grip the ground, so strong was the impression of Earth plowing along through space, fording the meteoroid stream.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • dorf

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *furdu, from Proto-Germanic *furduz (ford). Cognate with Old Frisian ford, Old Saxon ford, Old Dutch ford, Old High German furt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ford/, [forˠd]

Noun

ford m

  1. ford

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: ford, furd, foord
    • English: ford
    • Scots: furde, furd, fuird
  • Proto-Brythonic: *forð (road) (see there for further descendants)

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vɔrd/

Noun

ford

  1. Soft mutation of bord.

Mutation


English

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)dɪŋ

Verb

fording

  1. present participle of ford

Noun

fording (plural fordings)

  1. The act by which something is forded.
    • 1953, Aldo Leopold, Round River
      By half past seven we were both pretty nearly all in, and wet from innumerable fordings of the river, so we stopped and boiled some hot water with the sugar left over from lunch.
  2. Fording place
    • 1910, Rabindranath Tagore, Gitanjali in Gitanjali and Fruit-Gathering, New York: Macmillan, 1918, p. 69, [1]
      There at the fording in the little boat the unknown man plays upon his lute.

Old Irish

Etymology

From for- +‎ dingid.

Verb

for·ding

  1. to crush, to oppress

Inflection

References

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “fording”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

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