foster vs nurture what difference

what is difference between foster and nurture

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɒstə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɔstɚ/
  • (Canada, cotcaught merger) IPA(key): /ˈfɑstɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒstə(ɹ)

Etymology 1

From Middle English foster, from Old English fōstor (food, sustenance), from Proto-Germanic *fōstrą (nourishment, food). Cognate with Middle Dutch voester (nursemaid), Middle Low German vôster (food), Old Norse fóstr (nurturing, education, alimony, child support), Danish foster (fetus), Swedish foster (fetus).

Adjective

foster (not comparable)

  1. Providing parental care to children not related to oneself.
    foster parents
  2. Receiving such care.
    a foster child
  3. Related by such care.
    We are a foster family.
Translations

Noun

foster (countable and uncountable, plural fosters)

  1. (countable, informal) A foster parent.
    Some fosters end up adopting.
  2. (uncountable) The care given to another; guardianship.

Verb

foster (third-person singular simple present fosters, present participle fostering, simple past and past participle fostered)

  1. (transitive) To nurture or bring up offspring, or to provide similar parental care to an unrelated child.
  2. (transitive) To cultivate and grow something.
  3. (transitive) To nurse or cherish something.
  4. (intransitive, obsolete) To be nurtured or trained up together.
Antonyms
  • (cultivate and grow): hinder
Derived terms
Usage notes

Modern English makes a distinction between fostering (which is implied to be temporary or informal) and adopting (which is permanent and makes the child legally recognized as part of the family). In older usage the two terms were more interchangeable.

Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

foster (plural fosters)

  1. (obsolete) A forester.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)

Anagrams

  • Forest, Forets, Fortes, fetors, forest, forset, fortes, fortés, froste, softer

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse fóstr (rear, raise)

Noun

foster n (singular definite fostret or fosteret, plural indefinite fostre)

  1. fetus

Inflection


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse fóstr

Noun

foster n (definite singular fosteret or fostret, indefinite plural foster or fostre, definite plural fostra or fostrene)

  1. (biology) a fetus or foetus

Derived terms

  • fostervann

Related terms

  • embryo

References

  • “foster” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse fóstr

Noun

foster n (definite singular fosteret, indefinite plural foster, definite plural fostera)

  1. (biology) a fetus or foetus

Related terms

  • embryo

References

  • “foster” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Alternative forms

  • fēster, fōstor, fōstur

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *fōstrą, from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂- (to protect).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfoːs.ter/

Noun

fōster n

  1. fostering, nourishing, rearing, feeding
  2. food, nourishment, provisions

Declension

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Middle English: foster
    • English: foster

References

  • Joseph Bosworth and T. Northcote Toller (1898), “fōster”, in An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse fóstr (rear, raise)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʊstɛr/

Noun

foster n

  1. fetus

Declension

Related terms

  • fosterbror
  • fosterfördrivning
  • fosterhem
  • fostersyster
  • fostra


English

Alternative forms

  • nouriture (obsolete)
  • nutriture (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English norture, noriture, from Old French norriture, norreture, from Late Latin nutritura (nourishment), from Latin nutrire (to nourish).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈnɜːɹ.tʃəɹ/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)tʃə(ɹ)

Noun

nurture (countable and uncountable, plural nurtures)

  1. The act of nourishing or nursing; tender care
    Synonyms: upbringing, raising, education, training
  2. That which nourishes; food; diet.
  3. The environmental influences that contribute to the development of an individual (as opposed to “nature”).

Translations

Verb

nurture (third-person singular simple present nurtures, present participle nurturing, simple past and past participle nurtured)

  1. To nourish or nurse.
  2. (figuratively, by extension) To encourage, especially the growth or development of something.
    • 2009, UNESCO, The United Nations World Water Development Report – N° 3 – 2009 – Freshwater and International Law (the Interplay between Universal, Regional and Basin Perspectives), page 10, →ISBN
      The relationships between universal norms and specific norms nurture the development of international law.

Synonyms

  • (figuratively, to encourage): See Thesaurus:nurture

Related terms

  • nourish
  • nourishment
  • nurse
  • nursery
  • nurturance
  • nutrient
  • nutriment
  • nutrition
  • nutritional
  • nutritious
  • nutritive

Translations

Further reading

  • nurture in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • nurture in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • U-turner, untruer

Middle English

Noun

nurture

  1. Alternative form of norture

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial