fraught vs pregnant what difference

what is difference between fraught and pregnant

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fɹɔːt/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːt
  • (US) IPA(key): /fɹɔt/, /fɹɑt/
  • Homophone: frot (in accents with the cot-caught merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English fraught, freght, from Middle Dutch vracht or Middle Low German vracht (freight money), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *fra- (intensive prefix) + Proto-Germanic *aihtiz (possession), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eyḱ- (to possess). Cognate with Old High German frēht (earnings), Old English ǣht (owndom), and a doublet of freight. More at for-, own. Adjective from Middle English, passive participle of the verb fraughten, from Middle Dutch vrachten.

Noun

fraught (usually uncountable, plural fraughts)

  1. (obsolete) The hire of a ship or boat to transport cargo.
  2. (obsolete) Money paid to hire a ship or boat to transport cargo; freight
    fraught money.
  3. (obsolete) The transportation of goods, especially in a ship or boat.
  4. (obsolete) A ship’s cargo, lading or freight.
  5. (Scotland) A load; a burden.
  6. (Scotland) Two bucketfuls (of water).
Derived terms
  • fraught-free
Related terms
  • freight

Etymology 2

From Middle English fraughten, fraghten, freghten, from Middle Dutch vrachten, vrechten, from the noun (see above).

Verb

fraught (third-person singular simple present fraughts, present participle fraughting, simple past and past participle fraughted)

  1. (transitive, obsolete except in past participle) To load (a ship, cargo etc.).
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To form the cargo of a vessel.
    • 1610, William Shakespeare, The Tempest
      Had I been any god of power, I would / Have sunk the sea within the earth, or e’er / It should the good ship so have swallow’d and / The fraughting souls within her.

Adjective

fraught (comparative more fraught, superlative most fraught)

  1. (of a cargo-carrier) Laden.
  2. (figuratively, with with) Loaded up or charged with; accompanied by; entailing.
    • a discourse fraught with all the commending excellences of speech
    • a. 1865, Isaac Taylor, Epidemic Whims
      enterprises fraught with world-wide benefits
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 236d.
      [] all these matters are fraught with paradox, just as they always have been
  3. (with with) Furnished, equipped.
  4. Distressed or causing distress, for example through complexity.
    a fraught relationship; a fraught process
Translations

References

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “fraught”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “fraught”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.


English

Alternative forms

  • prægnant (obsolete)
  • pregnaunt (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɹɛɡnənt/

Etymology 1

From Middle English preignant, from Old French preignant, pregnant, also prenant (compare archaic Modern French prégnant), and their source, Latin praegnāns (pregnant), probably from prae- (pre-) + gnascī (to be born). Displaced Old English bearnēacen (literally “child-increased”).

Adjective

pregnant (comparative more pregnant, superlative most pregnant)

  1. (chiefly not comparable) Carrying developing offspring within the body.
    1. Of a couple: expecting a baby together.
  2. (comparable) Having numerous possibilities or implications; full of promise; abounding in ability, resources, etc.
  3. (poetic) Fertile, prolific (usually of soil, ground, etc.).
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.vi:
      The sunne-beames bright vpon her body playd, / Being through former bathing mollifide, / And pierst into her wombe, where they embayd / With so sweet sence and secret power vnspide, / That in her pregnant flesh they shortly fructifide.
  4. (obsolete) Affording entrance; receptive; yielding; willing; open; prompt.
  5. (obsolete) Ready-witted; clever; ingenious.
Synonyms
  • (carrying offspring (standard)): expecting, expecting a baby, expectant, gravid (of animals only), with child, fertilized
  • (carrying offspring (colloquial/slang)): eating for two, having a bun in the oven, in a family way, knocked up, preggers, up the duff, up the spout
  • (carrying offspring (euphemistic)): in an interesting condition, in a family way
  • (having many possibilities or implications): meaningful, significant
  • See also Thesaurus:pregnant
Hyponyms
  • (carrying developing offspring): in trouble
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

pregnant (plural pregnants)

  1. A pregnant person.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dunglison to this entry?)

Etymology 2

Apparently from Middle French pregnant, preignant (pressing, compelling), present participle of prembre (to press), from Latin premere (to press).

Adjective

pregnant (comparative more pregnant, superlative most pregnant)

  1. (now rare) Compelling; clear, evident. [from 14th c.]
    • 1751, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, I.18:
      Peregrine was in a little time a distinguished character, not only for his acuteness of apprehension, but also for that mischievous fertility of fancy, of which we have already given such pregnant examples.

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French pregnant, from Old French pregnant, from Latin praegnāns.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /prɛxˈnɑnt/
  • Hyphenation: preg‧nant
  • Rhymes: -ɑnt

Adjective

pregnant (comparative pregnanter, superlative pregnantst)

  1. poignant, incisive
  2. meaningful, polysemic
  3. (obsolete) important

Inflection


Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from German prägnant and French prégnant.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /preɡˈnant/

Adjective

pregnant m or n (feminine singular pregnantă, masculine plural pregnanți, feminine and neuter plural pregnante)

  1. pregnant (having many possibilities or implications)

Declension


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