frequent vs shop what difference

what is difference between frequent and shop

English

Etymology 1

From Old French frequent, from Latin frequens (crowded, crammed, frequent, repeated, etc.), from Proto-Indo-European *bhrek- (to cram together).

Pronunciation

  • (General American, Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɹiː.kwənt/

Adjective

frequent (comparative more frequent or frequenter, superlative most frequent or frequentest)

  1. Done or occurring often; common.
  2. Occurring at short intervals.
  3. Addicted to any course of conduct; inclined to indulge in any practice; habitual; persistent.
  4. (obsolete) Full; crowded; thronged.
    • 1603, Ben Jonson, Sejanus His Fall
      ‘Tis Caesar’s will to have a frequent senate.
  5. (obsolete) Often or commonly reported.
    • 1626, Philip Massinger, The Roman Actor
      ‘Tis frequent in the city he hath subdued / The Catti and the Daci.
Synonyms
  • regular
  • recurring
  • continual
  • steady
Antonyms
  • rare
  • uncommon
Related terms
  • frequency
  • frequently
  • infrequent
  • frequently asked question (FAQ)
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old French frequenter, from Latin frequentare (to fill, crowd, visit often, do or use often, etc.), from frequens (frequent, crowded)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fɹɪˈkwɛnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Verb

frequent (third-person singular simple present frequents, present participle frequenting, simple past and past participle frequented)

  1. (transitive) To visit often.
Derived terms
  • frequenter
  • unfrequented
Translations

Further reading

  • frequent in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • frequent in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

German

Etymology

From Latin frequens.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [fʁeˈkvɛnt]
  • Hyphenation: fre‧quent

Adjective

frequent (comparative frequenter, superlative am frequentesten)

  1. (dated or medicine) frequent

Declension

Further reading

  • “frequent” in Duden online

Old French

Adjective

frequent m (oblique and nominative feminine singular frequent or frequente)

  1. frequent; often

Declension

Descendants

  • English: frequent
  • French: fréquent


English

Etymology

From Middle English shoppe, schoppe, from Old English sċeoppa, sċoppa (shed; booth; stall; shop), from Proto-Germanic *skupp-, *skup- (barn, shed), from Proto-Indo-European *skub-, *skup- (to bend, bow, curve, vault). Cognate with Dutch schop (spade, kick), German Schuppen (shed), German Schober (barn), French échoppe (booth, shop) (< Germanic).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ʃɒp/
  • (US) enPR: shäp, IPA(key): /ʃɑp/
  • Rhymes: -ɒp

Noun

shop (countable and uncountable, plural shops)

  1. An establishment that sells goods or services to the public; originally only a physical location, but now a virtual establishment as well.
    • From shop to shop / Wandering, and littering with unfolded silks / The polished counter.
  2. A place where things are manufactured or crafted; a workshop.
  3. A large garage where vehicle mechanics work.
  4. Workplace; office. Used mainly in expressions such as shop talk, closed shop and shop floor.
  5. (figuratively, uncountable) Discussion of business or professional affairs.
  6. A variety of classes taught in junior or senior high school that teach vocational skill.
  7. An establishment where a barber or beautician works.
    a barber shop
  8. An act of shopping, especially routine shopping for food and other domestic supplies.
    This is where I do my weekly shop.

Synonyms

  • (establishment that sells goods): boutique, retail outlet, store (US); see also Thesaurus:retail store
  • (place where things are crafted): atelier, studio, workshop
  • (automobile mechanic’s workplace): garage
  • (workplace): office, place of work, workplace
  • (wood shop): carpentry, wood shop, woodwork
  • (metal shop): metal shop, metalwork

Derived terms

Related terms

  • shoppe

Descendants

Translations

Verb

shop (third-person singular simple present shops, present participle shopping, simple past and past participle shopped)

  1. (intransitive) To visit stores or shops to browse or explore merchandise, especially with the intention of buying such merchandise.
    I went shopping early before the Christmas rush.
    He’s shopping for clothes.
  2. (transitive) To purchase products from (a range or catalogue, etc.).
    Shop our new arrivals.
    • 1988, Sylvia Harney, Married beyond recognition: a humorous look at marriage (page 90)
      You fantasized about having unhurried afternoons before the baby arrived to leisurely shop your favorite boutiques. Then the first crash hits — you no longer have the money to shop your favorite boutiques.
  3. (transitive, slang, chiefly Britain) To report the criminal activities or whereabouts of someone to an authority.
    He shopped his mates in to the police.
  4. (transitive, slang, chiefly Britain) To imprison.
  5. (transitive, Internet slang) To photoshop; to digitally edit a picture or photograph.

Synonyms

  • (to report a criminal to authority): grass up (slang)

Derived terms

Descendants

Translations

Interjection

shop

  1. (dated) Used to attract the services of a shop assistant

Further reading

  • shop at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Hosp., OHPs, PHOs, Posh, Soph, hops, hosp, phos, posh, soph

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English shop.

Pronunciation

Noun

shop m (plural shops, diminutive shopje n)

  1. shop
    Synonym: winkel

Derived terms

  • koffieshop

Finnish

Etymology

Borrowed from English shop.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃop/, [ˈʃo̞p]

Noun

shop

  1. (Anglism) Alternative form of shoppi (establishment that sells goods or services to the public).

Declension

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial