frequent vs haunt what difference

what is difference between frequent and haunt

English

Etymology 1

From Old French frequent, from Latin frequens (crowded, crammed, frequent, repeated, etc.), from Proto-Indo-European *bhrek- (to cram together).

Pronunciation

  • (General American, Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɹiː.kwənt/

Adjective

frequent (comparative more frequent or frequenter, superlative most frequent or frequentest)

  1. Done or occurring often; common.
  2. Occurring at short intervals.
  3. Addicted to any course of conduct; inclined to indulge in any practice; habitual; persistent.
  4. (obsolete) Full; crowded; thronged.
    • 1603, Ben Jonson, Sejanus His Fall
      ‘Tis Caesar’s will to have a frequent senate.
  5. (obsolete) Often or commonly reported.
    • 1626, Philip Massinger, The Roman Actor
      ‘Tis frequent in the city he hath subdued / The Catti and the Daci.
Synonyms
  • regular
  • recurring
  • continual
  • steady
Antonyms
  • rare
  • uncommon
Related terms
  • frequency
  • frequently
  • infrequent
  • frequently asked question (FAQ)
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old French frequenter, from Latin frequentare (to fill, crowd, visit often, do or use often, etc.), from frequens (frequent, crowded)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fɹɪˈkwɛnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Verb

frequent (third-person singular simple present frequents, present participle frequenting, simple past and past participle frequented)

  1. (transitive) To visit often.
Derived terms
  • frequenter
  • unfrequented
Translations

Further reading

  • frequent in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • frequent in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

German

Etymology

From Latin frequens.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [fʁeˈkvɛnt]
  • Hyphenation: fre‧quent

Adjective

frequent (comparative frequenter, superlative am frequentesten)

  1. (dated or medicine) frequent

Declension

Further reading

  • “frequent” in Duden online

Old French

Adjective

frequent m (oblique and nominative feminine singular frequent or frequente)

  1. frequent; often

Declension

Descendants

  • English: frequent
  • French: fréquent


English

Alternative forms

  • hant (Scotland), haint (US, dialectal)

Etymology

From Middle English haunten (to reside, inhabit, use, employ), from Old French hanter (to inhabit, frequent, resort to), from Old Northern French hanter (to go back home, frequent), from Old Norse heimta (to bring home, fetch) or/and from Old English hāmettan (to bring home; house; cohabit with); both from Proto-Germanic *haimatjaną (to house, bring home), from Proto-Germanic *haimaz (village, home), from Proto-Indo-European *kōym- (village).

Cognate with Old English hāmettan (to provide housing to, bring home); related to Old English hām (home, village), Old French hantin (a stay, a place frequented by) from the same Germanic source. Another descendant from the French is Dutch hanteren, whence German hantieren, Swedish hantera, Danish håndtere. More at home.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hônt, IPA(key): /hɔːnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːnt
  • (some accents) enPR: hänt, IPA(key): /hɑːnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɑːnt
  • (some accents for noun definition #2) enPR: hănt, IPA(key): /hænt/
  • Rhymes: -ænt

Verb

haunt (third-person singular simple present haunts, present participle haunting, simple past and past participle haunted)

  1. (transitive) To inhabit, or visit frequently (most often used in reference to ghosts).
    • Foul spirits haunt my resting place.
    • 1713, Jonathan Swift, Imitation of Horace, Book I. Ep. VII.
      those cares that haunt the court and town
  2. (transitive) To make uneasy, restless.
  3. (transitive) To stalk, to follow
  4. (intransitive, now rare) To live habitually; to stay, to remain.
  5. (transitive, Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To accustom; habituate; make accustomed to.
  6. (transitive, Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To practise; to devote oneself to.
    • 1570, Roger Ascham, The School master
      Leave honest pleasure, and haunt no good pastime.
  7. (intransitive) To persist in staying or visiting.

Synonyms

  • (to make uneasy): nag
  • (to live habitually): live, dwell; See also Thesaurus:reside

Translations

Noun

haunt (plural haunts)

  1. A place at which one is regularly found; a habitation or hangout.
    • 1868, Louisa May Alcott, “Kitty’s Class Day”:
      Both Jack and Fletcher had graduated the year before, but still took an interest in their old haunts, and patronized the fellows who were not yet through.
    • 1984, Timothy Loughran and Natalie Angier, “Science: Striking It Rich in Wyoming,” Time, 8 Oct.:
      Wyoming has been a favorite haunt of paleontologists for the past century ever since westering pioneers reported that many vertebrate fossils were almost lying on the ground.
  2. (dialect) A ghost.
    • 1891, Mary Noailles Murfree, In the “Stranger People’s” Country, Nebraska 2005, page 93:
      Harnts don’t wander much ginerally,’ he said. ‘They hand round thar own buryin’-groun’ mainly.’
  3. A feeding place for animals.

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Utahn, unhat

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