form vs strain what difference

what is difference between form and strain

English

Alternative forms

  • forme (rare or archaic)

Etymology

From Middle English forme (shape, figure, manner, bench, frame, seat, condition, agreement, etc.), borrowed from Old French forme, from Latin fōrma (shape, figure, image, outline, plan, mold, frame, case, etc., manner, sort, kind, etc.)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɔːm/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /fɔɹm/
  • Hyphenation: form
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)m

Noun

form (countable and uncountable, plural forms)

  1. (heading, physical) To do with shape.
    1. The shape or visible structure of a thing or person.
      • 1699, William Temple, Heads designed for an essay on conversations
        Study gives strength to the mind; conversation, grace: the first apt to give stiffness, the other suppleness: one gives substance and form to the statue, the other polishes it.
    2. A thing that gives shape to other things as in a mold.
    3. Regularity, beauty, or elegance.
    4. (philosophy) The inherent nature of an object; that which the mind itself contributes as the condition of knowing; that in which the essence of a thing consists.
    5. Characteristics not involving atomic components. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
    6. (dated) A long bench with no back.
      • 1981, GB Edwards, The Book of Ebenezer Le Page, New York 2007, page 10:
        I can see the old schoolroom yet: the broken-down desks and the worn-out forms with knots in that got stuck into your backside [].
      • 2010, Stephen Fry, The Fry Chronicles: An Autobiography:
        The prefect grabbed me by the shoulders and steered me down a passageway, and down another and finally through a door that led into a long, low dining-room crowded with loudly breakfasting boys sitting on long, shiny oak forms, as benches used to be called.
    7. (fine arts) The boundary line of a material object. In painting, more generally, the human body.
    8. (crystallography) The combination of planes included under a general crystallographic symbol. It is not necessarily a closed solid.
  2. (social) To do with structure or procedure.
    1. An order of doing things, as in religious ritual.
    2. Established method of expression or practice; fixed way of proceeding; conventional or stated scheme; formula.
      • Those whom form of laws / Condemned to die.
    3. Constitution; mode of construction, organization, etc.; system.
    4. Show without substance; empty, outside appearance; vain, trivial, or conventional ceremony; conventionality; formality.
    5. (archaic) A class or rank in society.
      • ladies of a high form
    6. (Britain) A criminal record; loosely, past history (in a given area).
      • 2011, Jane Martinson, The Guardian, 4 May:
        It’s fair to say she has form on this: she has criticised David Cameron’s proposal to create all-women shortlists for prospective MPs, tried to ban women wearing high heels at work as the resulting pain made them take time off work, and tried to reduce the point at which an abortion can take place from 24 to 21 weeks.
    7. Level of performance.
      The team’s form has been poor this year.
      The orchestra was on top form this evening.
    8. (Britain, education) A class or year of school pupils (often preceded by an ordinal number to specify the year, as in sixth form).
      • 1928, George Bickerstaff, The mayor, and other folk
        One other day after afternoon school, Mr. Percival came behind me and put his hand on me. “Let me see, what’s your name? Which form are you in? []
      • 1976, Ronald King, School and college: studies of post-sixteen education
        From the sixth form will come the scholars and the administrators.
  3. A blank document or template to be filled in by the user.
  4. A specimen document to be copied or imitated.
  5. (grammar) A grouping of words which maintain grammatical context in different usages; the particular shape or structure of a word or part of speech.
  6. The den or home of a hare.
    • , I.iii.1.2:
      The Egyptians therefore in their hieroglyphics expressed a melancholy man by a hare sitting in her form, as being a most timorous and solitary creature.
    • 1974, Lawrence Durrell, Monsieur, Faber & Faber 1992, p.275:
      Hares left their snug ‘forms’ in the cold grass.
  7. (computing, programming) A window or dialogue box.
    • 1998, Gary Cornell, Visual Basic 6 from the ground up (p.426)
      While it is quite amazing how much one can do with Visual Basic with the code attached to a single form, to take full advantage of VB you’ll need to start using multiple forms and having the code on all the forms in your project interact.
    • 2010, Neil Smyth, C# Essentials
      Throughout this chapter we will work with a form in a new project.
  8. (taxonomy) An infraspecific rank.
  9. (printing, dated) The type or other matter from which an impression is to be taken, arranged and secured in a chase.
  10. (geometry) A quantic.
  11. (sports, fitness) A specific way of performing a movement.

Synonyms

  • (visible structure of a thing or person): shape; see also Thesaurus:shape
    • (visible structure of a person): figure; see also Thesaurus:physique
  • (thing that gives shape to other things): cast, cookie cutter, mold, pattern
  • (mode of construction): configuration, makeup; see also Thesaurus:composition
  • (blank document): formular
  • (pre-collegiate level): grade
  • (biology): f.

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Norwegian Bokmål: form

Translations

Verb

form (third-person singular simple present forms, present participle forming, simple past and past participle formed)

  1. (transitive) To assume (a certain shape or visible structure).
  2. (transitive) To give (a shape or visible structure) to a thing or person.
  3. (intransitive) To take shape.
  4. To put together or bring into being; assemble.
  5. (transitive, linguistics) To create (a word) by inflection or derivation.
  6. (transitive) To constitute, to compose, to make up.
    • 1948 May, Stanley Pashko, “The Biggest Family”, in Boys’ Life, Volume 38, Number 5, Boy Scouts of America, ISSN 0006-8608, p.10:
      Insects form the biggest family group in nature’s kingdom, and also the oldest.
  7. To mould or model by instruction or discipline.
    • 1731–1735, Alexander Pope, Moral Essays
      ‘Tis education forms the common mind.
    • Thus formed for speed, he challenges the wind.
  8. To provide (a hare) with a form.
    • The melancholy hare is formed in brakes and briers.
  9. (electrical, historical, transitive) To treat (plates) to prepare them for introduction into a storage battery, causing one plate to be composed more or less of spongy lead, and the other of lead peroxide. This was formerly done by repeated slow alternations of the charging current, but later the plates or grids were coated or filled, one with a paste of red lead and the other with litharge, introduced into the cell, and formed by a direct charging current.

Synonyms

  • (give shape): beshape, transmogrify; see also Thesaurus:form
  • (take shape): take form, take shape; see also Thesaurus:come into being
  • (constitute): compose, make up; see also Thesaurus:compose

Related terms

  • format
  • formation

Translations

Further reading

  • form in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • form in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • MoRF, from

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin fōrma (shape, form).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔrm/, [fɒːˀm]

Noun

form c (singular definite formen, plural indefinite former)

  1. form
  2. shape

Declension

Noun

form c (singular definite formen, plural indefinite forme)

  1. mould
  2. tin (a metal pan used for baking, roasting, etc.)

Declension

Further reading

  • “form” in Den Danske Ordbog
  • form on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

German

Verb

form

  1. singular imperative of formen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of formen

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔrm/
  • Rhymes: -ɔrm
  • Hyphenation: form

Etymology 1

From Old Norse form, from Latin fōrma (form; figure, shape), perhaps from Etruscan *morma (*morma), from Ancient Greek μορφή (morphḗ, shape, form), possibly of Pre-Greek origin.

Noun

form f or m (definite singular forma or formen, indefinite plural former, definite plural formene)

  1. a form, shape (the outer space of a thing; figure, outline)
    1. (in the plural) curves (the shape of a human, but especially a woman’s body)
    2. a shape, form (way in which details, especially outer lines, are prepared, arranged, assembled into a harmonious whole)
    3. form (way of expressing oneself; way of acting)
      Synonym: innhold
    4. a form, design (the way in which something acts, is organized or manifests itself)
    5. (physics, sciences) a state (the physical property of matter as solid, liquid, gas or plasma)
      Synonym: aggregattilstand
    6. (biology) a level below species in the classification of organisms, where there is a less systematic variation between individuals of the same species
  2. a type, kind, form (a category; a group of entities that have common characteristics such that they may be grouped together)
  3. (philosophy) a form (an eternal type of thing or idea, especially in Plato’s philosophy)
  4. (philosophy, natural science) the formal cause (the design, pattern, or pure concept of a thing, which gives form or structure to its matter, in Aristotelianism)
  5. (philosophy) form (summary of the manifold, the material of experience, into unity in consciousness – especially in Kant’s philosophy)
  6. a norm (a rule that is imposed by regulations and/or socially enforced by members of a community)
    1. (in the plural) etiquette (the customary behavior of members of a profession, business, law, or sports team towards each other)
    Synonym: etikette
  7. (linguistics, grammar) a form (a grouping of words which maintain grammatical context in different usages; the particular shape or structure of a word or part of speech)
  8. a form, mold (a hollow form or matrix for shaping a fluid or plastic substance)
    1. (typography) a printing form (an object, usually in the shape of a block or a plate, used in printing to apply ink on the printed surface)
      Synonym: trykkform
    2. (technology) an extruder (a machine that extrudes material through shaped dies)
      Synonym: ekstruder

Derived terms

Etymology 2

From English form, from Middle English forme (shape, figure, manner, bench, frame, seat, condition, agreement), from Old French forme, from Latin fōrma (form; figure, shape), perhaps from Etruscan *morma (*morma), from Ancient Greek μορφή (morphḗ, shape, form), possibly of Pre-Greek origin.

Noun

form f or m (definite singular forma or formen, indefinite plural former, definite plural formene)

  1. (physical) shape, form (a human or animal’s physical condition, especially in terms of endurance and athletic performance)
    Synonyms: kondisjon, frisk, sunn
Related terms
  • forme (to form)

Etymology 3

Verb

form

  1. imperative of forme

References

  • “form” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “form” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).
  • “form (algebra)”, “form (filosofi)”, “form (idrett)”, “form (jus)”, “form (kunst)”, “form (språkvitenskap)”, “form (teknikk)”, “form (musikk)”, “form (matematisk analyse)” in Store norske leksikon

Anagrams

  • from, morf

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin forma.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔrm/

Noun

form f (definite singular forma, indefinite plural former, definite plural formene)

  1. form
  2. shape
  3. a mould (e.g. for cast products)

Derived terms

Related terms

  • -forma
  • forme

References

  • “form” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish forma, borrowed from Latin forma.

Pronunciation

Noun

form c

  1. a form, a shape
  2. a form, a mold, a dish, a tray, a tin, a piece of ovenware

Declension

Related terms

shape
  • cirkelform
  • ellipsform
  • forma
mold
  • formfranska
  • formgjuta
  • gjutform
  • kakform
  • knäckform
  • pajform

Anagrams

  • fr.o.m., from

Turkish

Etymology

From French forme.

Noun

form (definite accusative formu, plural formlar)

  1. form

Declension


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɹeɪ̯n/
  • Rhymes: -eɪn

Etymology 1

From Middle English streen, strene, streon, istreon (race, stock, generation), from Old English strēon, ġestrēon (gain, wealth), from Proto-Germanic *streuną (heap, treasure, profit, gain), from Proto-Indo-European *strew- (to spread, strew) (cognate with Old Saxon gistriuni, Old High German gistriuni (gain, property, wealth, business), Latin strues (heap)). Confused in Middle English with the related noun strend, strynd, strund, from Old English strȳnd (race; stock), from strēonan, strȳnan (to beget; acquire). Related also to Dutch struinen (to prowl, root about, rout).

Noun

strain (plural strains)

  1. (archaic) Race; lineage, pedigree.
  2. (biology) A particular variety of a microbe, virus, or other organism, usually a taxonomically infraspecific one.
  3. (figuratively) Hereditary character, quality, tendency, or disposition.
    Synonyms: propensity, proneness
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, The Advantages of Religion to Societies
      Intemperance and lust breed diseases, which being propogated, spoil the strain of a nation.
  4. (music, poetry) Any sustained note or movement; a song; a distinct portion of an ode or other poem; also, the pervading note, or burden, of a song, poem, etc.
    Synonyms: theme, motive, manner, style
  5. Language that is eloquent, poetic, or otherwise heightened.
    (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought:)
  6. (rare) A kind or sort (of person etc.).
  7. (obsolete) Treasure.
  8. (obsolete) The blood-vessel in the yolk of an egg.
Translations
Related terms
  • strew

Etymology 2

From Middle English straynen, streinen, streynen, from Old French estreindre (whence French étreindre (to grip)), from Latin stringere (to draw tight together, to tie).

Verb

strain (third-person singular simple present strains, present participle straining, simple past and past participle strained)

  1. (obsolete) To hold tightly, to clasp.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.ii:
      So hauing said, her twixt her armes twaine / She straightly straynd, and colled tenderly []
    • Evander with a close embrace / Strained his departing friend.
    • 1859, Ferna Vale, Natalie; or, A Gem Among the Sea-Weeds
      “Farewell!”—the mother strained her child to her heart again, and again put her from her, to embrace her more closely.
  2. To apply a force or forces to by stretching out.
  3. To damage by drawing, stretching, or the exertion of force.
  4. To act upon, in any way, so as to cause change of form or volume, as when bending a beam.
  5. To exert or struggle (to do something), especially to stretch (one’s senses, faculties etc.) beyond what is normal or comfortable.
    • They strain their warbling throats / To welcome in the spring.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      Thus my plight was evil indeed, for I had nothing now to burn to give me light, and knew that ’twas no use setting to grout till I could see to go about it. Moreover, the darkness was of that black kind that is never found beneath the open sky, no, not even on the darkest night, but lurks in close and covered places and strains the eyes in trying to see into it.
  6. To stretch beyond its proper limit; to do violence to, in terms of intent or meaning.
    • 1724, Jonathan Swift, Drapier’s Letters, 4
      There can be no other meaning in this expression, however some may pretend to strain it.
  7. (transitive) To separate solid from liquid by passing through a strainer or colander
  8. (intransitive) To percolate; to be filtered.
  9. To make uneasy or unnatural; to produce with apparent effort; to force; to constrain.
  10. To urge with importunity; to press.
  11. (transitive) hug somebody; to hold somebody tightly.
Derived terms
  • strainer
  • strain every nerve
Translations

Noun

strain (countable and uncountable, plural strains)

  1. The act of straining, or the state of being strained.
    • 1832, Charles Stewart Drewry (A.M.I.C.E.), A memoir on suspension bridges, page 183:
      If the Menai Bridge, for instance, were loaded at that rate, the entire strain on the main chains would be about 2000 tons ; while the chains containing 260 square inches of iron would bear, at 9 tons per square inch, 2340 tons, without stretching  …
    • 2004, Sanjay Shrivastava, Medical Device Materials: Proceedings from the Materials & Processes for Medical Devices Conference 2003, 8-10 September 2003, Anaheim, California, ASM International (→ISBN), page 176:
      Therefore, the goal of this study is to assess the influence of strain on the corrosion resistance of passivated Nitinol and stainless steel implant materials. Materials and Methods Nitinol (50.8%at. Ni) wire (NDC, Fremont, CA) and 316L stainless …
  2. A violent effort; an excessive and hurtful exertion or tension, as of the muscles.
  3. An injury resulting from violent effort; a sprain.
  4. (uncountable, engineering) A dimensionless measure of object deformation either referring to engineering strain or true strain.
  5. (obsolete) The track of a deer.
    • 1624, John Smith, Generall Historie, in Kupperman 1988, p. 145:
      When they have shot a Deere by land, they follow him like bloud-hounds by the bloud, and straine, and oftentimes so take them.
Derived terms
  • breaking strain

Translations

Related terms

  • stress
  • strict
  • stringent

Etymology 3

From Middle English strenen (to beget, father, procreate), from Old English strēonan, strīenan, strȳnan (to beget, generate, gain, acquire), from Proto-Germanic *striunijaną (to furnish, decorate, acquire).

Verb

strain (third-person singular simple present strains, present participle straining, simple past and past participle strained)

  1. (obsolete) To beget, generate (of light), engender, copulate (both of animals and humans), lie with, be born, come into the world.

Anagrams

  • Sartin, Tarins, Trains, atrins, instar, santir, sartin, starin’, tairns, tarins, trains

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