fray vs rub what difference

what is difference between fray and rub

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: frā, IPA(key): /fɹeɪ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪ

Etymology 1

From Middle English fraien, borrowed from Old French frayer, from Latin fricāre, present active infinitive of fricō.

Verb

fray (third-person singular simple present frays, present participle fraying, simple past and past participle frayed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To (cause to) unravel; used particularly for the edge of something made of cloth, or the end of a rope.
  2. (intransitive, figuratively) To cause exhaustion, wear out (a person’s mental strength).
    (Metaphorical use; nerves are visualised as strings)
  3. (transitive, archaic) frighten; alarm
    • And the carcases of this people shall be meat for the fowls of the heaven, and for the beasts of the earth; and none shall fray them away.
    • 1662, Henry More, An Antidote Against Atheism, Book II, A Collection of Several Philosophical Writings of Dr. Henry More, p. 63:
      “Besides, all the wit and Philosophy in the world can never demonstrate, that the killing and slaughtering of a Beast is anymore then the striking of a Bush where a Bird’s Nest is, where you fray away the Bird, and then seize upon the empty Nest.”
    • 1830, Isaac Taylor, The Natural History of Enthusiasm
      the many checks and reverses which belong to the common course of human life , usually fray it away from present scenes
  4. (transitive) To bear the expense of; to defray.
    • 1631, Philip Massinger, The Emperor of the East
      The charge of my most curious and costly ingredients frayed, I shall acknowledge myself amply satisfied.
  5. (intransitive) To rub.
    • 1808, Walter Scott, Hunting Song

Derived terms

Related terms

  • friction
  • fricative
  • affricate
  • dentifrice

Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English frai, aphetic variant of affray.

Noun

fray (plural frays)

  1. A fight or argument
  2. (archaic) Fright.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • affray

Translations


Spanish

Etymology

Apocope of fraile (friar).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɾai/, [ˈfɾai̯]

Noun

fray m (plural frayes)

  1. friar

Synonyms

  • fr.


English

Etymology

From Middle English rubben, possibly from Low German rubben, rubbeling or Saterland Frisian rubben. Or, of North Germanic origin, such as Swedish rubba (to move, scrub), all from Proto-Germanic *reufaną (to tear).

Cognate with Saterland Frisian rubje (to rub, scrape), German Low German rubben (to rub), Low German rubblig (rough, uneven), Dutch robben, rubben (to rub smooth; scrape; scrub), Danish rubbe (to rub, scrub), Icelandic and Norwegian rubba (to scrape).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɹʌb/, [ɹɐb], enPR: rŭb
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɹʌb/, enPR: rŭb
  • Rhymes: -ʌb

Noun

rub (plural rubs)

  1. An act of rubbing.
  2. A difficulty or problem.
  3. (archaic) A quip or sarcastic remark.
  4. In the game of crown green bowls, any obstacle by which a bowl is diverted from its normal course.
  5. Any substance designed to be applied by rubbing.
    1. A mixture of spices applied to meat before it is barbecued.
  6. (Britain, naval slang) A loan.

Synonyms

  • (a difficulty or problem): hitch, hiccup, catch, kink, glitch, snag

Translations

Verb

rub (third-person singular simple present rubs, present participle rubbing, simple past and past participle rubbed)

  1. (transitive) To move (one object) while maintaining contact with another object over some area, with pressure and friction.
  2. (transitive) To rub something against (a second thing).
    • 1536 (originally published, the quote if from a later edited version of unknown date), Thomas Elyot, The Castel of Helth
      It shall be expedient, after that body is cleaned, to rub the body with a coarse linen cloth.
  3. (intransitive) To be rubbed against something.
  4. (transitive) To spread a substance thinly over; to smear.
  5. (dated) To move or pass with difficulty.
  6. To scour; to burnish; to polish; to brighten; to cleanse; often with up or over.
    • a. 1716, Robert South, Man Created in God’s Image
      The whole business of our redemption is, in short, only to rub over the defaced copy of the creation
  7. To hinder; to cross; to thwart.
  8. (transitive, bowls) To touch the jack with the bowl.

Derived terms

Translations

Further reading

  • rub in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • rub in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • rub at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “rub”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

References

Anagrams

  • bru, bur, bur-

Czech

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *rǫbъ (something which was cut), from *rǫbati (to cut, chop).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rup/
  • Rhymes: -up
  • Homophone: rup

Noun

rub m

  1. back (the reverse side)
  2. the other (often negative) aspect of a situation

Declension

Antonyms

  • líc

Derived terms

  • naruby

See also

  • vzhůru nohama
  • rubat
  • rub on the Czech Wikipedia.Wikipedia cs

References

Further reading

  • rub in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • rub in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Lower Sorbian

Alternative forms

  • rubaj

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [rup]

Verb

rub

  1. second-person singular imperative of rubaś

Manx

Etymology

Borrowed from English rub.

Noun

rub m (genitive singular rub, plural rubbyn)

  1. rub

Verb

rub (verbal noun rubbey or rubbal)

  1. to rub

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *rǫbъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rûːb/

Noun

rȗb m (Cyrillic spelling ру̑б)

  1. rim
  2. edge, brink

Declension


Yola

Etymology

From Middle English ribbe, from Old English ribb, from Proto-West Germanic *ribi.

Noun

rub (plural rubbès)

  1. a rib

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith

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