fortification vs munition what difference

what is difference between fortification and munition

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French fortification, from Late Latin fortificatio, fortificationem, from fortifico, from Latin fortis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌfɔː(ɹ)tɪfɪˈkeɪʃən/, /ˌfɔː(ɹ)tɪfəˈkeɪʃən/
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

fortification (countable and uncountable, plural fortifications)

  1. The act of fortifying; the art or science of fortifying places to strengthen defence against an enemy.
  2. That which fortifies; especially, a work or works erected to defend a place against attack; a fortified place; a fortress; a fort; a castle.
  3. An increase in effectiveness, as by adding ingredients.
    • 1979, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance (volume 33, number 7, July 1979, page 47)
      Compare the nutrition information label of a regular ready-to-eat fortified cereal with that of a presweetened brand and you’ll note that, although the sweetened one’s sugar content is higher, the fortification is virtually identical.
  4. A jagged pattern sometimes seen during an attack of migraine.

Derived terms

  • biofortification

Related terms

  • fortify

Translations


French

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin fortificatio, fortificationem, from fortifico, from Latin fortis.

Pronunciation

Noun

fortification f (plural fortifications)

  1. fortification (all meanings)

Related terms

  • fortifier

Further reading

  • “fortification” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Etymology

From Latin mūnitiō (a defence, fortification) via French munition.

Noun

munition (plural munitions)

  1. (chiefly in the plural) Materials of war: armaments, weapons and ammunition.
    • 1918, Upton Sinclair, The Profits of Religion: An Essay in Economic Interpretation Book 7.:
      Just as we can say that an English girl who leaves the narrow circle of her old life, and goes into a munition factory and joins a union and takes part in its debates, will never after be a docile home-slave; so we can say that the clergyman who helps in Y. M. C. A. work in France, or in Red Cross organization in America, will be less the bigot and formalist forever after.
  2. (chiefly in the plural, military, NATO) Bombs, rockets, missiles (complete explosive devices, in contrast to e.g. guns).
  3. (rare, obsolete) A tower or fortification.
    • 1610, Douay-Rheims Bible, Habacuc 2:1
      I wil stand vpon my watch, and fixe my steppe vpon the munition: and I wil behold, to see what may be sayd to me, and what I may answer to him that rebuketh me.

Derived terms

  • munitionette
  • munitioner
  • submunition

Translations

Verb

munition (third-person singular simple present munitions, present participle munitioning, simple past and past participle munitioned)

  1. (transitive) To supply with munitions.

Derived terms

  • remunition

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin mūnitiō, from mūniō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /my.ni.sjɔ̃/

Noun

munition f (plural munitions)

  1. ammunition (weaponry)

Derived terms

Usage notes

Generally used in the plural.

Descendants

  • English: munition

Further reading

  • “munition” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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