fortify vs lace what difference

what is difference between fortify and lace

English

Etymology

From Middle English fortifien, from Old French fortifier, from Latin fortificō.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɔɹtɪfaɪ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɔːtɪfaɪ/
  • Hyphenation: for‧ti‧fy

Verb

fortify (third-person singular simple present fortifies, present participle fortifying, simple past and past participle fortified)

  1. (military) To increase the defenses of; to strengthen and secure by military works; to render defensible against an attack by hostile forces. [from early 15th c.]
  2. (figuratively) To impart strength or vigor to.
  3. (wine) To add spirits to wine to increase the alcohol content. [from 1880]
  4. (food) To increase the nutritional value of food by adding ingredients. [from 1939]
    • 1979, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance (volume 33, number 7, July 1979, page 47)
      Compare the nutrition information label of a regular ready-to-eat fortified cereal with that of a presweetened brand and you’ll note that, although the sweetened one’s sugar content is higher, the fortification is virtually identical.

Synonyms

  • (To strengthen military defenses): castellate, incastle, incastellate; see also strengthen and secure
  • (To impart strength): See also Thesaurus:strengthen

Derived terms

  • biofortify

Related terms

  • fort
  • fortification
  • fortress

Translations



English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /leɪs/
  • Rhymes: -eɪs

Etymology 1

From Middle English lace, laace, las, from Old French las, from Vulgar Latin *laceum, based on Latin laqueus. Doublet of lasso.

Noun

lace (countable and uncountable, plural laces)

  1. (uncountable) A light fabric containing patterns of holes, usually built up from a single thread. Wp
    • c. 1620, Francis Bacon, letter of advice to Sir George Villiers
      Our English dames are much given to the wearing of very fine and costly laces.
    • Mind you, clothes were clothes in those days. […]  Frills, ruffles, flounces, lace, complicated seams and gores: not only did they sweep the ground and have to be held up in one hand elegantly as you walked along, but they had little capes or coats or feather boas.
  2. (countable) A cord or ribbon passed through eyelets in a shoe or garment, pulled tight and tied to fasten the shoe or garment firmly. Wp
  3. A snare or gin, especially one made of interwoven cords; a net.
    • Vulcanus had caught thee [Venus] in his las.
  4. (slang, obsolete) Spirits added to coffee or another beverage.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Addison to this entry?)
Synonyms
  • (cord):
    • (for a shoe): shoelace
    • (for a garment): tie
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English lacen, lasen, from Old French lacer, lacier, lasser, lachier, from the noun (see above).

Verb

lace (third-person singular simple present laces, present participle lacing, simple past and past participle laced)

  1. (ergative) To fasten (something) with laces.
    • When Jenny’s stays are newly laced.
  2. (transitive) To add alcohol, poison, a drug or anything else potentially harmful to (food or drink).
  3. (transitive) To interweave items.
    • The Gond [] picked up a trail of the Karela, the vine that bears the bitter wild gourd, and laced it to and fro across the temple door.
  4. (transitive) To interweave the spokes of a bicycle wheel.
  5. (transitive) To beat; to lash; to make stripes on.
  6. (transitive) To adorn with narrow strips or braids of some decorative material.
Translations
Derived terms

Anagrams

  • ALEC, Acle, Alec, Cela, acle, alec, cale

Esperanto

Adverb

lace

  1. wearily

Related terms

  • laca

French

Verb

lace

  1. first-person singular present indicative of lacer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of lacer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of lacer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of lacer
  5. second-person singular imperative of lacer

Anagrams

  • cale, calé
  • cela

Latin

Verb

lace

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of laciō

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈla.t͡sɛ/

Noun

lace f

  1. dative/locative singular of laka

Portuguese

Verb

lace

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of laçar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of laçar
  3. first-person singular imperative of laçar
  4. third-person singular imperative of laçar

Spanish

Verb

lace

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of lazar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of lazar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of lazar.

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