fringy vs marginal what difference

what is difference between fringy and marginal

English

Alternative forms

  • fringey, fringe-y

Etymology

fringe +‎ -y

Adjective

fringy (comparative fringier, superlative fringiest)

  1. (informal) Beyond the mainstream.
  2. Adorned with fringes.

Anagrams

  • frying


English

Etymology

Borrowing from Medieval Latin marginālis.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmɑːˌdʒɪn.əl/

Adjective

marginal (not generally comparable, comparative more marginal, superlative most marginal)

  1. (not comparable) Of, relating to, or located at or near a margin or edge; also figurative usages of location and margin (edge).
    1. Written in the margin of a book.
      • 1999, R. I. Page, Introduction to English Runes, Boydell Press, page 198:
        The early pages had marginal notes most of which were lost when rats nibbled away the manuscript edges.
    2. (geography) Sharing a border; geographically adjacent.
  2. (comparable) Determined by a small margin; having a salient characteristic determined by a small margin.
    1. Of a value, or having a characteristic that is of a value, that is close to being unacceptable or leading to exclusion from a group or category.
    2. (of land) Barely productive.
    3. (politics, chiefly Britain, Australia, New Zealand, of a constituency) Subject to a change in sitting member with only a small change in voting behaviour, this usually being inferred from the small winning margin of the previous election.
      • 2002, Andrew Geddes, Jonathan Tonge, Labour′s Second Landslide: The British General Election 2001, page 79,
        In ‘battleground’ seats with the Conservatives, Liberal Democrat vote shares increased most in the most marginal seats.
      • 2007, Robert Waller, Byron Criddle, The Almanac of British Politics, page 58,
        In Outer London, Harrow East is now a more marginal Labour hold than Harrow West.
      • 2010, Nick Economou, Zareh Ghazarian, Australian Politics For Dummies, unnumbered page,
        The pendulum lists the seats from least marginal to most marginal for the government on one side, and least marginal to most marginal for the opposition on the other side.
  3. (economics, not comparable) Pertaining to changes resulting from a unit increase in production or consumption of a good.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • margin
  • marginalia

Translations

Noun

marginal (plural marginals)

  1. Something or somebody that is marginal.
    • 1990, Elizabeth B. Lee, Sociology For People: A Caring Profession (page 110)
      [] discusses those who belong to the discipline’s dominant cults, the mainliners, and their relations with the marginals and mavericks.
  2. (politics) A constituency won with a small margin.

Translations

Anagrams

  • alarming

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /məɾ.ʒiˈnal/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /mər.ʒiˈnal/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /maɾ.d͡ʒiˈnal/

Adjective

marginal (masculine and feminine plural marginals)

  1. marginal

Related terms

  • marge

Further reading

  • “marginal” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

French

Etymology

From Medieval Latin marginalis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /maʁ.ʒi.nal/
  • Homophones: marginale, marginales

Adjective

marginal (feminine singular marginale, masculine plural marginaux, feminine plural marginales)

  1. Written in the margin of a book; marginal
  2. Of, relating to, or located at a margin or an edge; marginal
  3. Outside the mainstream; fringe, fringy
  4. Of lesser importance; secondary

Derived terms

Noun

marginal m (plural marginaux)

  1. A person that chose to live on the fringes of society; dropout, misfit

Further reading

  • “marginal” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

German

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -aːl

Adjective

marginal (not comparable)

  1. marginal

Declension

Further reading

  • “marginal” in Duden online

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin marginalis

Adjective

marginal (neuter singular marginalt, definite singular and plural marginale)

  1. marginal

References

  • “marginal” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin marginalis

Adjective

marginal (neuter singular marginalt, definite singular and plural marginale)

  1. marginal

References

  • “marginal” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Etymology

From Medieval Latin marginālis.

Pronunciation

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /mɐɾ.ʒi.ˈnaɫ/
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /maɾ.ʒi.ˈnaw/
  • Hyphenation: mar‧gi‧nal

Adjective

marginal m or f (plural marginais, comparable)

  1. marginal

Noun

marginal m, f (plural marginais)

  1. someone who rejects society’s customs and laws (often referring to a criminal)

Romanian

Etymology

From French marginal.

Adjective

marginal m or n (feminine singular marginală, masculine plural marginali, feminine and neuter plural marginale)

  1. marginal

Declension


Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /maɾxiˈnal/, [maɾ.xiˈnal]

Adjective

marginal (plural marginales)

  1. marginal

Derived terms

  • callosomarginal
  • mar marginal
  • septomarginal

Related terms

  • margen

Further reading

  • “marginal” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Noun

marginal c

  1. a margin

Declension

Related terms

  • marginalisera
  • marginell

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