forge vs hammer what difference

what is difference between forge and hammer

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɔːd͡ʒ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /fɔɹd͡ʒ/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /fo(ː)ɹd͡ʒ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /foəd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)dʒ

Etymology 1

From Middle English forge, from Old French forge, early Old French faverge, from Latin fabrica (workshop), from faber (workman in hard materials, smith) (genitive fabri). Cognate with Franco-Provençal favèrge.

Noun

forge (plural forges)

  1. Furnace or hearth where metals are heated prior to hammering them into shape.
  2. Workshop in which metals are shaped by heating and hammering them.
  3. The act of beating or working iron or steel.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English forgen, from Anglo-Norman forger and Old French forgier, from Latin fabrico (to frame, construct, build).

Verb

forge (third-person singular simple present forges, present participle forging, simple past and past participle forged)

  1. (metallurgy) To shape a metal by heating and hammering.
    • On Mars’s armor forged for proof eterne
  2. To form or create with concerted effort.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Geraint and Enid
      [] do forge a life-long trouble for ourselves.
  3. To create a forgery of; to make a counterfeit item of; to copy or imitate unlawfully.
  4. To make falsely; to produce, as that which is untrue or not genuine; to fabricate.
    • 1663, Samuel Butler, Hudibras
      That paltry story is untrue, / And forged to cheat such gulls as you.
Derived terms
  • forgery
Translations

Etymology 3

Make way, move ahead, most likely an alteration of force, but perhaps from forge (n.), via notion of steady hammering at something. Originally nautical, in reference to vessels.

Verb

forge (third-person singular simple present forges, present participle forging, simple past and past participle forged)

  1. (often as forge ahead) To move forward heavily and slowly (originally as a ship); to advance gradually but steadily; to proceed towards a goal in the face of resistance or difficulty.
    The party of explorers forged through the thick underbrush.
    We decided to forge ahead with our plans even though our biggest underwriter backed out.
    • 1849, Thomas De Quincey, Dream-Fugue (published in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine)
      And off she [a ship] forged without a shock.
  2. (sometimes as forge ahead) To advance, move or act with an abrupt increase in speed or energy.
    With seconds left in the race, the runner forged into first place.
Translations

See also

  • fabricate
  • make up
  • blacksmith

Anagrams

  • go-fer, gofer

French

Etymology

From Old French forge, from earlier faverge, inherited from Latin fābrica. Doublet of fabrique, which was borrowed.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔʁʒ/

Noun

forge f (plural forges)

  1. forge (workshop)
  2. forge (furnace)

Descendants

  • Catalan: forja
  • Franco-Provençal: fôrge
  • Galician: forxa
  • Italian: forgia
  • Portuguese: forja
  • Romanian: forjă
  • Spanish: forja

Verb

forge

  1. first-person singular present indicative of forger
  2. third-person singular present indicative of forger
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of forger
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of forger
  5. second-person singular imperative of forger

Further reading

  • “forge” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old French forge, from earlier faverge, from Latin fabrica.

Alternative forms

  • fforge

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɔrdʒ(ə)/, /ˈfɔːrdʒ(ə)/

Noun

forge

  1. forge (workshop)
Descendants
  • English: forge
  • Scots: forge
References
  • “fō̆rǧe, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 2

Verb

forge

  1. Alternative form of forgen

Old French

Etymology

From older faverge, from Latin fābrica.

Noun

forge f (oblique plural forges, nominative singular forge, nominative plural forges)

  1. forge (workshop)

Descendants

  • French: forge
    • Catalan: forja
    • Franco-Provençal: fôrge
    • Galician: forxa
    • Italian: forgia
    • Portuguese: forja
    • Romanian: forjă
    • Spanish: forja
  • Middle English: forge, fforge
    • English: forge
    • Scots: forge


English

Etymology

From Middle English hamer, from Old English hamor, from Proto-West Germanic *hamar, from Proto-Germanic *hamaraz (tool with a stone head) (compare West Frisian hammer, Low German Hamer, Dutch hamer, German Hammer, Danish hammer, Swedish hammare), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱmoros (compare Sanskrit अश्मर (aśmará, stony)), itself a derivation from *h₂éḱmō (stone).

For *h₂éḱmō (stone), compare Lithuanian akmuõ, Latvian akmens, Russian камень (kamenʹ), Serbo-Croatian kamēn, Albanian kmesë (sickle), Ancient Greek ἄκμων (ákmōn, meteor rock, anvil), Avestan ????????????????????(namsa), Sanskrit अश्मन् (áśman)) (root *h₂eḱ- (sharp)).

(declare a defaulter on the stock exchange): Originally signalled by knocking with a wooden mallet.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈhæm.ə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -æmə(ɹ)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈhæm.ɚ/

Noun

hammer (plural hammers)

  1. A tool with a heavy head and a handle used for pounding.
  2. The act of using a hammer to hit something.
  3. A moving part of a firearm that strikes the firing pin to discharge a gun.
  4. (anatomy) The malleus, a small bone of the middle ear.
  5. (music) In a piano or dulcimer, a piece of wood covered in felt that strikes the string.
  6. (sports) A device made of a heavy steel ball attached to a length of wire, and used for throwing.
  7. (curling) The last stone in an end.
  8. (frisbee) A frisbee throwing style in which the disc is held upside-down with a forehand grip and thrown above the head.
  9. Part of a clock that strikes upon a bell to indicate the hour.
  10. One who, or that which, smites or shatters.
    St. Augustine was the hammer of heresies.
    • 1849, John Henry Newman, Discourses to Mixed Congregations
      He met the stern legionaries [of Rome] who had been the massive iron hammers of the whole earth.
  11. (journalism) Short for hammer headline.
    • 1981, Harry W. Stonecipher, ‎Edward C. Nicholls, ‎Douglas A. Anderson, Electronic Age News Editing (page 104)
      Hammers are, in essence, reverse kickers. Instead of being set in smaller type like kickers, hammers are set in larger type than headlines.
  12. (motor racing) The accelerator pedal.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • mallet

Verb

hammer (third-person singular simple present hammers, present participle hammering, simple past and past participle hammered)

  1. To strike repeatedly with a hammer, some other implement, the fist, etc.
  2. To form or forge with a hammer; to shape by beating.
    • hammered money
  3. (figuratively) To emphasize a point repeatedly.
  4. (sports) To hit particularly hard.
  5. (cycling, intransitive, slang) To ride very fast.
    • 2011, Tim Moore, French Revolutions: Cycling the Tour de France (page 58)
      Fifteen minutes later, leaving a vapour trail of kitchen smells, I hammered into Obterre.
  6. (intransitive) To strike internally, as if hit by a hammer.
    I could hear the engine’s valves hammering once the timing rod was thrown.
  7. (transitive, slang, figuratively, sports) To defeat (a person, a team) resoundingly
    We hammered them 5-0!
  8. (transitive, slang, computing) To make high demands on (a system or service).
    • 1995, Optimizing Windows NT (volume 4, page 226)
      So we’ll be hammering the server in an unrealistic manner, but we’ll see how the additional clients affect overall performance. We’ll add two, three, four, and then five clients, []
  9. (transitive, finance) To declare (a person) a defaulter on the stock exchange.
  10. (transitive, finance) To beat down the price of (a stock), or depress (a market).
  11. (transitive, colloquial) To have hard sex with
    Synonym: pound

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • hammer out

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse hamarr, from Proto-Germanic *hamaraz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱmoros, from *h₂éḱmō (stone).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hamər/, [ˈhɑmɐ]

Noun

hammer c (singular definite hammeren, plural indefinite hammere or hamre)

  1. hammer

Inflection


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈhamɐ/
  • Homophone: Hammer

Verb

hammer

  1. (colloquial, regional) Contraction of haben wir.

Usage notes

This contraction is common throughout central Germany, southern Germany, and Austria. It is only occasionally heard in northern Germany.

See also

  • simmer

Middle English

Noun

hammer

  1. Alternative form of hamer

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hamarr, from Proto-Germanic *hamaraz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱmoros, from *h₂éḱmō (stone).

Alternative forms

  • hammar

Noun

hammer m (definite singular hammeren, indefinite plural hammere or hamrer, definite plural hammerne or hamrene)

  1. a hammer (tool)
Related terms
  • hamre (verb)

Etymology 2

Noun

hammer m

  1. indefinite plural of ham

References

  • “hammer” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian hamar, from Proto-Germanic *hamaraz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱmoros, from *h₂éḱmō (stone).

Noun

hammer c (plural hammers, diminutive hammerke)

  1. hammer

Further reading

  • “hammer”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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