fore vs forward what difference

what is difference between fore and forward

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɔː/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /fɔɹ/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /fo(ː)ɹ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /foə/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)
  • Homophones: four, for (in accents with the horse–hoarse merger)

Etymology

A development of the prefix fore-.

Adjective

fore (comparative former, superlative foremost)

  1. (obsolete) Former; occurring earlier (in some order); previous. [15th-18th c.]
  2. Forward; situated towards the front (of something). [from 16th c.]
    • 1969, Vladimir Nabokov, Ada or Ardor, Penguin 2011, p. 23:
      Crystal vases with crimson roses and golden-brown asters were set here and there in the fore part of the shop []
Antonyms
  • (order): latter
  • (location): aft
Translations

Interjection

fore

  1. (golf) An exclamation yelled to inform players a ball is moving in their direction.
Translations

Noun

fore (uncountable)

  1. The front; the forward part of something; the foreground.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      The waiting-room was now less empty than Watt had at first supposed, to judge by the presence, some two paces to Watt’s fore, and as many to his right, of what seemed to be an object of some importance.
    • 2002, Mark Bevir, The Logic of the History of Ideas:
      People face a dilemma whenever they bring to the fore an understanding that appears inadequate in the light of the other beliefs they bring to bear on it.
Related terms
  • fore-and-aft
  • foremost
  • forehead
Translations

Adverb

fore (not comparable)

  1. In the part that precedes or goes first; opposed to aft, after, back, behind, etc.
  2. (obsolete) Formerly; previously; afore.
  3. (nautical) In or towards the bows of a ship.

Anagrams

  • Fero, Freo, OFer, froe, o-fer, ofer, orfe

Cornish

Noun

fore

  1. Mixed mutation of bore.

Esperanto

Etymology

for +‎ -e

Adverb

fore

  1. far away

French

Verb

fore

  1. first-person singular present indicative of forer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of forer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of forer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of forer
  5. second-person singular imperative of forer

Ido

Etymology

for +‎ -e

Adverb

fore

  1. (far) away, afar

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈfo.re/, [ˈfɔɾɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈfo.re/, [ˈfɔːrɛ]

Etymology 1

See foris.

Noun

fore

  1. ablative singular of foris

Etymology 2

Formally present active infinitive corresponding to fuī (I have been), irregular perfect indicative of sum (I am). From Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH- (to become, be), cognate with Old English bēo (I become, I will be, I am). In classical Latin, the fu- forms of sum are mostly limited to the perfect tenses, but old Latin has alternate present and imperfect subjunctive forms fuam and forem (for classical sim and essem) suggesting the root could once be fully conjugated. After being incorporated in the conjugation of sum, the meaning of fore shifted from the original “to become” to the classical “to be going to be”.

Alternative forms

  • futūrus esse

Verb

fore

  1. future active infinitive of sum
Usage notes
  • Also used in the construction fore ut in place of a future passive infinitive in indirect discourse:

References

  • fore in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fore in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fore in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • fore in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Middle English

Noun

fore

  1. fore

Descendants

  • Scots: fore
  • English: fore

Numeral

fore

  1. four

Conjunction

fore

  1. therefore

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

Alternative forms

  • fóre

Noun

fore f (definite singular fora, indefinite plural forer, definite plural forene)

  1. behaviour
  2. footprints, tracks
  3. (economics) ability, standing

Etymology 2

Derived from for (travel), from Old Norse fǫr, but made a weak noun. From earlier Proto-Germanic *farō.

Alternative forms

  • fòre

Noun

fore f (definite singular fora, indefinite plural forer, definite plural forene)

  1. alternative form of for

Etymology 3

From fòr (furrow).

Alternative forms

  • fora, fòra, fòre

Verb

fore (present tense forar, past tense fora, past participle fora, passive infinitive forast, present participle forande, imperative for)

  1. to furrow

Etymology 4

Inherited from Old Norse fóðra.

Alternative forms

  • fora, fôra, fôre

Verb

fore (present tense forar, past tense fora, past participle fora, passive infinitive forast, present participle forande, imperative for)

  1. to fodder animals
    1. to breed, raise
  2. to gather food, fodder
  3. to feed
Related terms
  • fôr n (fodder)

Etymology 5

Made from fôr (lining of clothes)

Alternative forms

  • fora, fôra, fôre

Verb

fore (present tense forar, past tense fora, past participle fora, passive infinitive forast, present participle forande, imperative for)

  1. (transitive) to line (clothes)
  2. (transitive) to clad with covering layers

Etymology 6

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Adjective

fore

  1. inflection of for:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

References

  • “fore” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Verb

fore

  1. past subjunctive of fara

Anagrams

  • efor

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales, standard, colloquial) IPA(key): /ˈvɔrɛ/
    • (North Wales, colloquial) IPA(key): /ˈvɔra/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /ˈvoːrɛ/, /ˈvɔrɛ/

Noun

fore

  1. Soft mutation of bore (morning).

Mutation


English

Alternative forms

  • foreward (obsolete)
  • forrard, forrad, forred (dialect or nautical)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɔː.wəd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɔɹ.wɚd/, (nonstandard) /ˈfoʊ.wɚd/, (dated) /ˈfɔɹɚd/
  • (General Australian, Estuary English, General New Zealand) IPA(key): /ˈfoːwəd/
  • (General New Zealand, unstressed) IPA(key): /foːd/
  • Homophone: foreword
  • Hyphenation: for‧ward

Etymology 1

From Middle English foreward, from Old English foreweard (forward, inclined to the front, fore, early, former), from Proto-Germanic *fura- (fore-), *warþaz (turned), equivalent to fore +‎ -ward. Cognate with Dutch voorwaarts (forward), German vorwärts (forward).

Adjective

forward (comparative more forward, superlative most forward)

  1. Situated toward or at the front of something.
    the forward gun in a ship, the forward ship in a fleet
    1. (of troops, guns etc.) Situated toward or near the enemy lines.
      The forward battalion took a hammering.
  2. Acting in or pertaining to the direction in which someone or something is facing.
    My forward vision is fine, but my peripheral vision is poor.
  3. Acting in or pertaining to the direction of travel or movement.
    forward motion, forward thrust, forward momentum
  4. (figuratively) Moving in the desired direction of progress.
    This is an important forward step for the country.
  5. Having the usual order or sequence.
    The front of the fire engine has backward writing, that can be read in a mirror, as well as forward writing.
  6. (finance, commerce) Expected or scheduled to take place in the future.
  7. Advanced beyond the usual degree; advanced for the season; precocious.
  8. Without customary restraint or modesty; bold, cheeky, pert, presumptuous or pushy.
    • 1999:, Neil Gaiman, Stardust, pg. 44 (2001 Perennial paperback edition)
      “Would you think it forward of me to kiss you?” asked Tristran.
  9. (obsolete) Ready; prompt; ardently inclined; in a bad sense, eager or hasty. [to 19th century]
    • Only they would that we should remember the poor; the same which I also was forward to do.
Usage notes
  • The superlative forwardmost can be used for the “toward or at the front” sense. There does not appear to be a forwardmore. The comparative forwarder and superlative forwardest exist for certain senses, but are relatively uncommon.
Synonyms
  • (at the front): anterior, front
  • (expected in the future): forecast, predicted
  • (without customary restraint): bold, fresh, impertinent, brazen
Antonyms
  • (at the front): back, posterior, rear
  • (expected in the future): past
  • (without customary restraint): restrained
Translations

Adverb

forward (comparative further forward, superlative furthest forward)

  1. At, near or towards the front of something.
    • A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor; as, again, the arm-chair in which Bunting now sat forward, staring into the dull, small fire. In fact, that arm-chair had been an extravagance of Mrs. Bunting. She had wanted her husband to be comfortable after the day’s work was done, and she had paid thirty-seven shillings for the chair.
    1. (nautical) At, near, or towards the bow of a vessel (with the frame of reference within the vessel).
  2. In the direction in which someone or something is facing.
    I leant forward to get a better look.
    The grandfather clock toppled forward and crashed to the ground.
  3. In the desired or usual direction of movement or progress, physically or figuratively; onwards.
  4. So that front and back are in the usual orientation.
    Don’t wear your baseball cap backward; turn it forward.
  5. In the usual order or sequence.
  6. Into the future.
  7. To an earlier point in time. See also bring forward.
Synonyms
  • (towards the front): forwards
  • (in the usual direction of progress): ahead, forth, on, onward, onwards
  • (into the future): forth, forwards, hereon, on, onward, onwards
Antonyms
  • (towards the front): back, backward, backwards, rearwards
  • (in the usual direction of progress): back, backward, backwards, rearwards, in reverse
  • (into the future): backward, backwards, into the past
  • (earlier in time): back
Hyponyms
  • straightforward
Derived terms
  • cab forward
  • forwards (adverb)
  • look forward
  • look forward to
Translations

Verb

forward (third-person singular simple present forwards, present participle forwarding, simple past and past participle forwarded)

  1. (transitive) To advance, promote.
    He did all he could to forward the interests of the school.
    • 1941, W Somerset Maugham, Up at the Villa, Vintage 2004, p. 26:
      Mary had a suspicion that this plan had been arranged beforehand, for she knew how the lewd old woman loved to forward love affairs […].
  2. (transitive) To send (a letter, email etc.) on to a third party.
    I’ll be glad to forward your mail to you while you’re gone.
  3. (transitive, bookbinding) To assemble (a book) by sewing sections, attaching cover boards, and so on.
Synonyms
  • (send (something received) on to a third party): pass on
Derived terms
  • fast forward
  • forwarding address
  • freight forwarder
  • forward contract
Descendants
  • Dutch: forwarden
Translations

Noun

forward (plural forwards)

  1. (rugby) One of the eight players (comprising two props, one hooker, two locks, two flankers and one number eight, collectively known as the pack) whose primary task is to gain and maintain possession of the ball (compare back).
  2. (soccer) A player on a team in football (soccer) in the row nearest to the opposing team’s goal, who are therefore principally responsible for scoring goals.
    Synonyms: attacker, centre forward, striker
  3. (ice hockey) An umbrella term for a centre or winger in ice hockey.
  4. (basketball) The small forward or power forward position; two frontcourt positions that are taller than guards but shorter than centers.
  5. (nautical) The front part of a vessel.
  6. (Internet) An e-mail message that is forwarded to another recipient or recipients; an electronic chain letter.
    • 2004, Tamara Stevens, What Is Snail Mail?: The Lost Art of Letterwriting (page 27)
      When you receive your new pen-pal’s email address, do not automatically put it in your address book and use the email Addy to send ‘forwards’ to. Not every pen pal likes ‘forwards’, especially jokes and meaningless emails.
  7. (finance) A direct agreement between two parties to buy or sell an asset at a specific point in the future; distinguished from a futures contract in that the latter is standardized and traded on an exchange.
    Synonym: forward contract
  8. Misconstruction of foreword (preface or introduction).
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English foreward, from Old English foreweard (condition, bargain, agreement, contract, treaty, assurance), equivalent to fore- +‎ ward (ward, keeping). Cognate with Scots forward (covenant, compact), Dutch voorwaarde (condition, terms, proviso, stipulation). More at fore-, ward.

Noun

forward (plural forwards)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Agreement; covenant.

References

  • forward at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • forward in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Warford, froward

Czech

Alternative forms

  • forvard

Etymology

Borrowed from English forward.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈforvart/
  • Hyphenation: for‧ward

Noun

forward m anim

  1. (soccer, ice hockey) forward

Declension

Derived terms

  • forwardka

Noun

forward m inan

  1. (soccer, ice hockey) forward line
  2. (business) forward contract

Declension

Synonyms

  • (sport): útok, ofenziva
  • (contract): forwardový kontrakt

Antonyms

  • (sport): obrana

Derived terms

  • forwardový

Further reading

  • forward in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957

Middle English

Etymology 1

Adjective

forward

  1. Alternative form of foreward

Adverb

forward

  1. Alternative form of foreward

Etymology 2

Noun

forward (plural forwards)

  1. Alternative form of foreward

Etymology 3

Noun

forward (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of forwird

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