fountain vs jet what difference

what is difference between fountain and jet

English

Etymology

From Middle English [Term?]; from Old French fontaine (whence modern fontaine); from Late Latin fontana, from Latin fontanus, fontaneus, adjectives from fons (source, spring).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfaʊn.tn̩/
  • (US) IPA(key): [ˈfaʊn.ʔn̩]

Noun

fountain (plural fountains)

  1. (originally) A natural source of water; a spring.
  2. An artificial, usually ornamental, water feature (usually in a garden or public place) consisting of one or more streams of water originating from a statue or other structure.
  3. The structure from which an artificial fountain can issue.
  4. A reservoir from which liquid can be drawn.
  5. A source or origin of a flow (e.g., of favors or knowledge).
    • 1700, Tom Brown, Amusements Serious and Comical, calculated for the Meridian of London, page 5:
      Nothing will pleaſe ſome Men, but Books ſtuff’d with Antiquity, groaning under the weight of Learned Quotations drawn from the Fountains: And what is all this but Pilfering.
  6. (heraldry) A roundel barry wavy argent and azure.
  7. (juggling) A juggling pattern typically done with an even number of props where each prop is caught by the same hand that throws it.
  8. (US) A soda fountain.
    • 2014, Danielle Sarver Coombs, ‎Bob Batchelor, We Are What We Sell: How Advertising Shapes American Life… and Always Has (page 222)
      He takes out a soup bowl, fills it with Pepsi from the fountain, and places it carefully on the counter in front of the boy. “That’ll be a quarter,” he says professionally.
  9. (US) A drink poured from a soda fountain, or the cup it is poured into.
  10. A ground-based firework that projects sparks similar to a water fountain.
  11. (figurative) Anything that resembles a fountain in operation.

Synonyms

  • fount
  • wellspring
  • (heraldry) syke

Derived terms

Related terms

  • font

Translations

Verb

fountain (third-person singular simple present fountains, present participle fountaining, simple past and past participle fountained)

  1. (intransitive) To flow or gush as if from a fountain.
    • 1978, Tom Reamy, Blind Voices
      The fireflies swept toward him from all directions, in streams and rivers and currents of light, a vortex a hundred yards across, spiraling into the brighter center. They met over his supine body like ocean breakers, cascading, fountaining into the air.

Translations

References

Further reading

  • fountain on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • infonaut


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒɛt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Etymology 1

Borrowed from French jet (spurt, literally a throw), from Old French get, giet, from Vulgar Latin *iectus, jectus, from Latin iactus (a throwing, a throw), from iacere (to throw). See abject, ejaculate, gist, jess, jut. Cognate with Spanish echar.

Noun

jet (plural jets)

  1. A collimated stream, spurt or flow of liquid or gas from a pressurized container, an engine, etc.
  2. A spout or nozzle for creating a jet of fluid.
  3. (aviation) A type of airplane using jet engines rather than propellers.
  4. An engine that propels a vehicle using a stream of fluid as propulsion.
    1. A turbine.
    2. A rocket engine.
  5. A part of a carburetor that controls the amount of fuel mixed with the air.
  6. (physics) A narrow cone of hadrons and other particles produced by the hadronization of a quark or gluon.
  7. (dated) Drift; scope; range, as of an argument.
  8. (printing, dated) The sprue of a type, which is broken from it when the type is cold.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

jet (third-person singular simple present jets, present participle jetting, simple past and past participle jetted)

  1. (intransitive) To spray out of a container.
  2. (transitive) To spray with liquid from a container.
  3. (intransitive) To travel on a jet aircraft or otherwise by jet propulsion
  4. (intransitive) To move (running, walking etc.) rapidly around
  5. To shoot forward or out; to project; to jut out.
  6. To strut; to walk with a lofty or haughty gait; to be insolent; to obtrude.
    • c. 1593, William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus, Act II Scene 1,[1]
      Why, lords, and think you not how dangerous
      It is to jet upon a prince’s right?
    • c. 1602, William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, Act II Scene 5,[2]
      Contemplation makes a rare turkey-cock of him: how he jets under his advanced plumes!
  7. To jerk; to jolt; to be shaken.
    • 1719, Richard Wiseman, Serjeant-Chirurgeon to King Charles II, Eight Chirurgical Treatises, London: B. Tooke et al., 5th edition, Volume 2, Book 5, Chapter 4, p. 78,[3]
      A Lady was wounded down the whole Length of the Forehead to the Nose [] It happened to her travelling in a Hackney-Coach, upon the jetting whereof she was thrown out of the hinder Seat against a Bar of Iron in the forepart of the Coach.
  8. To adjust the fuel to air ratio of a carburetor; to install or adjust a carburetor jet
  9. (slang) To leave.
Translations

Adjective

jet (not comparable)

  1. Propelled by turbine engines.
    jet airplane
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English get, geet, gete, from a northern form of Old French jayet, jaiet, gaiet, from Latin gagātēs, from Ancient Greek Γαγάτης (Gagátēs), from Γάγας (Gágas, a town and river in Lycia). Doublet of gagate.

Noun

jet (plural jets)

  1. (mineralogy) A hard, black form of coal, sometimes used in jewellery.
    Hypernyms: lignite, mineraloid
  2. (color) The colour of jet coal, deep grey.
Alternative forms
  • jeat (obsolete)
Derived terms
  • jet-black
Descendants
  • German: Jett
Translations

Adjective

jet (comparative jetter or more jet, superlative jettest or most jet)

  1. Very dark black in colour.
    Synonym: jet-black
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, p. 23:
      She was an ash blonde with greenish eyes, beaded lashes, hair waved smoothly back from ears in which large jet buttons glittered.
Translations

See also

  • Appendix:Colors

Further reading

  • jet in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • jet on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • jet (gemstone) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • tej

Central Franconian

Etymology

From Old High German iowiht, from io (always) + wiht (thing) << Proto-West Germanic *wihti.

Cognate with Middle Dutch iewet, iet (whence Limburgish get, contemporary Dutch iets), English aught.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jɛt/, /jət/

Pronoun

jet (indefinite)

  1. (Ripuarian, northernmost Moselle Franconian) something; anything
    Luur ens, ich hann der jet metjebraht.

    Look, I’ve brought you something.

Synonyms

  • eppes, ebbes (most of Moselle Franconian)

Antonyms

  • nühs (nix)

Czech

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *ěxati, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ey-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jɛt/
  • Homophone: jed
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Verb

jet impf

  1. to ride
  2. to go (by vehicle)

Usage notes

Jet is in the class of Czech concrete verbs. Its counterpart, jezdit, is an abstract verb.

Conjugation

Antonyms

  • nejet

Derived terms

  • dojet
  • nadjet
  • podjet
  • projet
  • přejet
  • objet
  • rozjet
  • ujet
  • vjet
  • zajet

Related terms

See also

  • jezdit

References

Further reading

  • jeti in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • jeti in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

French

Etymology 1

From Old French get, giet, from a Vulgar Latin *iectus, jectus, an alteration of Latin iactus (a throwing, throw).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʒɛ/

Noun

jet m (plural jets)

  1. throw
  2. spurt, spout, jet

Derived terms

Related terms

  • jeter

Descendants

  • English: jet

Further reading

  • “jet” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Etymology 2

From English jet (airplane).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒɛt/

Noun

jet m (plural jets)

  1. jet (airplane)

Further reading

  • “jet” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Friulian

Noun

jet m (plural jets)

  1. bed

Middle English

Noun

jet

  1. Alternative form of get (jet)

Old French

Etymology

From Latin iactus

Noun

jet

  1. throw

Descendants

  • Anglo-Norman: jet
  • French: jet
    • English: jet

Romanian

Etymology

From French jet.

Noun

jet n (plural jeturi)

  1. jet (of a gas of liquid)

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

Unadapted borrowing from English jet.

Pronunciation

Noun

jet m (plural jets)

  1. jet

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