free vs release what difference

what is difference between free and release

English

Etymology

From Middle English free, fre, freo, from Old English frēo (free), from Proto-West Germanic *frī, from Proto-Germanic *frijaz (beloved, not in bondage), from Proto-Indo-European *priHós (dear, beloved), from *preyH- (to love, please). Related to friend. Cognate with West Frisian frij (free), Dutch vrij (free), Low German free (free), German frei (free), Danish, Swedish and Norwegian fri (free), Sanskrit प्रिय (priyá).

Germanic and Celtic are the only Indo-European language branches in which the PIE word with the meaning of “dear, beloved” acquired the additional meaning of “free” in the sense of “not in bondage”. This was an extension of the idea of “characteristic of those who are dear and beloved”, in other words friends and tribe members (in contrast to unfree inhabitants from other tribes and prisoners of war, many of which were among the slaves – compare the Latin use of liberi to mean both “free persons” and “children of a family”).

The verb comes from Middle English freen, freoȝen, from Old English frēon, frēoġan (to free; make free), from Proto-West Germanic *frijōn, from Proto-Germanic *frijōną, from Proto-Indo-European *preyH-.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: frē, IPA(key): /fɹiː/, [fɹɪi̯]
  • Rhymes: -iː
  • Homophone: three (with th-fronting)

Adjective

free (comparative freer or free-er or (rare) freeër, superlative freest or free-est or (rare) freeëst)

  1. (social) Unconstrained.
    • 1610-11?, Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act V, scene i:
      Quickly, spirit! / Thou shalt ere long be free.
    Synonyms: unconstrained, unfettered, unhindered
    Antonyms: constrained, restricted
    1. Not imprisoned or enslaved.
      Antonyms: bound, enslaved, imprisoned
    2. Unconstrained by timidity or distrust
      Synonyms: unreserved, frank, communicative
    3. Generous; liberal.
    4. (obsolete) Clear of offence or crime; guiltless; innocent.
    5. Without obligations.
    6. Thrown open, or made accessible, to all; to be enjoyed without limitations; unrestricted; not obstructed, engrossed, or appropriated; open; said of a thing to be possessed or enjoyed.
    7. Not arbitrary or despotic; assuring liberty; defending individual rights against encroachment by any person or class; instituted by a free people; said of a government, institutions, etc.
    8. (software) With no or only freedom-preserving limitations on distribution or modification.
      Synonym: libre
      Antonym: proprietary
    9. (software) Intended for release, as opposed to a checked version.
  2. Obtainable without any payment.
    Synonyms: free of charge, gratis
    1. (by extension, chiefly advertising slang) complimentary
  3. (abstract) Unconstrained.
    1. (mathematics) Unconstrained by relators.
    2. (mathematics, logic) Unconstrained by quantifiers.
      Antonym: bound
    3. (programming) Unconstrained of identifiers, not bound.
      Synonym: unbound
      Antonym: bound
    4. (linguistics) (of a morpheme) That can be used by itself, unattached to another morpheme.
  4. (physical) Unconstrained.
    1. Unobstructed, without blockages.
      Synonyms: clear, unobstructed
      Antonyms: blocked, obstructed
    2. Unattached or uncombined.
      Synonyms: loose, unfastened; see also Thesaurus:loose
    3. Not currently in use; not taken; unoccupied.
    4. (botany, mycology) Not attached; loose.
  5. Without; not containing (what is specified); exempt; clear; liberated.
    Synonym: without
  6. (dated) Ready; eager; acting without spurring or whipping; spirited.
  7. (dated) Invested with a particular freedom or franchise; enjoying certain immunities or privileges; admitted to special rights; followed by of.
  8. (Britain, law, obsolete) Certain or honourable; the opposite of base.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burrill to this entry?)
  9. (law) Privileged or individual; the opposite of common.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burrill to this entry?)

Antonyms

  • unfree

Hyponyms

  • -free

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Adverb

free (comparative more free, superlative most free)

  1. Without needing to pay.
    Synonyms: for free, for nothing
  2. (obsolete) Freely; willingly.

Translations

Verb

free (third-person singular simple present frees, present participle freeing, simple past and past participle freed)

  1. (transitive) To make free; set at liberty; release.
  2. (transitive) To rid of something that confines or oppresses.
    • 1885, Richard F. Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Night 564:
      Then I walked about, till I found on the further side, a great river of sweet water, running with a strong current; whereupon I called to mind the boat-raft I had made aforetime and said to myself, “Needs must I make another; haply I may free me from this strait. If I escape, I have my desire and I vow to Allah Almighty to forswear travel; and if I perish I shall be at peace and shall rest from toil and moil.”

Derived terms

  • befree

Synonyms

  • befree
  • emancipate
  • let loose
  • liberate
  • manumit
  • release
  • unchain
  • unfetter
  • unshackle

Translations

Noun

free (plural frees)

  1. (Australian rules football, Gaelic football) Abbreviation of free kick.
    • 2006, [1]:
      Whether deserved or not, the free gave Cresswell the chance to cover himself in glory with a shot on goal after the siren.
  2. free transfer
  3. (hurling) The usual means of restarting play after a foul is committed, where the non-offending team restarts from where the foul was committed.
  4. (swimming) the freestyle stroke

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • feer, fere, reef

Galician

Verb

free

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of frear
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of frear

Low German

Alternative forms

  • frie (more common)

Etymology

From Middle Low German vrîe, variant of vrî, from Old Saxon frī, from Proto-Germanic *frijaz, from Proto-Indo-European *prey (new). Compare Dutch vrij, West Frisian frij, English free, German frei.

Adjective

free (comparative fre’er, superlative freest)

  1. (rather rare) free

Declension

Derived terms

  • Freeheit


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English relesen, relessen, from Old French relaisser (variant of relascher).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹɪˈliːs/
  • Rhymes: -iːs

Noun

release (countable and uncountable, plural releases)

  1. The event of setting (someone or something) free (e.g. hostages, slaves, prisoners, caged animals, hooked or stuck mechanisms).
  2. (software) The distribution of an initial or new and upgraded version of a computer software product; the distribution can be either public or private.
  3. Anything recently released or made available (as for sale).
  4. That which is released, untied or let go.
  5. (law) The giving up of a claim, especially a debt.
  6. Liberation from pain or suffering.
  7. (biochemistry) The process by which a chemical substance is set free.
  8. (phonetics, sound synthesis) The act or manner of ending a sound.
  9. (railways, historical) In the block system, a printed card conveying information and instructions to be used at intermediate sidings without telegraphic stations.
  10. A device adapted to hold or release a device or mechanism as required.
    1. A catch on a motor-starting rheostat, which automatically releases the rheostat arm and so stops the motor in case of a break in the field circuit.
    2. The catch on an electromagnetic circuit breaker for a motor, triggered in the event of an overload.
    3. The lever or button on a camera that opens the shutter to allow a photograph to be taken
  11. Orgasm.
  12. (music) A kind of bridge used in jazz music.
Compounds
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

release (third-person singular simple present releases, present participle releasing, simple past and past participle released)

  1. To let go (of); to cease to hold or contain.
  2. To make available to the public.
  3. To free or liberate; to set free.
  4. To discharge.
  5. (telephony) (of a call) To hang up.
  6. (law) To let go, as a legal claim; to discharge or relinquish a right to, as lands or tenements, by conveying to another who has some right or estate in possession, as when the person in remainder releases his right to the tenant in possession; to quit.
  7. To loosen; to relax; to remove the obligation of.
    • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
      punishments inflicted and released
  8. (soccer) To set up; to provide with a goal-scoring opportunity
  9. (biochemistry) To set free a chemical substance.
  10. (intransitive) to come out; be out.
Antonyms
  • hold
Translations

Etymology 2

re- +‎ lease

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹiːˈliːs/
  • Rhymes: -iːs

Verb

release (third-person singular simple present releases, present participle releasing, simple past and past participle released)

  1. (transitive) To lease again; to grant a new lease of; to let back.
Translations


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