fray vs frazzle what difference

what is difference between fray and frazzle

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: frā, IPA(key): /fɹeɪ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪ

Etymology 1

From Middle English fraien, borrowed from Old French frayer, from Latin fricāre, present active infinitive of fricō.

Verb

fray (third-person singular simple present frays, present participle fraying, simple past and past participle frayed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To (cause to) unravel; used particularly for the edge of something made of cloth, or the end of a rope.
  2. (intransitive, figuratively) To cause exhaustion, wear out (a person’s mental strength).
    (Metaphorical use; nerves are visualised as strings)
  3. (transitive, archaic) frighten; alarm
    • And the carcases of this people shall be meat for the fowls of the heaven, and for the beasts of the earth; and none shall fray them away.
    • 1662, Henry More, An Antidote Against Atheism, Book II, A Collection of Several Philosophical Writings of Dr. Henry More, p. 63:
      “Besides, all the wit and Philosophy in the world can never demonstrate, that the killing and slaughtering of a Beast is anymore then the striking of a Bush where a Bird’s Nest is, where you fray away the Bird, and then seize upon the empty Nest.”
    • 1830, Isaac Taylor, The Natural History of Enthusiasm
      the many checks and reverses which belong to the common course of human life , usually fray it away from present scenes
  4. (transitive) To bear the expense of; to defray.
    • 1631, Philip Massinger, The Emperor of the East
      The charge of my most curious and costly ingredients frayed, I shall acknowledge myself amply satisfied.
  5. (intransitive) To rub.
    • 1808, Walter Scott, Hunting Song

Derived terms

Related terms

  • friction
  • fricative
  • affricate
  • dentifrice

Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English frai, aphetic variant of affray.

Noun

fray (plural frays)

  1. A fight or argument
  2. (archaic) Fright.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • affray

Translations


Spanish

Etymology

Apocope of fraile (friar).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɾai/, [ˈfɾai̯]

Noun

fray m (plural frayes)

  1. friar

Synonyms

  • fr.


English

Etymology

Originally an East Anglian word. Either from a variant of the now obsolete fazle (to unravel), altered due to influence from fray, or from a blend of fazle and fray. fazle comes from earlier fasel, which was inherited from Middle English facelyn ([of the end of a rope, or of cloth] to unravel). Middle English facelyn was a verbal derivative of the noun fasylle (frayed edge), which was in turn a derivative (with the diminutive suffix -el) of Old English fæs (fringe, border), from Proto-West Germanic *fas, from Proto-Germanic *fasōn.

Related to German Faser (fibre).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfræzl̩/
  • Rhymes: -æzəl

Verb

frazzle (third-person singular simple present frazzles, present participle frazzling, simple past and past participle frazzled)

  1. (transitive) To fray or wear down, especially at the edges.
    • 1887, Joel Chandler Harris, Free Joe and Other Georgian Sketches
      Her hair was of a reddish-gray color, and its frazzled and tangled condition suggested that the woman had recently passed through a period of extreme excitement.
  2. (transitive) To drain emotionally or physically.
  3. (transitive) to burn

Noun

frazzle (plural frazzles)

  1. (informal) A burnt fragment; a cinder or crisp.
    The bacon was burned to a frazzle.
  2. (informal) The condition or quality of being frazzled; a frayed end.
    • 1897, Rudyard Kipling, Captains Courageous Chapter III
      My fingers are all cut to frazzles.
    • 1886-90, John G. Nicolay and John Hay, Abraham Lincoln: A History
      Gordon had sent word to Lee that he “had fought his corps to a frazzle.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial