fresh vs wise what difference

what is difference between fresh and wise

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɹɛʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛʃ

Etymology 1

From Middle English fressh, from Old English fersc (fresh, pure, sweet), from Proto-West Germanic *frisk (fresh), from Proto-Germanic *friskaz (fresh), from Proto-Indo-European *preysk- (fresh).

Cognate with Scots fresch (fresh), West Frisian farsk (fresh), Dutch vers (fresh), Walloon frexh (fresh), German frisch (fresh), French frais (fresh), Norwegian and Danish frisk (fresh), fersk, Icelandic ferskur (fresh), Lithuanian prėskas (unflavoured, tasteless, fresh), Russian пре́сный (présnyj, sweet, fresh, unleavened, tasteless). Doublet of fresco.

Slang sense possibly shortened form of “fresh out the pack”, 1980s routine by Grand Wizzard Theodore.

Adjective

fresh (comparative fresher, superlative freshest)

  1. Newly produced or obtained; recent.
  2. (of food) Not cooked, dried, frozen, or spoiled.
    Antonym: stale
  3. (of plant material) Still green and not dried.
  4. Invigoratingly cool and refreshing.
    Synonym: cool
  5. (of water) Without salt; not saline.
    Antonym: saline
    • a. 1628, Sir Francis Drake (?), The World Encompassed, Nicholas Bourne (publisher, 1628), page 49:
    • 1820, William Scoresby, An Account of the Arctic Regions, Archibald Constable & Co., page 230:
    • 2009, Adele Pillitteri, Maternal and Child Health Nursing, Sixth Edition, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, →ISBN, page 1557:
  6. Rested; not tired or fatigued.
    Synonym: rested
    Antonym: tired
    • Before the match, Hodgson had expressed the hope that his players would be fresh rather than rusty after an 18-day break from league commitments because of two successive postponements.
  7. In a raw or untried state; uncultured; unpracticed.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:inexperienced
  8. Youthful; florid.
  9. (slang) Good, fashionable.
    Synonyms: cool, fashionable
  10. (archaic, slang) Tipsy; drunk.
    • 1840, Parliamentary Papers (volume 9, page 43)
      How long did Mr. Crisp stay with you?—He might have stayed two hours; he stayed some time after; he drank ale and got fresh.
Derived terms
Translations

Adverb

fresh (not comparable)

  1. recently; just recently; most recently
    We are fresh out of milk.

Noun

fresh (plural freshes)

  1. A rush of water, along a river or onto the land; a flood.
    • 1834, David Crockett, A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett (Nebraska, 1987), page 21:
      They went on very well with their work until it was nigh done, when there came the second epistle to Noah’s fresh, and away went their mill, shot, lock, and barrel.
  2. A stream or spring of fresh water.
    • c. 1610-11, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act III, Scene ii[4]:
      [] And take his bottle from him. / When that’s gone, / He shall drink naught but brine, for I’ll not show him / Where the quick freshes are.
  3. The mingling of fresh water with salt in rivers or bays, as by means of a flood of fresh water flowing toward or into the sea.

Verb

fresh (third-person singular simple present freshes, present participle freshing, simple past and past participle freshed)

  1. (commercial fishing) To pack (fish) loosely on ice.
  2. To flood or dilute an area of salt water with flowing fresh water.
  3. (of wind) To become stronger.
  4. To rebore the barrel of a rifle or shotgun.
  5. To update.
  6. To freshen up.
  7. To renew.
  8. (of a dairy cow) to give birth to a calf.

References

Etymology 2

1848, US slang, probably from German frech (impudent, cheeky, insolent), from Middle High German vrech (bold, brave, lively), from Old High German freh (greedy, eager, avaricious, covetous), from Proto-Germanic *frekaz (greedy, outrageous, courageous, capable, active), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pereg- (to be quick, twitch, sprinkle, splash). Cognate with Old English frec (greedy; eager, bold, daring; dangerous) and Danish fræk (naughty). More at freak.

Adjective

fresh (comparative fresher, superlative freshest)

  1. Rude, cheeky, or inappropriate; presumptuous; disrespectful; forward.
  2. Sexually aggressive or forward; prone to caress too eagerly; overly flirtatious.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:cheeky
Derived terms
Translations

Anagrams

  • Fehrs


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /waɪz/
  • Homophones: whys, wyes, Ys, why’s
  • Rhymes: -aɪz

Etymology 1

From Middle English wis, wys, from Old English wīs (wise), from Proto-Germanic *wīsaz (wise), from Proto-Indo-European *weydstos, *weydtos, a participle form of *weyd-.

Cognate with Dutch wijs, German weise, Norwegian and Swedish vis. Compare wit.

Adjective

wise (comparative wiser or more wise, superlative wisest or most wise)

  1. Showing good judgement or the benefit of experience.
    “It is a profitable thing, if one is wise, to seem foolish” – Aeschylus
  2. (colloquial, ironic, sarcastic) Disrespectful.
  3. (colloquial) Aware, informed.
Usage notes
  • nouns that often collocate with wise: person, decision, advice, counsel, saying, adage, proverb etc.
  • even though wise is an antonym of foolish, it does not mean smart or intelligent, which is also an antonym of foolish.
Synonyms
  • See Thesaurus:wise
Antonyms
  • unwise
  • foolish
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

wise (third-person singular simple present wises, present participle wising, simple past and past participle wised)

  1. To become wise.
  2. (ergative, slang) Usually with “up”, to inform or learn.
    Mo wised him up about his situation.
    After Mo had a word with him, he wised up.

Etymology 2

From Old English wīse, from Proto-Germanic *wīsō. Cognate with Dutch wijze, German Weise, Norwegian vis, Swedish visa, vis, Italian guisa, Spanish guisa. Compare -wise.

Noun

wise (plural wises)

  1. (archaic) Way, manner, method.
    • 1481, William Caxton, The History Reynard the Fox
      In such wise that all the beasts, great and small, came to the court save Reynard the Fox.
    • 1850, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, The Burden of Nineveh, lines 2-5
      … the prize
      Dead Greece vouchsafes to living eyes, —
      Her Art for ever in fresh wise
      From hour to hour rejoicing me.
    • 1866, Algernon Swinburne, A Ballad of Life, lines 28-30
      A riven hood was pulled across his eyes;
      The token of him being upon this wise
      Made for a sign of Lust.
    • 1926, J. S. Fletcher, Sea Fog, page 308
      And within a few minutes the rest of us were on our way too, judiciously instructed by Parkapple and the Brighton official, and disposed of in two taxi-cabs, the drivers of which were ordered to convey us to Rottingdean in such wise that each set his load of humanity at different parts of the village and at the same time that the bus was due to arrive at the hotel.
    • 1925-29, Mahadev Desai (translator), M.K. Gandhi, The Story of My Experiments with Truth, Part I, chapter xviii[1]:
      Meantime a serious question came up for discussion. [] The discussion arose somewhat in this wise. The President of the Society was Mr. Hills, proprietor of the Thames Iron Works. He was a puritan. It may be said that the existence of the Society depended practically on his financial assistance. Many members of the Committee were more or less his protégés. Dr. Allinson of vegetarian fame was also a member of the Committee. He was an advocate of the then new birth control movement, and preached its methods among the working classes. Mr. Hills regarded these methods as cutting at the root of morals. He thought that the Vegetarian Society had for its object not only dietetic but also moral reform, and that a man of Dr. Allinson’s anti-puritanic views should not be allowed to remain in the Society. A motion was therefore brought for his removal.
Derived terms
  • -wise

Etymology 3

From Middle English wisen (to advise, direct), from Old English wisian (to show the way, guide, direct), from Proto-West Germanic *wīsijan, from Proto-Germanic *wīsaną, *wīsijaną (to show the way, dispense knowledge), from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (to know).

Cognate with Dutch wijzen (to indicate, point out), German weisen (to show, indicate), Danish and Norwegian Bokmål vise (to show), Norwegian Nynorsk visa (to show).

Verb

wise (third-person singular simple present wises, present participle wising, simple past and past participle wised)

  1. (dialectal) To instruct.
  2. (dialectal) To advise; induce.
  3. (dialectal) To show the way, guide.
  4. (dialectal) To direct the course of, pilot.
  5. (dialectal) To cause to turn.

Middle Dutch

Contraction

wise

  1. Contraction of wi se.

Middle English

Noun

wise

  1. Alternative form of vice

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *wīsō, *wīsaz. Cognate with Dutch wijze, German Weise, Swedish vis, Italian guisa, Spanish guisa.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈwiː.se/, [ˈwiː.ze]

Noun

wīse f

  1. way (manner)

Declension


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