found vs plant what difference

what is difference between found and plant

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: found, IPA(key): /faʊnd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊnd

Etymology 1

See find.

Verb

found

  1. simple past tense and past participle of find
Synonyms
  • (past participle): discovered; repertitious (by chance or upon advice, obs.)
Derived terms
  • found art
  • found footage
  • found literature
  • found music
  • found object
  • found poetry
  • lost and found
  • unfound

Noun

found (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Food and lodging; board.

Etymology 2

From Middle English founden, from Old French founder (Modern French: fonder), from Latin fundāre. Compare fund.

Verb

found (third-person singular simple present founds, present participle founding, simple past and past participle founded) (transitive)

  1. (transitive) To start (an institution or organization).
  2. (transitive) To begin building. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
Conjugation
Synonyms
  • (to start organization): establish
Antonyms
  • (to begin building): ruin
  • (to start organization): dissolve, abolish
Related terms
  • foundation
  • founder
Translations

References

  • Oxford Online Dictionary, found
  • WordNet 3.1: A Lexical Database for English, Princeton University

Etymology 3

From Middle English founden, from Old French fondre, from Latin fundere. Cognate with Spanish fundir and hundir.

Verb

found (third-person singular simple present founds, present participle founding, simple past and past participle founded) (transitive)

  1. To melt, especially of metal in an industrial setting.
  2. To form by melting a metal and pouring it into a mould; to cast.
Related terms
  • foundry
Translations

Etymology 4

Noun

found (plural founds)

  1. A thin, single-cut file for comb-makers.

Anagrams

  • fondu


English

Etymology

From Middle English plante, from Old English plante (young tree or shrub, herb newly planted), from Latin planta (sprout, shoot, cutting). Broader sense of “any vegetable life, vegetation generally” is from Old French plante. Doublet of clan, borrowed through Celtic languages.

The verb is from Middle English planten, from Old English plantian (to plant), from Latin plantāre, later influenced by Old French planter. Compare also Dutch planten (to plant), German pflanzen (to plant), Swedish plantera (to plant), Icelandic planta (to plant).

Pronunciation

  • (General New Zealand, Received Pronunciation) enPR: plänt, IPA(key): /plɑːnt/, [pʰl̥ɑːnt]
  • (General Australian, US, Canada, Northern England) enPR: plănt, IPA(key): /plænt/, [pʰl̥ænt]
  • (æ-tensing) IPA(key): [pʰl̥eənt]
  • Hyphenation: plant
  • Rhymes: -ɑːnt, -ænt
  • Rhymes: -ænt

Noun

plant (plural plants)

  1. (botany) An organism that is not an animal, especially an organism capable of photosynthesis. Typically a small or herbaceous organism of this kind, rather than a tree.
  2. (botany) An organism of the kingdom Plantae; now specifically, a living organism of the Embryophyta (land plants) or of the Chlorophyta (green algae), a eukaryote that includes double-membraned chloroplasts in its cells containing chlorophyll a and b, or any organism closely related to such an organism.
  3. (ecology) Now specifically, a multicellular eukaryote that includes chloroplasts in its cells, which have a cell wall.
  4. (proscribed as biologically inaccurate) Any creature that grows on soil or similar surfaces, including plants and fungi.
  5. A factory or other industrial or institutional building or facility.
  6. An object placed surreptitiously in order to cause suspicion to fall upon a person.
  7. Anyone assigned to behave as a member of the public during a covert operation (as in a police investigation).
  8. A person, placed amongst an audience, whose role is to cause confusion, laughter etc.
  9. (snooker) A play in which the cue ball knocks one (usually red) ball onto another, in order to pot the second; a set.
    • 2008, Phil Yates, The Times, April 28 2008:
      O’Sullivan risked a plant that went badly astray, splitting the reds.
  10. (uncountable) Machinery, such as the kind used in earthmoving or construction.
  11. (obsolete) A young tree; a sapling; hence, a stick or staff.
  12. (obsolete) The sole of the foot.
  13. (dated, slang) A plan; a swindle; a trick.
  14. An oyster which has been bedded, in distinction from one of natural growth.
  15. (US, dialect) A young oyster suitable for transplanting.

Usage notes

The scientific definition of what organisms should be considered plants changed dramatically during the 20th century. Bacteria, algae, and fungi are no longer considered plants by those who study them. Many textbooks do not reflect the most current thinking on classification.

Hypernyms

  • (biology): Archaeplastida

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

  • plant pot
  • plant room

Translations

See plant/translations § Noun.

Verb

plant (third-person singular simple present plants, present participle planting, simple past and past participle planted)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To place (a seed or plant) in soil or other substrate in order that it may live and grow.
  2. (transitive) To place (an object, or sometimes a person), often with the implication of intending deceit.
    That gun’s not mine! It was planted there by the real murderer!
  3. (transitive) To place or set something firmly or with conviction.
    Plant your feet firmly and give the rope a good tug.
    to plant cannon against a fort; to plant a flag; to plant one’s feet on solid ground
  4. To place in the ground.
  5. To furnish or supply with plants.
    to plant a garden, an orchard, or a forest
  6. To engender; to generate; to set the germ of.
  7. To furnish with a fixed and organized population; to settle; to establish.
    to plant a colony
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Plantations
      planting of countries like planting of woods
  8. To introduce and establish the principles or seeds of.
    to plant Christianity among the heathen
  9. To set up; to install; to instate.

Derived terms

  • faceplant, handplant
  • plant out

Related terms

  • plantation

Translations

See plant/translations § Verb.

See also

  • plant on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Danish

Verb

plant

  1. imperative of plante

Dutch

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch plante, from Latin planta. Doublet of clan.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /plɑnt/
  • Hyphenation: plant
  • Rhymes: -ɑnt

Noun

plant f (plural planten, diminutive plantje n)

  1. plant, any member of the kingdom Plantae
  2. (potentially offensive) cabbage, vegetable (person with severe brain damage)
Hyponyms
  • boom
  • gewas
  • gras
  • heester
  • struik
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Negerhollands: plan, plant

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /plɑnt/
  • Hyphenation: plant

Verb

plant

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of planten
  2. imperative of planten

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): (Belgium) /plɑnt/, (Netherlands) /plɛnt/
  • Hyphenation: plant

Verb

plant

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of plannen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of plannen

References


French

Etymology

Deverbal of planter. Doublet of plan (plan, map).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /plɑ̃/
  • Homophones: plan, plans, plants

Noun

plant m (plural plants)

  1. seedling
  2. young plant or plantation

Derived terms

  • laisser en plant

Further reading

  • “plant” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

German

Verb

plant

  1. inflection of planen:
    1. third-person singular present
    2. second-person plural present
    3. plural imperative

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French plante (plant).

Noun

plant

  1. plant (organism)

Mauritian Creole

Etymology

From French plante.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [plɑ̃t]

Noun

plant

  1. a plant

Verb

plant

  1. Medial form of plante; to plant.

Middle English

Noun

plant

  1. Alternative form of planete (planet)

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

plant

  1. imperative of plante

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /plɑnt/

Verb

plant

  1. imperative of planta

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /plɑːnt/

Adjective

plant

  1. neuter singular of plan

Old Welsh

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin planta.

Noun

plant pl

  1. children
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Descendants

  • Old Irish: cland
    • Irish: clann
    • Manx: cloan
    • Scottish Gaelic: clann
  • Welsh: plant

Swedish

Adjective

plant

  1. absolute indefinite neuter singular of plan.

Welsh

Etymology

From Old Welsh plant, from Latin planta.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /plant/

Noun

plant m (singulative plentyn)

  1. children, young people
  2. children (of parents), offspring (sometimes of animals), progeny, issue; descendants
    • 1620, Revised version of William Morgan’s translation of the Bible, Joel 1:3:
  3. followers, disciples, servants
  4. people regarded as product of a particular place, time, event, circumstances, etc.

Mutation

References

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “plant”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

West Frisian

Etymology

Ultimately from Latin planta. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun

plant c (plural planten, diminutive plantsje)

  1. plant

Further reading

  • “plant (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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