free vs justify what difference

what is difference between free and justify

English

Etymology

From Middle English free, fre, freo, from Old English frēo (free), from Proto-West Germanic *frī, from Proto-Germanic *frijaz (beloved, not in bondage), from Proto-Indo-European *priHós (dear, beloved), from *preyH- (to love, please). Related to friend. Cognate with West Frisian frij (free), Dutch vrij (free), Low German free (free), German frei (free), Danish, Swedish and Norwegian fri (free), Sanskrit प्रिय (priyá).

Germanic and Celtic are the only Indo-European language branches in which the PIE word with the meaning of “dear, beloved” acquired the additional meaning of “free” in the sense of “not in bondage”. This was an extension of the idea of “characteristic of those who are dear and beloved”, in other words friends and tribe members (in contrast to unfree inhabitants from other tribes and prisoners of war, many of which were among the slaves – compare the Latin use of liberi to mean both “free persons” and “children of a family”).

The verb comes from Middle English freen, freoȝen, from Old English frēon, frēoġan (to free; make free), from Proto-West Germanic *frijōn, from Proto-Germanic *frijōną, from Proto-Indo-European *preyH-.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: frē, IPA(key): /fɹiː/, [fɹɪi̯]
  • Rhymes: -iː
  • Homophone: three (with th-fronting)

Adjective

free (comparative freer or free-er or (rare) freeër, superlative freest or free-est or (rare) freeëst)

  1. (social) Unconstrained.
    • 1610-11?, Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act V, scene i:
      Quickly, spirit! / Thou shalt ere long be free.
    Synonyms: unconstrained, unfettered, unhindered
    Antonyms: constrained, restricted
    1. Not imprisoned or enslaved.
      Antonyms: bound, enslaved, imprisoned
    2. Unconstrained by timidity or distrust
      Synonyms: unreserved, frank, communicative
    3. Generous; liberal.
    4. (obsolete) Clear of offence or crime; guiltless; innocent.
    5. Without obligations.
    6. Thrown open, or made accessible, to all; to be enjoyed without limitations; unrestricted; not obstructed, engrossed, or appropriated; open; said of a thing to be possessed or enjoyed.
    7. Not arbitrary or despotic; assuring liberty; defending individual rights against encroachment by any person or class; instituted by a free people; said of a government, institutions, etc.
    8. (software) With no or only freedom-preserving limitations on distribution or modification.
      Synonym: libre
      Antonym: proprietary
    9. (software) Intended for release, as opposed to a checked version.
  2. Obtainable without any payment.
    Synonyms: free of charge, gratis
    1. (by extension, chiefly advertising slang) complimentary
  3. (abstract) Unconstrained.
    1. (mathematics) Unconstrained by relators.
    2. (mathematics, logic) Unconstrained by quantifiers.
      Antonym: bound
    3. (programming) Unconstrained of identifiers, not bound.
      Synonym: unbound
      Antonym: bound
    4. (linguistics) (of a morpheme) That can be used by itself, unattached to another morpheme.
  4. (physical) Unconstrained.
    1. Unobstructed, without blockages.
      Synonyms: clear, unobstructed
      Antonyms: blocked, obstructed
    2. Unattached or uncombined.
      Synonyms: loose, unfastened; see also Thesaurus:loose
    3. Not currently in use; not taken; unoccupied.
    4. (botany, mycology) Not attached; loose.
  5. Without; not containing (what is specified); exempt; clear; liberated.
    Synonym: without
  6. (dated) Ready; eager; acting without spurring or whipping; spirited.
  7. (dated) Invested with a particular freedom or franchise; enjoying certain immunities or privileges; admitted to special rights; followed by of.
  8. (Britain, law, obsolete) Certain or honourable; the opposite of base.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burrill to this entry?)
  9. (law) Privileged or individual; the opposite of common.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burrill to this entry?)

Antonyms

  • unfree

Hyponyms

  • -free

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Adverb

free (comparative more free, superlative most free)

  1. Without needing to pay.
    Synonyms: for free, for nothing
  2. (obsolete) Freely; willingly.

Translations

Verb

free (third-person singular simple present frees, present participle freeing, simple past and past participle freed)

  1. (transitive) To make free; set at liberty; release.
  2. (transitive) To rid of something that confines or oppresses.
    • 1885, Richard F. Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Night 564:
      Then I walked about, till I found on the further side, a great river of sweet water, running with a strong current; whereupon I called to mind the boat-raft I had made aforetime and said to myself, “Needs must I make another; haply I may free me from this strait. If I escape, I have my desire and I vow to Allah Almighty to forswear travel; and if I perish I shall be at peace and shall rest from toil and moil.”

Derived terms

  • befree

Synonyms

  • befree
  • emancipate
  • let loose
  • liberate
  • manumit
  • release
  • unchain
  • unfetter
  • unshackle

Translations

Noun

free (plural frees)

  1. (Australian rules football, Gaelic football) Abbreviation of free kick.
    • 2006, [1]:
      Whether deserved or not, the free gave Cresswell the chance to cover himself in glory with a shot on goal after the siren.
  2. free transfer
  3. (hurling) The usual means of restarting play after a foul is committed, where the non-offending team restarts from where the foul was committed.
  4. (swimming) the freestyle stroke

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • feer, fere, reef

Galician

Verb

free

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of frear
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of frear

Low German

Alternative forms

  • frie (more common)

Etymology

From Middle Low German vrîe, variant of vrî, from Old Saxon frī, from Proto-Germanic *frijaz, from Proto-Indo-European *prey (new). Compare Dutch vrij, West Frisian frij, English free, German frei.

Adjective

free (comparative fre’er, superlative freest)

  1. (rather rare) free

Declension

Derived terms

  • Freeheit


English

Alternative forms

  • justifie (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English justifien, from Old French justifier, from Late Latin justificare (make just), from Latin justus, iustus (just) + ficare (make), from facere, equivalent to just +‎ -ify.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdʒʌstɪfaɪ/
  • Hyphenation: jus‧ti‧fy

Verb

justify (third-person singular simple present justifies, present participle justifying, simple past and past participle justified)

  1. (transitive) To provide an acceptable explanation for.
    How can you justify spending so much money on clothes?
    Paying too much for car insurance is not justified.
  2. (transitive) To be a good, acceptable reason for; warrant.
    Nothing can justify your rude behaviour last night.
    • 1861, Edward Everett, The Great Issues Now Before the Country, An oration delivered at the New York Academy of Music, July 4, 1861, New York: James G. Gregory, p. 8,[1]
      Unless the oppression is so extreme as to justify revolution, it would not justify the evil of breaking up a government, under an abstract constitutional right to do so.
  3. (transitive) To arrange (text) on a page or a computer screen such that the left and right ends of all lines within paragraphs are aligned.
    The text will look better justified.
  4. (transitive) To absolve, and declare to be free of blame or sin.
    • c. 1590, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 2, Act II, Scene 3,[2]
      I cannot justify whom the law condemns.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Acts 13.39,[3]
      And by him all that believe are justified from all things, from which ye could not be justified by the law of Moses.
  5. (reflexive) To give reasons for one’s actions; to make an argument to prove that one is in the right.
    She felt no need to justify herself for deciding not to invite him.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Luke 16.15,[4]
      And he said unto them, Ye are they which justify yourselves before men; but God knoweth your hearts: for that which is highly esteemed among men is abomination in the sight of God.
    • 1848, Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, Chapter 13,[5]
      [] I was equally unable to justify myself and unwilling to acknowledge my errors []
  6. To prove; to ratify; to confirm.
    • c. 1608, William Shakespeare, Pericles, Prince of Tyre, Act V, Scene 1,[6]
      She is not dead at Tarsus, as she should have been,
      By savage Cleon: she shall tell thee all;
      When thou shalt kneel, and justify in knowledge
      She is thy very princess.
    • c. 1610, William Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale, Act I, Scene 2,[7]
      [] say
      My wife’s a hobby-horse, deserves a name
      As rank as any flax-wench that puts to
      Before her troth-plight: say’t and justify’t.
  7. (law) To show (a person) to have had a sufficient legal reason for an act that has been made the subject of a charge or accusation.
  8. (law) To qualify (oneself) as a surety by taking oath to the ownership of sufficient property.
    • 1839, John Bouvier, A Law Dictionary Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States of America and of the Several States of the American Union, Philadelphia: T. & J.W. Johnson, Volume I, p. 557,[8]
      JUSTIFYING BAIL, practice, is the production of bail in court, who there justify themselves against the exception of the plaintiff.

Related terms

  • -fy
  • just
  • justification
  • justifiable
  • justifiably
  • unjustified

Translations


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