foreign vs strange what difference

what is difference between foreign and strange

English

Alternative forms

  • forraine (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English foreyn, forein, from Old French forain, from Vulgar Latin *forānus (outsider, outlander), from Latin forās (outside, outdoors), also spelled forīs (outside, outdoors).

Displaced native Middle English elendish, ellendish (foreign) (from Old English elelendisc, compare Old English ellende (foreign), elland (foreign land)), Middle English eltheodi, eltheodish (foreign) (from Old English elþēodiġ, elþēodisc (foreign)), and non-native Middle English peregrin (foreign) (from Old French peregrin).

The silent -g- added perhaps by analogy with reign (compare also sovereign which was similarly altered). No relation with German fremd, Dutch vreemd.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfɒɹɪn/, /ˈfɒɹən/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɔɹɪn/, /ˈfɔɹən/
  • Rhymes: -ɒrən, -ɒrɪn
  • Hyphenation: for‧eign

Adjective

foreign (comparative more foreign, superlative most foreign)

  1. Located outside a country or place, especially one’s own.
    foreign markets; foreign soil
  2. Originating from, characteristic of, belonging to, or being a citizen of a country or place other than the one under discussion.
    foreign car; foreign word; foreign citizen; foreign trade
  3. Relating to a different nation.
    foreign policy; foreign navies
  4. Not characteristic of or naturally taken in by an organism or system.
    foreign body; foreign substance; foreign gene; foreign species
  5. (with to, formerly with from) Alien; strange.
  6. (obsolete) Held at a distance; excluded; exiled.
  7. (US, state law) From a different one of the states of the United States, as of a state of residence or incorporation.
  8. Belonging to a different organization, company etc.
  9. (obsolete) Outside, outdoors, outdoor.

Synonyms

  • (from a different country): overseas, international
  • (strange): alien, fremd
  • (in a place where it does not belong): extraneous

Antonyms

  • (from a different country): domestic
  • (not characteristic): native
  • (native to an area): indigenous

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

foreign (plural foreigns)

  1. A foreign person, particularly:
    1. (now informal) A foreigner: a person from another country.
      • 2011 August 30, “White House Extremely Worried About People Saying Dumb Stuff on 9/11” in Gawker:
        The messaging instructions come in two sets: one for domestics, another for the foreigns.
    2. (obsolete) An outsider: a person from another place or group.
    3. (obsolete) A non-guildmember.
  2. (obsolete) A foreign ship.
  3. (obsolete) Clipping of chamber foreign: an outhouse.
    • 1303, Richard Mannyng, Handlyng Synne, l. 7436 f.:
      Ful foule ys þat forreyne
      Þat ys comoun for al certeyne.
  4. A foreign area, particularly:
    1. (now dialect) An area of a community that lies outside the legal town or parish limits.
    2. (obsolete, usually in the plural) An area of a monastery outside its legal limits or serving as an outer court.
  5. Short for various phrases, including foreign language, foreign parts, and foreign service.

Synonyms

  • (outhouse): chamber foreign; see also Thesaurus:bathroom

Translations

References

  • “foreign, adj. and n.” in the Oxford English Dictionary (1897), Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Anagrams

  • Rengifo


English

Etymology

From Middle English straunge, strange, stronge, from Old French estrange, from Latin extrāneus (that which is on the outside). Doublet of extraneous. Cognate with French étrange (strange, foreign) and Spanish extraño (strange, foreign). Displaced native Old English seldcūþ.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: strānj; IPA(key): /stɹeɪnd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪndʒ

Adjective

strange (comparative stranger, superlative strangest)

  1. Not normal; odd, unusual, surprising, out of the ordinary.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:strange
    Antonyms: everyday, normal, (especially US) regular, standard, usual
  2. Unfamiliar, not yet part of one’s experience.
    Synonyms: new, unfamiliar, unknown
    Antonyms: familiar, known
    • 1955, Rex Stout, “The Next Witness”, in Three Witnesses, October 1994 Bantam edition, →ISBN, pages 48–49:
      She’s probably sitting there hoping a couple of strange detectives will drop in.
  3. (particle physics) Having the quantum mechanical property of strangeness.
    Hypernym: flavor
    • 2004 Frank Close, Particle Physics: A Very Short Introduction, Oxford, page 93:
      A strange quark is electrically charged, carrying an amount -1/3, as does the down quark.
  4. (mathematics) Of an attractor: having a fractal structure.
  5. (obsolete) Belonging to another country; foreign.
  6. (obsolete) Reserved; distant in deportment.
  7. (obsolete) Backward; slow.
  8. (obsolete) Not familiar; unaccustomed; inexperienced.
  9. (law) Not belonging to one.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • estrange, estranged
  • stranger

Translations

Verb

strange (third-person singular simple present stranges, present participle stranging, simple past and past participle stranged)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To alienate; to estrange.
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To be estranged or alienated.
  3. (obsolete, intransitive) To wonder; to be astonished (at something).

Derived terms

  • bestrange

Noun

strange (uncountable)

  1. (slang, uncountable) vagina
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:vagina

Anagrams

  • Sargent, Stagner, Stanger, argents, garnets, gerants, nagster, rangest

Esperanto

Etymology

stranga (strange) +‎ -e

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstranɡe/
  • Hyphenation: stran‧ge
  • Rhymes: -anɡe

Adverb

strange

  1. strangely

Middle English

Adjective

strange

  1. Alternative form of straunge

Old English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstrɑnɡe/, [ˈstrɑŋɡe]

Adjective

strange

  1. Inflected form of strang

West Flemish

Noun

strange n

  1. beach

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