fore vs stem what difference

what is difference between fore and stem

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɔː/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /fɔɹ/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /fo(ː)ɹ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /foə/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)
  • Homophones: four, for (in accents with the horse–hoarse merger)

Etymology

A development of the prefix fore-.

Adjective

fore (comparative former, superlative foremost)

  1. (obsolete) Former; occurring earlier (in some order); previous. [15th-18th c.]
  2. Forward; situated towards the front (of something). [from 16th c.]
    • 1969, Vladimir Nabokov, Ada or Ardor, Penguin 2011, p. 23:
      Crystal vases with crimson roses and golden-brown asters were set here and there in the fore part of the shop []
Antonyms
  • (order): latter
  • (location): aft
Translations

Interjection

fore

  1. (golf) An exclamation yelled to inform players a ball is moving in their direction.
Translations

Noun

fore (uncountable)

  1. The front; the forward part of something; the foreground.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      The waiting-room was now less empty than Watt had at first supposed, to judge by the presence, some two paces to Watt’s fore, and as many to his right, of what seemed to be an object of some importance.
    • 2002, Mark Bevir, The Logic of the History of Ideas:
      People face a dilemma whenever they bring to the fore an understanding that appears inadequate in the light of the other beliefs they bring to bear on it.
Related terms
  • fore-and-aft
  • foremost
  • forehead
Translations

Adverb

fore (not comparable)

  1. In the part that precedes or goes first; opposed to aft, after, back, behind, etc.
  2. (obsolete) Formerly; previously; afore.
  3. (nautical) In or towards the bows of a ship.

Anagrams

  • Fero, Freo, OFer, froe, o-fer, ofer, orfe

Cornish

Noun

fore

  1. Mixed mutation of bore.

Esperanto

Etymology

for +‎ -e

Adverb

fore

  1. far away

French

Verb

fore

  1. first-person singular present indicative of forer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of forer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of forer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of forer
  5. second-person singular imperative of forer

Ido

Etymology

for +‎ -e

Adverb

fore

  1. (far) away, afar

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈfo.re/, [ˈfɔɾɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈfo.re/, [ˈfɔːrɛ]

Etymology 1

See foris.

Noun

fore

  1. ablative singular of foris

Etymology 2

Formally present active infinitive corresponding to fuī (I have been), irregular perfect indicative of sum (I am). From Proto-Indo-European *bʰuH- (to become, be), cognate with Old English bēo (I become, I will be, I am). In classical Latin, the fu- forms of sum are mostly limited to the perfect tenses, but old Latin has alternate present and imperfect subjunctive forms fuam and forem (for classical sim and essem) suggesting the root could once be fully conjugated. After being incorporated in the conjugation of sum, the meaning of fore shifted from the original “to become” to the classical “to be going to be”.

Alternative forms

  • futūrus esse

Verb

fore

  1. future active infinitive of sum
Usage notes
  • Also used in the construction fore ut in place of a future passive infinitive in indirect discourse:

References

  • fore in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fore in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fore in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • fore in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Middle English

Noun

fore

  1. fore

Descendants

  • Scots: fore
  • English: fore

Numeral

fore

  1. four

Conjunction

fore

  1. therefore

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

Alternative forms

  • fóre

Noun

fore f (definite singular fora, indefinite plural forer, definite plural forene)

  1. behaviour
  2. footprints, tracks
  3. (economics) ability, standing

Etymology 2

Derived from for (travel), from Old Norse fǫr, but made a weak noun. From earlier Proto-Germanic *farō.

Alternative forms

  • fòre

Noun

fore f (definite singular fora, indefinite plural forer, definite plural forene)

  1. alternative form of for

Etymology 3

From fòr (furrow).

Alternative forms

  • fora, fòra, fòre

Verb

fore (present tense forar, past tense fora, past participle fora, passive infinitive forast, present participle forande, imperative for)

  1. to furrow

Etymology 4

Inherited from Old Norse fóðra.

Alternative forms

  • fora, fôra, fôre

Verb

fore (present tense forar, past tense fora, past participle fora, passive infinitive forast, present participle forande, imperative for)

  1. to fodder animals
    1. to breed, raise
  2. to gather food, fodder
  3. to feed
Related terms
  • fôr n (fodder)

Etymology 5

Made from fôr (lining of clothes)

Alternative forms

  • fora, fôra, fôre

Verb

fore (present tense forar, past tense fora, past participle fora, passive infinitive forast, present participle forande, imperative for)

  1. (transitive) to line (clothes)
  2. (transitive) to clad with covering layers

Etymology 6

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Adjective

fore

  1. inflection of for:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

References

  • “fore” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Verb

fore

  1. past subjunctive of fara

Anagrams

  • efor

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales, standard, colloquial) IPA(key): /ˈvɔrɛ/
    • (North Wales, colloquial) IPA(key): /ˈvɔra/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /ˈvoːrɛ/, /ˈvɔrɛ/

Noun

fore

  1. Soft mutation of bore (morning).

Mutation


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: stĕm, IPA(key): /stɛm/
  • Rhymes: -ɛm

Etymology 1

From Middle English stem, stemme, stempne, stevin, from Old English stemn, from Proto-Germanic *stamniz.

Noun

stem (plural stems)

  1. The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors.
    • 1633, George Herbert, Church Monuments
      While I do pray, learn here thy stem / And true descent.
  2. A branch of a family.
  3. An advanced or leading position; the lookout.
    • Wolsey sat at the stem more than twenty years.
  4. (botany) The above-ground stalk (technically axis) of a vascular plant, and certain anatomically similar, below-ground organs such as rhizomes, bulbs, tubers, and corms.
    • 1736, Sir Walter Raleigh, The History of the World in Five Books
      After they are shot up thirty feet in length, they spread a very large top, having no bough nor twig in the trunk or the stem.
  5. A slender supporting member of an individual part of a plant such as a flower or a leaf; also, by analogy, the shaft of a feather.
  6. A narrow part on certain man-made objects, such as a wine glass, a tobacco pipe, a spoon.
  7. (linguistics) The main part of an uninflected word to which affixes may be added to form inflections of the word. A stem often has a more fundamental root. Systematic conjugations and declensions derive from their stems.
  8. (slang) A person’s leg.
    • 2008, Lori Wilde, Rhonda Nelson, Cara Summers, August Harlequin Blaze
      She was perfectly, fuckably proportioned everywhere else, both above and below her waist. A pocket-size Venus, with the longest stems he’d ever seen on someone so dang diminutive.
  9. (slang) The penis.
  10. (typography) A vertical stroke of a letter.
  11. (music) A vertical stroke marking the length of a note in written music.
    Synonyms: tail, (obsolete) virgula
  12. (music) A premixed portion of a track for use in audio mastering and remixing.
  13. (nautical) The vertical or nearly vertical forward extension of the keel, to which the forward ends of the planks or strakes are attached.
  14. (cycling) A component on a bicycle that connects the handlebars to the bicycle fork.
  15. (anatomy) A part of an anatomic structure considered without its possible branches or ramifications.
  16. (slang) A crack pipe; or the long, hollow portion of a similar pipe (i.e. meth pipe) resembling a crack pipe.
  17. (chiefly Britain) A winder on a clock, watch, or similar mechanism.
Derived terms
Translations
References

“stem” in the Collins English Dictionary

Verb

stem (third-person singular simple present stems, present participle stemming, simple past and past participle stemmed)

  1. To remove the stem from.
  2. To be caused or derived; to originate.
  3. To descend in a family line.
  4. To direct the stem (of a ship) against; to make headway against.
  5. (obsolete) To hit with the stem of a ship; to ram.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.ii:
      As when two warlike Brigandines at sea, / With murdrous weapons arm’d to cruell fight, / Doe meete together on the watry lea, / They stemme ech other with so fell despight, / That with the shocke of their owne heedlesse might, / Their wooden ribs are shaken nigh a sonder []
  6. To ram (clay, etc.) into a blasting hole.
Synonyms
  • (to originate, stem from): to be due to, to arise from
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English stemmen, a borrowing from Old Norse stemma (to stop, stem, dam) (whence Danish stemme/stæmme (to stem, dam up)), from Proto-Germanic *stammijaną. Cognate with German stemmen, Middle Dutch stemmen, stempen. Compare stammer.

Verb

stem (third-person singular simple present stems, present participle stemming, simple past and past participle stemmed)

  1. (transitive) To stop, hinder (for instance, a river or blood).
    to stem a tide
    • [They] stem the flood with their erected breasts.
  2. (skiing) To move the feet apart and point the tips of the skis inward in order to slow down the speed or to facilitate a turn.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:hinder
Translations

Etymology 3

Noun

stem (plural stems)

  1. Alternative form of steem

Etymology 4

Acronym of science, technology, engineering, (and) mathematics.

Noun

stem (plural stems)

  1. Alternative form of STEM
    • 2015 May 29th, BBC News, How do US black students perform at school?
      Stem (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields are a particular cause for concern because within them there are more pronounced stereotypes, extreme competitiveness and gender inequities regarding the abilities and competencies of black male and female students.

Further reading

  • stem in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • stem in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “stem”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • EMTs, Mets, Smet, TEMs, mets

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɛm/

Etymology 1

From Dutch stem, from Middle Dutch stemme, from Old Dutch *stemma, from Proto-Germanic *stebnō, *stamnijō.

Noun

stem (plural stemme)

  1. vote
  2. voice

Etymology 2

From Dutch stemmen.

Verb

stem (present stem, present participle stemmende, past participle gestem)

  1. to vote

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch stemme, from Old Dutch *stemma, from Proto-Germanic *stebnō, *stamnijō. Under influence of Latin vox (voice, word), it acquired the now obsolete sense of “word”.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɛm/
  • Hyphenation: stem
  • Rhymes: -ɛm

Noun

stem f (plural stemmen, diminutive stemmetje n)

  1. voice, sound made by the mouth using airflow
  2. the ability to speak
  3. vote
  4. (obsolete) word
  5. (phonetics) voice, property formed by vibration of the vocal cords

Derived terms

  • foertstem
  • proteststem

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: stem
  • Negerhollands: stem
  • Indonesian: setem
  • Papiamentu: stèm
  • Sranan Tongo: sten

Verb

stem

  1. first-person singular present indicative of stemmen
  2. imperative of stemmen

Anagrams

  • mest, mets

Latin

Verb

stem

  1. first-person singular present active subjunctive of stō

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

stem

  1. imperative of stemme

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

stem

  1. imperative of stemme

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English stamp.

Noun

stem

  1. stamp

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