forfeit vs waive what difference

what is difference between forfeit and waive

English

Etymology

Middle English forfait from ca. 1300, from Old French forfait (crime), originally the past participle of forfaire (to transgress), and Medieval Latin foris factum. During the 15th century, the sense shifted from the crime to the penalty for the crime.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɔː.fɪt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɔɹ.fɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)fɪt

Noun

forfeit (countable and uncountable, plural forfeits)

  1. A penalty for or consequence of a misdemeanor.
    • 1629, John Milton, On the Morning of Christ’s Nativity
      That he our deadly forfeit should release
  2. A thing forfeited; that which is taken from somebody in requital of a misdeed committed; that which is lost, or the right to which is alienated, by a crime, breach of contract, etc.
    He who murders pays the forfeit of his own life.
  3. Something deposited and redeemable by a sportive fine as part of a game.
    • Country dances and forfeits shortened the rest of the day.
  4. (obsolete, rare) Injury; wrong; mischief.
    • a. 1789, Barry St. Leger, Siege of Nicopolis
      to seek arms upon people and country that never did us any forfeit

Translations

Verb

forfeit (third-person singular simple present forfeits, present participle forfeiting, simple past and past participle forfeited or (rare) forfeit)

  1. To suffer the loss of something by wrongdoing or non-compliance
    He forfeited his last chance of an early release from jail by repeatedly attacking another inmate.
  2. To lose a contest, game, match, or other form of competition by voluntary withdrawal, by failing to attend or participate, or by violation of the rules
    Because only nine players were present, the football team was forced to forfeit the game.
  3. To be guilty of a misdeed; to be criminal; to transgress.
  4. To fail to keep an obligation.

Synonyms

  • (lose a contest): capitulate, surrender, disqualify
  • (voluntarily give up): forgo, withgo

Derived terms

Translations

Adjective

forfeit (not comparable)

  1. Lost or alienated for an offense or crime; liable to penal seizure.
    • 1867, Ralph Waldo Emerson, May-Day
      to tread the forfeit paradise

Anagrams

  • toffier


English

Alternative forms

  • wave (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: wāv, IPA(key): /weɪv/
  • Rhymes: -eɪv
  • Homophone: wave

Etymology 1

From Middle English weyven (to avoid, renounce), from Anglo-Norman weyver (to abandon, allow to become a waif), from waif (waif).

Verb

waive (third-person singular simple present waives, present participle waiving, simple past and past participle waived)

  1. (transitive, law) To relinquish (a right etc.); to give up claim to; to forgo.
    If you waive the right to be silent, anything you say can be used against you in a court of law.
    1. (particularly) To relinquish claim on a payment or fee which would otherwise be due.
  2. (now rare) To put aside, avoid.
    • a. 1683, Isaac Barrow, Sermon LIX, “Of obedience to our spiritual guides and governors”:
      [] seeing in many such occasions of common life we advisedly do renounce or waive our own opinions, absolutely yielding to the direction of others
  3. (obsolete) To outlaw (someone).
  4. (obsolete) To abandon, give up (someone or something).
Derived terms
  • waivable
  • waiver
Related terms
  • waiver
  • waif
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English weyven (to wave, waver), from Old Norse veifa (to wave, swing) (Norwegian veiva), from Proto-Germanic *waibijaną.

Verb

waive (third-person singular simple present waives, present participle waiving, simple past and past participle waived)

  1. (obsolete) To move from side to side; to sway.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To stray, wander.
    • c. 1390, Geoffrey Chaucer, “The Merchant’s Tale”, Canterbury Tales:
      ye been so ful of sapience / That yow ne liketh, for youre heighe prudence, / To weyven fro the word of Salomon.
Translations

Etymology 3

From Anglo-Norman waive, probably as the past participle of weyver, as Etymology 1, above.

Noun

waive (plural waives)

  1. (obsolete, law) A woman put out of the protection of the law; an outlawed woman.
  2. (obsolete) A waif; a castaway.
    • [] what a wretched, and disconsolate hermitage is that house, which is not visited by thee, and what a waive and stray is that man, that hath not thy marks upon him?
Translations

Anagrams

  • aview

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