fox vs trick what difference

what is difference between fox and trick

English

Etymology

From Middle English fox, from Old English fox (fox), from Proto-West Germanic *fuhs, from Proto-Germanic *fuhsaz (fox), from Proto-Indo-European *púḱsos (the tailed one), possibly from *puḱ- (tail).

Cognate with Scots fox (fox), West Frisian foks (fox), Fering-Öömrang North Frisian foos and Sölring and Heligoland fos, Dutch vos (fox), Low German vos (fox), German Fuchs (fox), Icelandic fóa (fox), Tocharian B päkā (tail, chowrie), Russian пух (pux, down, fluff), Sanskrit पुच्छ (púccha) (whence Torwali پوش(pūš, fox), Hindi पूंछ (pūñch, tail)).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /fɒks/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /fɑks/
  • Rhymes: -ɒks

Noun

fox (plural foxes or (nonstandard, dialectal) foxen)

  1. A red fox, small carnivore (Vulpes vulpes), related to dogs and wolves, with red or silver fur and a bushy tail.
    • 15th century, The Fox, verse 1:
      The fox went out on a chase one night, / he prayed to the Moon to give him light, / for he had many a mile to go that night / before he reached the town-o, town-o, town-o. / He had many a mile to go that night / before he reached the town-o.
  2. Any of numerous species of small wild canids resembling the red fox. In the taxonomy they form the tribe Vulpini within the family Canidae, consisting of nine genera (see the Wikipedia article on the fox).
  3. The fur of a fox.
  4. A fox terrier.
  5. The gemmeous dragonet, a fish, Callionymus lyra, so called from its yellow color.
  6. A cunning person.
  7. (slang, figuratively) A physically attractive man or woman.
    • 1993, Laura Antoniou, The Marketplace, p.90:
      And Jerry was cute, you know, I liked him, but Frank was a total fox. And he was rougher than Jerry, you know, not so cultured.
  8. (nautical) A small strand of rope made by twisting several rope-yarns together. Used for seizings, mats, sennits, and gaskets.
  9. (mechanics) A wedge driven into the split end of a bolt to tighten it.
  10. A hidden radio transmitter, finding which is the goal of radiosport.
    • 2006, H. Ward Silver, The ARRL Ham Radio License Manual
      Locating a hidden transmitter (the fox) has been a popular ham activity for many years.
  11. (cartomancy) The fourteenth Lenormand card.
  12. (obsolete) A sword; so called from the stamp of a fox on the blade, or perhaps of a wolf taken for a fox.

Synonyms

  • (a mammal related to dogs and wolves): tod
  • (attractive man or woman): see also Thesaurus:beautiful woman

Hypernyms

  • canid

Hyponyms

  • vixen (feminine form)

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Cheyenne: vóhkéso
  • Japanese: フォックス (fokkusu)
  • Maori: pōkiha

Translations

See also

  • (canids) canid; coyote, dog, fox, jackal, wolf (Category: en:Canids)
  • Reynard
  • kitsune
  • cub

References

  • Fox in the 1921 edition of Collier’s Encyclopedia.

Verb

fox (third-person singular simple present foxes, present participle foxing, simple past and past participle foxed)

  1. (transitive) To trick, fool or outwit (someone) by cunning or ingenuity.
  2. (transitive) To confuse or baffle (someone).
    This crossword puzzle has completely foxed me.
  3. (intransitive) To act slyly or craftily.
  4. (intransitive) To discolour paper. Fox marks are spots on paper caused by humidity. (See foxing.)
    The pages of the book show distinct foxing.
  5. (transitive) To make sour, as beer, by causing it to ferment.
  6. (intransitive) To turn sour; said of beer, etc., when it sours in fermenting.
  7. (transitive) To intoxicate; to stupefy with drink.
    • I drank [] so much wine that I was almost foxed.
  8. (transitive) To repair (boots) with new front upper leather, or to piece the upper fronts of.

Derived terms

  • outfox

Translations

Anagrams

  • Oxf.

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • vox, wox

Etymology

From Old English fox, from Proto-West Germanic *fuhs, from Proto-Germanic *fuhsaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔks/
  • Rhymes: -ɔks

Noun

fox (plural foxes or fox)

  1. A fox or its fur.
  2. A lier or schemer.

Descendants

  • English: fox
  • Scots: fox
  • Yola: voxe

References

  • “fox, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *fuhs, from Proto-Germanic *fuhsaz. Cognate with Old Frisian *foks, Old Saxon fohs, Old Dutch fus, Old High German fuhs.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /foks/

Noun

fox m (nominative plural foxas)

  1. fox

Declension

Derived terms

  • foxhol

Descendants

  • Middle English: fox, vox, wox
    • English: fox
    • Scots: fox
    • Yola: voxe

Old French

Alternative forms

  • fols, fous

Adjective

fox

  1. nominative and oblique masculine singular of fol

Romanian

Etymology

From French fox.

Noun

fox m (plural focși)

  1. fox terrier

Declension



English

Etymology

Uncertain.

  • Perhaps from From Middle English *trikke, from Old Northern French trique (related to Old French trichier; French: tricher), itself possibly from Middle High German trechen (to launch a shot at, play a trick on), but the Old French verb more likely is derived from Vulgar Latin *triccāre, from Late Latin tricāre, from Latin trīcor, trīcārī (behave in an evasive manner, search for detours; trifle, delay).
  • Alternatively, perhaps from Dutch trek (a pull, draw, trick), from trekken (to draw), from Middle Dutch trekken, trēken (to pull, place, put, move), from Old Dutch *trekkan, *trekan (to move, drag), from Proto-Germanic *trakjaną, *trekaną (to drag, scrape, pull), from Proto-Indo-European *dreg- (to drag, scrape).

If the second proposal is correct, the term is cognate with Low German trekken, Middle High German trecken, trechen, Danish trække, and Old Frisian trekka, Romanian truc and other Romance languages.

Compare track, treachery, trig, and trigger.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: trĭk, IPA(key): /tɹɪk/, [t̠ʰɹ̠̊ɪk], [tʃɹ̠̊ɪk]
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Noun

trick (plural tricks)

  1. Something designed to fool or swindle.
  2. A single element of a magician’s (or any variety entertainer’s) act; a magic trick.
  3. An entertaining difficult physical action.
    • 1995, All Aboard for Space: Introducing Space to Youngsters (page 158)
      Yo-yo tricks involving sleeping the yo-yo (like “walking the dog” and “rocking the baby”) cannot be performed in space.
  4. An effective, clever or quick way of doing something.
  5. Mischievous or annoying behavior; a prank.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Prior to this entry?)
  6. (dated) A particular habit or manner; a peculiarity; a trait.
    • c. 1595, William Shakespeare, King John Act I, scene I
      He hath a trick of Cœur de Lion’s face.
    • 1606, William Shakespeare, King Lear act IV, scene VI:
      The trick of that voice I do well remember.
  7. A knot, braid, or plait of hair.
    • I cannot tell , but it stirs me more than all your court curls , or your spangles , or your tricks
  8. (card games) A sequence in which each player plays a card and a winning play is determined.
  9. (slang) A sex act, chiefly one performed for payment; an act of prostitution.
    • 1988, John H. Lindquist, Misdemeanor Crime: Trivial Criminal Pursuit, page 43:
      Perhaps the most important thing a prostitute learns is how to “manage” the client; how to con him into spending more money than he planned. Learning how to perform tricks takes only a few minutes. Learning how to “hustle” the client takes longer.
    • 2010, Richard Gill, Paloma Azul, page 139:
      “How did you get into all this?” “I started doing tricks when I was young and I don’t mean the magic circle. I learned about sex from an early age. There was nothing else to do in Pitsea except heavy petting and getting F grades at school.”
    • 2019, Julie S. Draskoczy, Belomor: Criminality and Creativity in Stalin’s Gulag:
      When he later asked her to strip and perform tricks for him, she refused, and he chased her away. She had similar experiences with other men until she eventually fell into prostitution: []
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:trick.
  10. (slang) A customer to a prostitute.
    • 2011, Iceberg Slim, Pimp: The Story of My Life (page 99)
      Ten minutes after she got down she broke luck. A white trick in a thirty-seven Buick picked her up. I timed her. She had racehorse speed.
  11. A daily period of work, especially in shift-based jobs.
    • 1899, New York (State), Bureau of Statistics, Deptartment of Labor, Annual Report:
      Woodside Junction—On 8 hour basis, first trick $60, second trick $60, third trick $50.
    • 1949, Labor arbitration reports, page 738
      The Union contends that Fifer was entitled to promotion to the position of Group Leader on the third trick in the Core Room Department.
  12. (nautical) A sailor’s spell of work at the helm, usually two hours long.
  13. A toy; a trifle; a plaything.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, The Passionate Pilgrim
      the tricks and toyes that in them lurke,

Synonyms

  • (something designed to fool): artifice, con, gambit, ploy, rip-off, See also Thesaurus:deception
  • (magic trick): illusion, magic trick, sleight of hand
  • (customer to a prostitute): john, see also Thesaurus:prostitute’s client
  • (entertaining difficult physical action):
  • (daily period of work): shift

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

trick (third-person singular simple present tricks, present participle tricking, simple past and past participle tricked)

  1. (transitive) To fool; to cause to believe something untrue; to deceive.
  2. (heraldry) To draw (as opposed to blazon – to describe in words).
    • They forget that they are in the statutes: [] there they are trick’d, they and their pedigrees.
  3. To dress; to decorate; to adorn fantastically; often followed by up, off, or out.
    • 1735, Alexander Pope, Of the Characters of Women
      Trick her off in air.
    • 1693, John Locke, Some Thoughts Concerning Education
      Tricking up their children in fine clothes.
    • 1825, Thomas Macaulay, An Essay on John Milton
      They are simple, but majestic, records of the feelings of the poet; as little tricked out for the public eye as his diary would have been.

Synonyms

  • (to fool): con, dupe, fool, gull, have, hoodwink, pull the wool over someone’s eyes, rip off
  • (to trick out): mod
  • See also Thesaurus:deceive

Derived terms

Translations

Adjective

trick (comparative tricker, superlative trickest)

  1. Involving trickery or deception.
  2. Able to perform tricks.
  3. Defective or unreliable.
  4. (chiefly US, slang) Stylish or cool.

Danish

Etymology

From English trick.

Pronunciation

IPA(key): [ˈtˢʁɛɡ̊]

Noun

trick (singular definite tricket, plural indefinite trickene)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Synonyms

  • kneb

Further reading

  • “trick” in Den Danske Ordbog

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