frisk vs frisking what difference

what is difference between frisk and frisking

English

Etymology

From Middle English frisk (lively, frisky), from Old French frisque (lively, jolly, blithe, fine, spruce, gay), of Germanic origin, perhaps from Middle Dutch frisc (fresh) or Old High German frisc (fresh), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *friskaz (fresh). Cognate with Icelandic frískur (frisky, fresh). More at fresh.

Alternative etymology derives frisk from an alteration (due to Old French fresche (fresh)) of Old French fricque, frique (smart, strong, playful, bright), from Gothic *???????????????????? (*friks, greedy, hungry), from Proto-Germanic *frekaz, *frakaz (greedy, active), from Proto-Indo-European *preg- (greedy, fierce). Cognate with Middle Dutch vrec (greedy, avaricious), German frech (insolent), Old English frec (greedy, eager, bold, daring, dangerous). More at freak.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɹɪsk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪsk

Adjective

frisk

  1. (archaic) Lively; brisk
    Synonyms: frolicsome, frisky
    • c. 1600, Joseph Hall, Satires
      Her hands must hide her mouth if she but smile; Fain would she seem all frisk and frolic still

Translations

Noun

frisk (plural frisks)

  1. A frolic; a fit of wanton gaiety; a gambol: a little playful skip or leap.
  2. The act of frisking, of searching for something by feeling someone’s body

Verb

frisk (third-person singular simple present frisks, present participle frisking, simple past and past participle frisked)

  1. To frolic, gambol, skip, dance, leap.
  2. To search somebody by feeling his or her body and clothing.

Usage notes

  • The term frisk is slightly less formal than search.

Derived terms

  • stop-and-frisk

Synonyms

  • pat down

Translations

Anagrams

  • firks

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle Low German vrisch, versch, from Proto-Germanic *friskaz, cognate with English fresh, German frisch, Dutch vers. Doublet of fersk.

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /frɛsk/, [ˈfʁæsɡ̊]

Adjective

frisk (neuter frisk or friskt, plural and definite singular attributive friske, comparative ere, superlative (predicative) friskest, superlative (attributive) friskeste)

  1. fresh
  2. cheerful, lively
  3. fit, sprightly

Related terms

  • frisk som en fisk
  • frisk som en havørn

Maltese

Etymology

Borrowed from Sicilian friscu, from Late Latin friscus, from Frankish *frisk, from Proto-Germanic *friskaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /frɪsk/

Adjective

frisk (feminine singular friska, plural friski)

  1. fresh; cool
    Minbarra l-ħalib, l-aħjar xarba għall-ulied huwa l-ilma frisk.

    Apart from milk, the best drink for children is fresh water.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Middle Low German vrisch, from Old Saxon *frisk, from Proto-Germanic *friskaz, from Proto-Indo-European *preysk-.

Adjective

frisk (neuter singular friskt, definite singular and plural friske, comparative friskere, indefinite superlative friskest, definite superlative friskeste)

  1. fresh
  2. keen (e.g. a keen wind)
  3. well, healthy
  4. refreshing
  5. cheerful (e.g. colours)
Derived terms
  • friske (verb)
  • friskhet
  • friskne

Etymology 2

Verb

frisk

  1. imperative of friske

References

  • “frisk” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle Low German vrisch, from Old Saxon *frisk, *fersk, from Proto-Germanic *friskaz, from Proto-Indo-European *preysk-. Akin to English fresh.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /frɪsk/

Adjective

frisk (neuter singular friskt, definite singular and plural friske, comparative friskare, indefinite superlative friskast, definite superlative friskaste)

  1. fresh
  2. keen (e.g. a keen wind)
  3. well, healthy
  4. refreshing
  5. cheerful (e.g. colours)

References

  • “frisk” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Saterland Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian fersk, from Proto-Germanic *friskaz. More at fresh.

Adjective

frisk

  1. fresh

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish frisker, from Middle Low German vrisch, from Old Saxon *frisk, from Proto-West Germanic *frisk, from Proto-Germanic *friskaz, from Proto-Indo-European *preysk-. Doublet of färsk and fräsch.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɪsk

Adjective

frisk (comparative friskare, superlative friskast)

  1. healthy
  2. fresh; refreshing
    friska luften

    (the) fresh air

Declension


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfɹɪskɪŋ/

Verb

frisking

  1. present participle of frisk

Noun

frisking (plural friskings)

  1. The action or motion of one who frisks; a gambol.
    • 1809, Eaton Stannard Barrett, The setting sun
      They are no longer to be amused according to custom, as a mob with the cant of a mountebank, and the leapings, friskings, gambols, and stale jests of tumblers and clowns.

Old High German

Alternative forms

  • friscing, frusking, fruscing

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

frisking m

  1. (animal) sacrificial victim

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle High German: vrischinc
    • German: Frischling

References

  1. Köbler, Gerhard, Althochdeutsches Wörterbuch, (6. Auflage) 2014

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