forfeit vs sacrifice what difference

what is difference between forfeit and sacrifice

English

Etymology

Middle English forfait from ca. 1300, from Old French forfait (crime), originally the past participle of forfaire (to transgress), and Medieval Latin foris factum. During the 15th century, the sense shifted from the crime to the penalty for the crime.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɔː.fɪt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɔɹ.fɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)fɪt

Noun

forfeit (countable and uncountable, plural forfeits)

  1. A penalty for or consequence of a misdemeanor.
    • 1629, John Milton, On the Morning of Christ’s Nativity
      That he our deadly forfeit should release
  2. A thing forfeited; that which is taken from somebody in requital of a misdeed committed; that which is lost, or the right to which is alienated, by a crime, breach of contract, etc.
    He who murders pays the forfeit of his own life.
  3. Something deposited and redeemable by a sportive fine as part of a game.
    • Country dances and forfeits shortened the rest of the day.
  4. (obsolete, rare) Injury; wrong; mischief.
    • a. 1789, Barry St. Leger, Siege of Nicopolis
      to seek arms upon people and country that never did us any forfeit

Translations

Verb

forfeit (third-person singular simple present forfeits, present participle forfeiting, simple past and past participle forfeited or (rare) forfeit)

  1. To suffer the loss of something by wrongdoing or non-compliance
    He forfeited his last chance of an early release from jail by repeatedly attacking another inmate.
  2. To lose a contest, game, match, or other form of competition by voluntary withdrawal, by failing to attend or participate, or by violation of the rules
    Because only nine players were present, the football team was forced to forfeit the game.
  3. To be guilty of a misdeed; to be criminal; to transgress.
  4. To fail to keep an obligation.

Synonyms

  • (lose a contest): capitulate, surrender, disqualify
  • (voluntarily give up): forgo, withgo

Derived terms

Translations

Adjective

forfeit (not comparable)

  1. Lost or alienated for an offense or crime; liable to penal seizure.
    • 1867, Ralph Waldo Emerson, May-Day
      to tread the forfeit paradise

Anagrams

  • toffier


English

Etymology

From Middle English sacrificen (verb) and sacrifice (noun), from Old French sacrifice, from Latin sacrificium (sacrifice), from sacrificō (make or offer a sacrifice), from sacer (sacred, holy) + faciō (do, make).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsækɹɪfaɪs/
  • Hyphenation: sac‧ri‧fice

Verb

sacrifice (third-person singular simple present sacrifices, present participle sacrificing, simple past and past participle sacrificed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To offer (something) as a gift to a deity.
  2. (transitive) To give away (something valuable) to get at least a possibility of gaining something else of value (such as self-respect, trust, love, freedom, prosperity), or to avoid an even greater loss.
    • 1964, Holland-Dozier-Holland, Baby Don’t You Do It (Marvin Gaye)
      Don’t you break my heart / ’Cause I sacrifice to make you happy.
    • “God sacrificed His only begotten Son, so that all people might have eternal life.” (a paraphrase of John 3:16)
    • Condemned to sacrifice his childish years / To babbling ignorance, and to empty fears.
    • 1857, George Eliot, s:Scenes of Clerical Life
      The Baronet had sacrificed a large sum [] for the sake of [] making this boy his heir.
  3. (transitive) To trade (a value of higher worth) for something of lesser worth in order to gain something else valued more, such as an ally or business relationship, or to avoid an even greater loss; to sell without profit to gain something other than money.
    • 1957, Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged
      If you exchange a penny for a dollar, it is not a sacrifice; if you exchange a dollar for a penny, it is.
  4. (transitive, chess) To intentionally give up (a piece) in order to improve one’s position on the board.
  5. (transitive, baseball) To advance (a runner on base) by batting the ball so it can be fielded, placing the batter out, but with insufficient time to put the runner out.
  6. (dated, tradesmen’s slang) To sell at a price less than the cost or actual value.
  7. To destroy; to kill.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)

Synonyms

  • (to offer to a deity): Molochize
  • (to sell without profit): sell at a loss

Derived terms

  • sacrificial

Translations

Noun

sacrifice (countable and uncountable, plural sacrifices)

  1. The offering of anything to a god; a consecratory rite.
  2. The destruction or surrender of anything for the sake of something else; the devotion of something desirable to something higher, or to a calling deemed more pressing.
    the sacrifice of one’s spare time in order to volunteer
    1. (baseball) A play in which the batter is intentionally out so that one or more runners can advance around the bases.
  3. Something sacrificed.
  4. A loss of profit.
  5. (slang, dated) A sale at a price less than the cost or the actual value.

Translations


French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin sacrificium.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sa.kʁi.fis/
  • Rhymes: -is

Noun

sacrifice m (plural sacrifices)

  1. sacrifice

Related terms

  • sacrificiel
  • sacrifier

Further reading

  • “sacrifice” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latin

Adjective

sacrifice

  1. vocative masculine singular of sacrificus

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [saˈkrifit͡ʃe]

Verb

sacrifice

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of sacrifica
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of sacrifica

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