forge vs spirt what difference

what is difference between forge and spirt

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɔːd͡ʒ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /fɔɹd͡ʒ/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /fo(ː)ɹd͡ʒ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /foəd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)dʒ

Etymology 1

From Middle English forge, from Old French forge, early Old French faverge, from Latin fabrica (workshop), from faber (workman in hard materials, smith) (genitive fabri). Cognate with Franco-Provençal favèrge.

Noun

forge (plural forges)

  1. Furnace or hearth where metals are heated prior to hammering them into shape.
  2. Workshop in which metals are shaped by heating and hammering them.
  3. The act of beating or working iron or steel.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English forgen, from Anglo-Norman forger and Old French forgier, from Latin fabrico (to frame, construct, build).

Verb

forge (third-person singular simple present forges, present participle forging, simple past and past participle forged)

  1. (metallurgy) To shape a metal by heating and hammering.
    • On Mars’s armor forged for proof eterne
  2. To form or create with concerted effort.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Geraint and Enid
      [] do forge a life-long trouble for ourselves.
  3. To create a forgery of; to make a counterfeit item of; to copy or imitate unlawfully.
  4. To make falsely; to produce, as that which is untrue or not genuine; to fabricate.
    • 1663, Samuel Butler, Hudibras
      That paltry story is untrue, / And forged to cheat such gulls as you.
Derived terms
  • forgery
Translations

Etymology 3

Make way, move ahead, most likely an alteration of force, but perhaps from forge (n.), via notion of steady hammering at something. Originally nautical, in reference to vessels.

Verb

forge (third-person singular simple present forges, present participle forging, simple past and past participle forged)

  1. (often as forge ahead) To move forward heavily and slowly (originally as a ship); to advance gradually but steadily; to proceed towards a goal in the face of resistance or difficulty.
    The party of explorers forged through the thick underbrush.
    We decided to forge ahead with our plans even though our biggest underwriter backed out.
    • 1849, Thomas De Quincey, Dream-Fugue (published in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine)
      And off she [a ship] forged without a shock.
  2. (sometimes as forge ahead) To advance, move or act with an abrupt increase in speed or energy.
    With seconds left in the race, the runner forged into first place.
Translations

See also

  • fabricate
  • make up
  • blacksmith

Anagrams

  • go-fer, gofer

French

Etymology

From Old French forge, from earlier faverge, inherited from Latin fābrica. Doublet of fabrique, which was borrowed.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔʁʒ/

Noun

forge f (plural forges)

  1. forge (workshop)
  2. forge (furnace)

Descendants

  • Catalan: forja
  • Franco-Provençal: fôrge
  • Galician: forxa
  • Italian: forgia
  • Portuguese: forja
  • Romanian: forjă
  • Spanish: forja

Verb

forge

  1. first-person singular present indicative of forger
  2. third-person singular present indicative of forger
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of forger
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of forger
  5. second-person singular imperative of forger

Further reading

  • “forge” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old French forge, from earlier faverge, from Latin fabrica.

Alternative forms

  • fforge

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɔrdʒ(ə)/, /ˈfɔːrdʒ(ə)/

Noun

forge

  1. forge (workshop)
Descendants
  • English: forge
  • Scots: forge
References
  • “fō̆rǧe, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 2

Verb

forge

  1. Alternative form of forgen

Old French

Etymology

From older faverge, from Latin fābrica.

Noun

forge f (oblique plural forges, nominative singular forge, nominative plural forges)

  1. forge (workshop)

Descendants

  • French: forge
    • Catalan: forja
    • Franco-Provençal: fôrge
    • Galician: forxa
    • Italian: forgia
    • Portuguese: forja
    • Romanian: forjă
    • Spanish: forja
  • Middle English: forge, fforge
    • English: forge
    • Scots: forge


English

Verb

spirt (third-person singular simple present spirts, present participle spirting, simple past and past participle spirted)

  1. Archaic spelling of spurt.

Noun

spirt (plural spirts)

  1. Archaic spelling of spurt.

References

“spirt” in The New Oxford American Dictionary, Second Edition, Oxford University Press, 2005

Anagrams

  • Strip, TRIPS, sprit, stirp, strip, trips

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin spiritus.

Noun

spirt m (plural spirts)

  1. spirit

Related terms

  • spirtât
  • spirtôs
  • spirtuâl
  • Spirtussant

Ladin

Etymology

From Latin spiritus.

Noun

spirt m (plural [please provide])

  1. spirit

Related terms

  • spiert

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spiːʈ/
  • Rhymes: -iːʈ

Verb

spirt

  1. past participle of spire

Romanian

Etymology

From Russian спирт (spirt), from English spirit, from Latin spīritus.

Noun

spirt n (uncountable)

  1. alcohol, spirit, particularly rubbing alcohol

Declension

Further reading

  • spirt in DEX online – Dicționare ale limbii române (Dictionaries of the Romanian language)

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