frill vs ruff what difference

what is difference between frill and ruff

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /fɹɪl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪl

Etymology 1

Of uncertain origin.

Noun

frill (plural frills)

  1. A strip of pleated fabric or paper used as decoration or trim.
    Synonyms: flounce, furbelow, ruffle
    • 1777, Samuel Jackson Pratt (as Courtney Melmoth), Liberal Opinions, upon Animals, Man, and Providence, London: G. Robinson and J. Bew, Volume 5, Chapter 114, p. 163,[2]
      […] one of her husband Jeffery’s shirts (with frills to the bosom) […]
  2. (figuratively) A substance or material on the edge of something, resembling such a strip of fabric.
    • 1979, Angela Carter, “The Company of Wolves” in The Bloody Chamber, Penguin, 1993,[3]
      […] the bright frills of the winter fungi on the blotched trunks of the trees;
    • 2009, Sarah Waters, The Little Stranger, London: Virago, Chapter 12,[4]
      ‘Isn’t it a shame!’ Mrs Ayres said softly, now and then pausing to brush aside a frill of snow and examine the plant beneath […]
  3. (photography) A wrinkled edge to a film.
  4. (figuratively) Something extraneous or not essential; something purely for show or effect; a luxury.
    • 1989, John Irving, A Prayer for Owen Meany, Toronto: Vintage Canada, 2009, Chapter 2, p. 91,[5]
      Torontonians clutter their brick and stone houses with too much trim, or with window trim and shutters—and they also carve their shutters with hearts or maple leaves—but the snow conceals these frills;
  5. (zoology) The relatively extensive margin seen on the back of the heads of reptiles, with either a bony support or a cartilaginous one.
    Synonym: neck frill
    • 1943, Xavier Herbert, Capricornia, New York: D. Appleton-Century, Chapter 14, p. 227,[6]
      A large admiral lizard leapt up on a rail, stood on hind legs with fore legs raised like hands and watched for a moment […], then loped down the cess-path with arms swinging and iridescent frill flying out like a cape […]
    • 1997, Richard Flanagan, The Sound of One Hand Clapping, New York: Grove Press, Chapter 54,[7]
      She reminded Bojan of a desert lizard throwing up its frill to frighten predators.
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • jabot

Verb

frill (third-person singular simple present frills, present participle frilling, simple past and past participle frilled)

  1. (transitive) To make into a frill.
  2. (intransitive) To become wrinkled.
  3. (transitive) To provide or decorate with a frill or frills; to turn back in crimped plaits.
    • 1863, Charles Dickens, Mrs. Lirriper’s Lodgings, Chapter 4, in All the Year Round, Volume 10, Extra Christmas Number, 3 December, 1863, p. 35,[8]
      Mrs. Sandham, formerly Kate Barford, is working at a baby’s frock, and asking now and then the advice of her sister, who is frilling a little cap.
Derived terms
  • friller
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old French friller.

Verb

frill (third-person singular simple present frills, present participle frilling, simple past and past participle frilled)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete, falconry) To shake or shiver as with cold (with reference to a hawk).
  2. (intransitive, obsolete, falconry) To cry (with reference to a bird of prey).
    • 1688, Randle Holme, The Academy of Armory, Chester: for the author, Book 2, Chapter 13, “Of the Voices of Birds,” p. 310,[9]
      The Eagle Frilleth, or Scriketh
      The Hawk, as Falcon, Gawshawk, and all such Birds of Prey, cryeth, peepeth, or frilleth.

References



English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɹʌf/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɹəf/
  • Rhymes: -ʌf
  • Homophones: rough, ruffe

Etymology 1

Clipping of ruffle, or possibly from rough.

Noun

ruff (plural ruffs)

  1. A circular frill or ruffle on a garment, especially a starched, fluted frill at the neck in Elizabethan and Jacobean England (1560s–1620s).
  2. Anything formed with plaits or flutings like a frill.
  3. Senses relating to animals.
    1. Philomachus pugnax (syn. Calidris pugnax), a gregarious, medium-sized wading bird of Eurasia; specifically, a male of the species which develops a distinctive ruff of feathers and ear tufts during mating season (the female is called a reeve).
    2. (ornithology) A set of lengthened or otherwise modified feathers on or around the neck of a bird.
    3. (zoology) A collar of lengthened or distinctively coloured fur on or around the neck of an animal.
  4. (engineering) A collar on a shaft or other piece to prevent endwise motion.
  5. (obsolete) An exhibition of haughtiness or pride.
  6. (obsolete) Tumultuous or wanton conduct or procedure.
Translations

Verb

ruff (third-person singular simple present ruffs, present participle ruffing, simple past and past participle ruffed)

  1. (transitive) To shape (fabric, etc.) into a ruff; to adorn (a garment, etc.) with a ruff.
  2. (transitive, falconry) Of a falcon, hawk, etc.: to hit (the prey) without fixing or grabbing hold of it.
  3. (rare, transitive) To ruffle; to disorder.
  4. (obsolete, transitive) Of a bird: to ruffle its feathers.
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To boast, to brag.
  6. (obsolete, intransitive) To speak in a loud and domineering manner; to bluster, to swagger.

Etymology 2

Possibly from rough.

Noun

ruff (plural ruffs)

  1. Alternative spelling of ruffe: a small freshwater fish of the genus Gymnocephalus; specifically the Eurasian ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernua or Gymnocephalus cernuus) which has spiny fins; the pope.
  2. Arripis georgianus, a fish found in cool waters off the southern coast of Australia; the Australian herring or tommy ruff.
  3. (obsolete) A bottom-dwelling carnivorous fish of the family Sparidae found in temperate and tropical waters; a porgy or sea bream.
Synonyms
  • (Australian herring (Arripis georgianus)): roughy
Translations

Etymology 3

From Old French roffle, rouffle (earlier romfle, ronfle), or from Italian ronfa (card game similar to whist); these words are possibly from Old French triomphe (a triumph, victory), Italian trionfo (triumph; trump card), from Latin triumphus (hymn to Bacchus; celebration, triumph), ultimately from Ancient Greek θρῐ́ᾰμβος (thríambos, hymn to Dionysius, thriambus). The verb is derived from the noun. Doublet of trump.

Verb

ruff (third-person singular simple present ruffs, present participle ruffing, simple past and past participle ruffed) (card games)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To play a trump card to a trick when unable to follow suit (that is, to play a card of the same suit as the previous or leading card). [late 16th c.]
  2. (transitive) Especially in the form ruff out: to defeat (a card, etc.) by ruffing, thus establishing the master card in the suit led.
Synonyms
  • trump
Derived terms
  • overruff
  • underruff
Translations

Noun

ruff (plural ruffs) (card games)

  1. An instance of ruffing, or an opportunity to ruff, when unable to follow suit. [late 16th c.]
  2. (obsolete) A game similar to whist and its predecessor. [late 16th c.]
Translations

Etymology 4

Onomatopoeic.

Noun

ruff (plural ruffs)

  1. (music, often military) A low, vibrating beat of a drum, quieter than a roll; a ruffle.

Verb

ruff (third-person singular simple present ruffs, present participle ruffing, simple past and past participle ruffed) (music, often military)

  1. (transitive) To beat a ruff or ruffle, as on a drum.
  2. (intransitive) Of a drum, etc.: to have a ruff or ruffle beaten on it.

Interjection

ruff

  1. The bark of a dog; arf, woof.

Etymology 5

Adjective

ruff (comparative ruffer, superlative ruffest)

  1. (colloquial) Alternative spelling of rough.

References

  • ruff at OneLook Dictionary Search

Further reading

  • ruff (bird) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • ruff (cards) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • ruff (clothing) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • ruff (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

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