friction vs rubbing what difference

what is difference between friction and rubbing

English

Etymology

From Middle French friction and directly from Latin frictionem, nom. frictio (a rubbing, rubbing down). Doublet of frisson.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɹɪkʃən̩/
  • Rhymes: -ɪkʃən

Noun

friction (usually uncountable, plural frictions)

  1. The rubbing of one object or surface against another.
  2. (physics) A force that resists the relative motion or tendency to such motion of two bodies in contact.
    • 1839, Denison Olmsted, A Compendium of Astronomy Page 95
      Secondly, When a body is once in motion it will continue to move forever, unless something stops it. When a ball is struck on the surface of the earth, the friction of the earth and the resistance of the air soon stop its motion.
  3. (medicine, obsolete, countable) Massage of the body to restore circulation.
  4. (figuratively) Conflict, as between persons having dissimilar ideas or interests; clash.
  5. (China, historical) (Second Sino-Japanese War) Conflict, as between the Communists and non-Hanjian Kuomintang forces.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • frictive
  • frictional
  • frictious
  • fray
  • fricative
  • affricate
  • dentifrice

Translations

See also

  • tribology
  • lubrication

French

Etymology

From Latin frictionem, nom. frictio (a rubbing, rubbing down)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʁik.sjɔ̃/

Noun

friction f (plural frictions)

  1. friction: the rubbing, the conflict or the physics force.

Further reading

  • “friction” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Interlingua

Noun

friction (uncountable)

  1. friction


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹʌbɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌbɪŋ

Etymology 1

From Middle English rubbinge, rubbynge, equivalent to rub +‎ -ing.

Noun

rubbing (plural rubbings)

  1. An impression of an embossed or incised surface made by placing a piece of paper over it and rubbing with graphite, crayon or other coloring agent.
Translations

Etymology 2

From rub +‎ -ing.

Verb

rubbing

  1. present participle of rub

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