forthright vs frank what difference

what is difference between forthright and frank

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English forþright, forþriʒt, forþriht, from Old English forþriht (direct, plain); equivalent to forth +‎ right.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɔːθˌɹaɪt/

Adjective

forthright (comparative more forthright, superlative most forthright)

  1. Straightforward; not evasive; candid and direct.
  2. Frank, outspoken.
  3. Markedly simple.
  4. Fixed; settled; decided.
  5. (archaic) Proceeding straight forth.

Derived terms

  • forthrightly
  • forthrightness
  • unforthright

Translations

Noun

forthright (plural forthrights)

  1. (archaic) A straight path.
    • c. 1610-11, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act III scene iii[1]:
      Gonzalo: [] Here’s a maze trod indeed / Through forth-rights and meanders !

Etymology 2

From Middle English forthright, forþriʒt, forthricte, from Old English forþrihte (straightway, at once, plainly), from forþriht +‎ -e (adverbial suffix).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɔːθˈɹaɪt/

Adverb

forthright (comparative more forthright, superlative most forthright)

  1. Expressly, frankly, unhesitatingly.
  2. At once, forthwith.
  3. Swiftly.
  4. (archaic) Straight forward, in a straight direction.

References

  • “forthright”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “forthright”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɹæŋk/
  • Rhymes: -æŋk
  • Homophones: franc, Frank

Etymology 1

From Middle English frank, from Old French franc (free), in turn from the name of an early Germanic confederation, the Franks, from Proto-West Germanic *frank (courageous, free) and/or Proto-West Germanic *frankō (javelin, spear).

Adjective

frank (comparative franker, superlative frankest)

  1. honest, especially in a manner that seems slightly blunt; candid; not reserved or disguised.
  2. (medicine) unmistakable, clinically obvious, self-evident
  3. (obsolete) Unbounded by restrictions, limitations, etc.; free.
    • It is of frank gift.
  4. (obsolete) Liberal; generous; profuse.
  5. (obsolete, derogatory) Unrestrained; loose; licentious.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)

Derived terms

  • frankly
Translations

Noun

frank (plural franks)

  1. (uncountable) Free postage, a right exercised by governments (usually with definite article).
    • October 5, 1780, William Cowper, letter to Rev. William Unwin
      I have said so much, that, if I had not a frank, I must burn my letter and begin again.
  2. (countable) The notice on an envelope where a stamp would normally be found.

Verb

frank (third-person singular simple present franks, present participle franking, simple past and past participle franked)

  1. To place a frank on an envelope.
  2. To exempt from charge for postage, as a letter, package, or packet, etc.
  3. To send by public conveyance free of expense.
    • 1850-1859, Charles Dickens, Household Words
      This required extensive correspondence; so, in the next place, the privilege of franking letters in reference to the emigrants’ registration office, was obtained—much to the indignation of red tapists.

Translations

See also

  • prepay

Etymology 2

Shortened form of frankfurter.

Noun

frank (plural franks)

  1. A hot dog or sausage.
    Synonyms: frankfurt, frankfurter
Related terms
  • cocktail frank
See also
  • sav
  • savaloy

Etymology 3

Noun

frank (plural franks)

  1. (Britain) The grey heron.

Etymology 4

From Old French franc.

Noun

frank (plural franks)

  1. A pigsty.

Verb

frank (third-person singular simple present franks, present participle franking, simple past and past participle franked)

  1. To shut up in a frank or sty; to pen up; hence, to cram; to fatten.

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfraŋk]
  • Rhymes: -aŋk

Noun

frank m

  1. franc (former currency of France and some other countries)
  2. franc (any of several units of currency such as Swiss franc)

Further reading

  • frank in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • frank in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dutch

Alternative forms

  • vrank (archaic, except in the expression vrank en vrij)

Etymology

From Middle Dutch vranc.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /frɑŋk/
  • Hyphenation: frank
  • Rhymes: -ɑŋk
  • Homophone: Frank

Adjective

frank (comparative franker, superlative frankst)

  1. frank, candid, blunt, open-hearted
  2. (dated) cheeky, brazen

Inflection

Derived terms

  • frank en vrij

Estonian

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

frank (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. franc

Declension

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


German

Etymology

From Middle High German franc, from Old French franc (free), of Germanic but eventually uncertain origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʁaŋk/

Adjective

frank (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) frank

Usage notes

  • Now almost exclusively used in the (also somewhat dated) expression frank und frei.

Declension

Further reading

  • “frank” in Duden online

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /frank/

Noun

frank m anim

  1. franc

Usage notes

Unqualified modern usage typically refers to the Swiss franc.

Declension


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