fress vs gluttonise what difference

what is difference between fress and gluttonise

English

Etymology

From Yiddish פֿרעסן(fresn) or German fressen (to devour, gobble), from Middle High German vrezzen, from Old High German frezzan (to devour, eat up), from Proto-Germanic *fraetaną (to eat up), from *fra- (intensive and perfective prefix) + *etaną (to eat), equivalent to for- +‎ eat. Cognate with Old English fretan (to devour). Doublet of fret.

In German, fressen (eat) and saufen (drink) are used about non-humans, whereas the corresponding words used about human behavior are essen and trinken. “Es trinkt der Mann, es säuft das Pferd / bei manchem ist es umgekehrt” (“the man drinks, the horse gulps it down / [but] with many it’s the other way ’round”) is a common humorous couplet in German with many variations (e.g., …in Bayern ist es…)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɹɛs/

Verb

fress (third-person singular simple present fresses, present participle fressing, simple past and past participle fressed)

  1. (obsolete outside dialects, e.g. Lunenburg, Nova Scotia) to eat without restraint; eat heartily
    Synonym: pig out

Further reading

  • 2004, Lewis Poteet, South Shore Phrase Book, iUniverse (→ISBN): “along the South Shore, especially in the Shelburne area[:] fress—eat”
  • 1995, Bill Casselman, Casselman’s Canadian Words: A Comic Browse Through Words and Folk Sayings Invented by Canadians
    FRESS To eat like an animal is to fress, a verb common in the area around Lunenburg , Nova Scotia. German immigrants introduced this word, from the German fressen ‘to devour, to be gluttonous.’ Originally the verb was an intensive form  []
  • 2012, H.L. Mencken, American Language Supplement 2, Knopf (→ISBN)
    The dialect of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, which was settled by Germans in the Eighteenth Century, has been studied [] apple-snits (Ger. schnitte); lapish, insipid (Ger. láppisch); klotsy, heavy or soggy (Ger. klotzig); to fress, to eat greedily; [] shimmel, a very blond person (Ger. schimmel, a white mould), and Fassnakday, Shroove Tuesday (Ger. Fastnacht).

Anagrams

  • serfs

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /frɛsː/
    Rhymes: -ɛsː

Noun

fress n (genitive singular fress, nominative plural fress) or fress m (genitive singular fress, nominative plural fressar)

  1. tomcat

Declension

or



English

Etymology

glutton +‎ -ise

Verb

gluttonise (third-person singular simple present gluttonises, present participle gluttonising, simple past and past participle gluttonised)

  1. Alternative form of gluttonize

Anagrams

  • gluttonies

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