foreboding vs premonition what difference

what is difference between foreboding and premonition

English

Alternative forms

  • forboding (much less commonly used)

Etymology

From Middle English forbodyng, vorboding, equivalent to fore- +‎ boding. Compare German Vorbote (harbinger, omen).

Noun

foreboding (plural forebodings)

  1. A sense of evil to come.
    Synonym: augury
  2. An evil omen.

Translations

Adjective

foreboding (comparative more foreboding, superlative most foreboding)

  1. Of ominous significance; serving as an ill omen; foretelling of harm or difficulty.

Verb

foreboding

  1. present participle of forebode


English

Alternative forms

  • præmonition (archaic)

Etymology

Mid 15th century, from Anglo-Norman premunition, from Ecclesiastical Latin praemonitiōnem (a forewarning), form of praemonitiō, from Latin praemonitus, past participle of praemoneō, from prae (before) (English pre-) + moneō (to warn) (from which English monitor).

Compare Germanic forewarning.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: prĕm’ə-, prē’mə-nĭshʹən
  • Rhymes: -ɪʃən

Noun

premonition (plural premonitions)

  1. A clairvoyant or clairaudient experience, such as a dream, which resonates with some event in the future.
    Synonym: vision
  2. A strong intuition that something is about to happen (usually something negative, but not exclusively).
    Synonyms: bad feeling, foreboding, gut feeling, hunch, (informal) second sight

Derived terms

  • premonitory

Translations

References


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