forge vs spurt what difference

what is difference between forge and spurt

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɔːd͡ʒ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /fɔɹd͡ʒ/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /fo(ː)ɹd͡ʒ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /foəd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)dʒ

Etymology 1

From Middle English forge, from Old French forge, early Old French faverge, from Latin fabrica (workshop), from faber (workman in hard materials, smith) (genitive fabri). Cognate with Franco-Provençal favèrge.

Noun

forge (plural forges)

  1. Furnace or hearth where metals are heated prior to hammering them into shape.
  2. Workshop in which metals are shaped by heating and hammering them.
  3. The act of beating or working iron or steel.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English forgen, from Anglo-Norman forger and Old French forgier, from Latin fabrico (to frame, construct, build).

Verb

forge (third-person singular simple present forges, present participle forging, simple past and past participle forged)

  1. (metallurgy) To shape a metal by heating and hammering.
    • On Mars’s armor forged for proof eterne
  2. To form or create with concerted effort.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Geraint and Enid
      [] do forge a life-long trouble for ourselves.
  3. To create a forgery of; to make a counterfeit item of; to copy or imitate unlawfully.
  4. To make falsely; to produce, as that which is untrue or not genuine; to fabricate.
    • 1663, Samuel Butler, Hudibras
      That paltry story is untrue, / And forged to cheat such gulls as you.
Derived terms
  • forgery
Translations

Etymology 3

Make way, move ahead, most likely an alteration of force, but perhaps from forge (n.), via notion of steady hammering at something. Originally nautical, in reference to vessels.

Verb

forge (third-person singular simple present forges, present participle forging, simple past and past participle forged)

  1. (often as forge ahead) To move forward heavily and slowly (originally as a ship); to advance gradually but steadily; to proceed towards a goal in the face of resistance or difficulty.
    The party of explorers forged through the thick underbrush.
    We decided to forge ahead with our plans even though our biggest underwriter backed out.
    • 1849, Thomas De Quincey, Dream-Fugue (published in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine)
      And off she [a ship] forged without a shock.
  2. (sometimes as forge ahead) To advance, move or act with an abrupt increase in speed or energy.
    With seconds left in the race, the runner forged into first place.
Translations

See also

  • fabricate
  • make up
  • blacksmith

Anagrams

  • go-fer, gofer

French

Etymology

From Old French forge, from earlier faverge, inherited from Latin fābrica. Doublet of fabrique, which was borrowed.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔʁʒ/

Noun

forge f (plural forges)

  1. forge (workshop)
  2. forge (furnace)

Descendants

  • Catalan: forja
  • Franco-Provençal: fôrge
  • Galician: forxa
  • Italian: forgia
  • Portuguese: forja
  • Romanian: forjă
  • Spanish: forja

Verb

forge

  1. first-person singular present indicative of forger
  2. third-person singular present indicative of forger
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of forger
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of forger
  5. second-person singular imperative of forger

Further reading

  • “forge” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old French forge, from earlier faverge, from Latin fabrica.

Alternative forms

  • fforge

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɔrdʒ(ə)/, /ˈfɔːrdʒ(ə)/

Noun

forge

  1. forge (workshop)
Descendants
  • English: forge
  • Scots: forge
References
  • “fō̆rǧe, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 2

Verb

forge

  1. Alternative form of forgen

Old French

Etymology

From older faverge, from Latin fābrica.

Noun

forge f (oblique plural forges, nominative singular forge, nominative plural forges)

  1. forge (workshop)

Descendants

  • French: forge
    • Catalan: forja
    • Franco-Provençal: fôrge
    • Galician: forxa
    • Italian: forgia
    • Portuguese: forja
    • Romanian: forjă
    • Spanish: forja
  • Middle English: forge, fforge
    • English: forge
    • Scots: forge


English

Alternative forms

  • spirt

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: spû(r)t, IPA(key): /spɜː(r)t/
  • (General American) enPR: spûrt, IPA(key): /spɝt/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(r)t

Etymology 1

From earlier spirt, sprit (to sprout), from Middle English sprutten, from Old English spryttan, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *(s)per- (to strew, sow, sprinkle).

Verb

spurt (third-person singular simple present spurts, present participle spurting, simple past and past participle spurted)

  1. (transitive) To cause to gush out suddenly or violently in a stream or jet.
  2. (intransitive) To rush from a confined place in a small stream or jet.
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula Chapter 21
      With that he pulled open his shirt, and with his long sharp nails opened a vein in his breast. When the blood began to spurt out, he took my hands in one of his, holding them tight, and with the other seized my neck and pressed my mouth to the wound, so that I must either suffocate or swallow some to the . . . Oh, my God! My God! What have I done?

Synonyms

  • spout

Translations

Noun

spurt (plural spurts)

  1. A brief gush, as of liquid spurting from an orifice or a cut/wound.
    a spurt of water; a spurt of blood
  2. (slang) Ejaculation of semen.
    • 2019, R.W. Clinger, Stockton County Cowboys Box Set, JMS Books LLC (→ISBN)
      Clean all your spurt off me, man.” And so I did.
  3. (obsolete) A shoot; a bud.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)

Translations

Etymology 2

Origin uncertain. May be derived from Etymology 1.

Noun

spurt (plural spurts)

  1. A moment, a short period of time.
  2. A sudden brief burst of, or increase in, speed, effort, activity, emotion or development.
    • 1859, Thomas Hughes, Tom Brown At Oxford
      The long, steady sweep of the so-called “paddle” tried him almost as much as the breathless strain of the spurt.
  3. The act of spurting, or something spurted
    • 2015, Shelley Munro, Alexandre
      He thrust against her and deep inside, she felt his spurt of semen. Her clit jumped in response, and Lily tumbled into an orgasm that shook her clear to her toes.

Derived terms

  • growth spurt

Translations

Verb

spurt (third-person singular simple present spurts, present participle spurting, simple past and past participle spurted)

  1. (intransitive) To make a strong effort for a short period of time.
    The bullion market spurted on Thursday.
    The runners spurted to the last lap as if they had extracted new energy from the applauds of the audience.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Prust, turps

Danish

Etymology

From English spurt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spuːrt/, [sb̥uɐ̯ˀd̥]

Noun

spurt c (singular definite spurten, plural indefinite spurter)

  1. spurt (any sudden but not prolonged action)

Inflection

Related terms

  • slutspurt
  • spurte

Verb

spurt

  1. imperative of spurte

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowing from English spurt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spʏrt/
  • Hyphenation: spurt
  • Rhymes: -ʏrt

Noun

spurt m (plural spurts, diminutive spurtje n)

  1. spurt (short sudden energetic effort), especially in running or cycling

Related terms

  • spurten

Faroese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spʊɻ̊ʈ/

Verb

spurt

  1. supine form of spyrja

Noun

spurt

  1. indefinite accusative singular of spurtur

Icelandic

Verb

spurt

  1. supine of spyrja

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

spurt

  1. past participle of spørre

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

spurt

  1. neuter past participle of spørja and spørje

Swedish

Etymology

From English spurt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɵrt/

Noun

spurt (c)

  1. spurt (any sudden but not prolonged action)

Inflection

Related terms

  • slutspurt
  • spurtsträcka
  • spurta

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