fraud vs impostor what difference

what is difference between fraud and impostor

English

Etymology

From Middle English fraude (recorded since 1345), from Old French fraude, a borrowing from Latin fraus (deceit, injury, offence).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fɹɔːd/
  • (US) enPR: frôd, IPA(key): /fɹɔd/
  • (cotcaught merger, Inland Northern American) enPR: frŏd, IPA(key): /fɹɑd/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːd

Noun

fraud (countable and uncountable, plural frauds)

  1. (law) The crime of stealing or otherwise illegally obtaining money by use of deception tactics.
  2. Any act of deception carried out for the purpose of unfair, undeserved and/or unlawful gain.
  3. The assumption of a false identity to such deceptive end.
  4. A person who performs any such trick.
  5. (obsolete) A trap or snare.

Synonyms

  • swindle
  • scam
  • (criminal) deceit
  • trickery
  • hoky-poky
  • imposture
  • (person) faker, fraudster, impostor, cheat(er), trickster
  • grift

Related terms

  • defraud
  • fraudulence
  • fraudulent
  • fraudulently
  • fraudulentness
  • insurance fraud
  • mail fraud
  • pious fraud
  • wire fraud

Translations

Verb

fraud (third-person singular simple present frauds, present participle frauding, simple past and past participle frauded)

  1. (obsolete) To defraud

Translations

See also

  • embezzlement
  • false billing
  • false advertising
  • forgery
  • identity theft
  • predatory lending
  • quackery
  • usury
  • white-collar crime

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

fraud f

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 1938; superseded by frau


English

Alternative forms

  • imposter
  • impostour (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle French imposteur.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪmˈpɒstə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪmˈpɑstɚ/
  • Hyphenation: im‧pos‧tor

Noun

impostor (plural impostors)

  1. Someone who attempts to deceive by using an assumed name or identity.
  2. (computer graphics) A sprite or animation integrated into a three-dimensional scene, but not based on an actual 3D model.

Synonyms

  • impersonator
  • See also Thesaurus:deceiver

Hyponyms

  • quack

Derived terms

Translations


Catalan

Etymology

From Late Latin impostor.

Noun

impostor m (plural impostors, feminine impostora)

  1. impostor (someone who uses a false identity)

Further reading

  • “impostor” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “impostor” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “impostor” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “impostor” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Galician

Etymology

From Late Latin impostor.

Noun

impostor m (plural impostores, feminine impostora, feminine plural impostoras)

  1. impostor (someone who uses a false identity)

Further reading

  • “impostor” in Dicionario da Real Academia Galega, Royal Galician Academy.

Portuguese

Etymology

From Late Latin impostor.

Noun

impostor m (plural impostores, feminine impostora, feminine plural impostoras)

  1. impostor (someone who uses a false identity)

Related terms

  • impor
  • imposto

Further reading

  • “impostor” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Romanian

Etymology

From French imposteur

Noun

impostor m (plural impostori)

  1. impostor

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

From Late Latin impostor. Cognate with English impostor.

Noun

impostor m (plural impostores, feminine impostora, feminine plural impostoras)

  1. impostor (someone who uses a false identity)

Related terms

  • impuesto
  • imponer

Further reading

  • “impostor” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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