formation vs shaping what difference

what is difference between formation and shaping

English

Etymology

From Middle English formacioun, formation, borrowed from Old French formacion, from Latin fōrmātiō, from fōrmō (form, verb); see form as verb.
Morphologically form +‎ -ation

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən
  • (US) IPA(key): /fɔɹ.ˈmeɪ.ʃən/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /fə(ɹ).ˈmeɪ.ʃən/
  • Hyphenation: for‧ma‧tion

Noun

formation (countable and uncountable, plural formations)

  1. The act of assembling a group or structure. [from 14th c.]
    • 2019, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      Some cloud formation was confirmed and rainfall was observed over some islands.

  2. Something possessing structure or form. [from 17th c.]
  3. The process during which something comes into being and gains its characteristics. [from 18th c.]
  4. (military) A grouping of military units or smaller formations under a command, such as a brigade, division, wing, etc. [from 18th c.]
  5. (geology) A layer of rock of common origin. [from 19th c.]
  6. (military) An arrangement of moving troops, ships, or aircraft, such as a wedge, line abreast, or echelon. Often “in formation”.
  7. (sports) An arrangement of players designed to facilitate certain plays.
  8. The process of influencing or guiding a person to a deeper understanding of a particular vocation.
  9. (category theory) A structure made of two categories, two functors from the first to the second category, and a transformation from one of the functors to the other.

Related terms

  • form

Translations

Further reading

  • “formāciǒun, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  • James A. H. Murray [et al.], editors (1884–1928), “Formation”, in A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles (Oxford English Dictionary), volume IV (F–G), London: Clarendon Press, OCLC 15566697, page 464, column 1.
  • formation in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • formation in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Etymology

From Old French formacion, borrowed from Latin fōrmātiō, fōrmātiōnem. Cf. also the archaic formaison.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔʁ.ma.sjɔ̃/

Noun

formation f (plural formations)

  1. formation, forming, development
  2. education; training
  3. (military) formation

Derived terms

  • autoformation

Related terms

  • forme

Further reading

  • “formation” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Swedish

Etymology

From Latin formatio.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔrmaˈɧuːn/

Noun

formation c

  1. formation

Declension

References

  • formation in Svensk ordbok (SO)


English

Etymology

From Middle English shapynge, equivalent to shape +‎ -ing.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -eɪpɪŋ

Noun

shaping (plural shapings)

  1. The action of the verb to shape.
  2. (psychology) A method of positive reinforcement of behaviour patterns in operant conditioning.

Translations

Verb

shaping

  1. present participle of shape

Anagrams

  • hasping, pashing, phasing

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