frolic vs lark what difference

what is difference between frolic and lark

English

Alternative forms

  • frolick

Etymology

From Dutch vrolijk (cheerful), from Middle Dutch vrolijc, from Old Dutch frōlīk, from Proto-Germanic *frawalīkaz. Compare German fröhlich (blitheful, gaily, happy, merry).

The first element, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *frawaz, is cognate with Middle English frow (hasty); the latter element, ultimately from *-līkaz, is cognate with -ly, -like.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɹɒlɪk/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɹɑlɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɒlɪk
  • Hyphenation: frol‧ic

Adjective

frolic (comparative more frolic, superlative most frolic)

  1. (now rare) Merry, joyous, full of mirth; later especially, frolicsome, sportive, full of playful mischief. [from 1530s]
    • 1645, John Milton, “L’Allegro” in Poems, London: Humphrey Moseley, p. 31,[1]
      The frolick wind that breathes the Spring,
      Zephyr with Aurora playing,
      As he met her once a Maying
      There on Beds of Violets blew,
    • 1682, Edmund Waller, “Of Love” in Poems, &c. written upon several occasions, and to several persons, London: H. Herringman, 5th edition, 1686, p. 73,[2]
      For women, born to be controul’d,
      Stoop to the forward and the bold,
      Affect the haughty and the proud,
      The gay, the frollick, and the loud.
  2. (obsolete, rare) Free; liberal; bountiful; generous.

Verb

frolic (third-person singular simple present frolics, present participle frolicking, simple past and past participle frolicked)

  1. (intransitive) To make merry; to have fun; to romp; to behave playfully and uninhibitedly. [from 1580s]
  2. (transitive, archaic) To cause to be merry.

Inflection

Derived terms

  • rollick

Translations

Noun

frolic (plural frolics)

  1. Gaiety; merriment. [from 1610s]
    • 1832-1888, Louisa May Alcott
      the annual jubilee [] filled the souls of old and young with visions of splendour, frolic and fun.
    • 2012 (original 1860), Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Marble Faun – Page 276:
      By the old-fashioned magnificence of this procession, it might worthily have included his Holiness in person, with a suite of attendant Cardinals, if those sacred dignitaries would kindly have lent their aid to heighten the frolic of the Carnival.
  2. A playful antic.
    • 1680, James Dillon, 3rd Earl of Roscommon, Art of Poetry
      He would be at his frolic once again.
  3. (obsolete, chiefly US) A social gathering.

Translations

See also

  • cavort

Related terms

  • frolicsome

References

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “frolic”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.


English

Alternative forms

  • laverock, lavrock

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: läk, IPA(key): /lɑːk/
  • (General American) enPR: lärk, IPA(key): /lɑɹk/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)k

Etymology 1

From Middle English larke, laverke, from Old English lāwerce, lǣwerce, lāuricæ, from Proto-Germanic *laiwarikǭ, *laiwazikǭ (compare dialectal West Frisian larts, Dutch leeuwerik, German Lerche), from *laiwaz (borrowed into Finnish leivo, Estonian lõo), of unknown ultimate origin with no definitive cognates outside of Germanic.

Noun

lark (plural larks)

  1. Any of various small, singing passerine birds of the family Alaudidae.
  2. Any of various similar-appearing birds, but usually ground-living, such as the meadowlark and titlark.
  3. (by extension) One who wakes early; one who is up with the larks.
    Synonyms: early bird, early riser
    Antonym: owl
Hyponyms
  • (species in Alaudidae): woodlark, skylark, magpie-lark, horned lark, sea lark, crested lark, shorelark
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

lark (third-person singular simple present larks, present participle larking, simple past and past participle larked)

  1. To catch larks (type of bird).

References

  • lark on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Alaudidae on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons
  • Alaudidae on Wikispecies.Wikispecies

Etymology 2

Origin uncertain, either

  • from a northern English dialectal term lake/laik (to play) (around 1300, from Old Norse leika (to play (as opposed to work))), with an intrusive -r- as is common in southern British dialects; or
  • a shortening of skylark (1809), sailors’ slang, “play roughly in the rigging of a ship”, because the common European larks were proverbial for high-flying; Dutch has a similar idea in speelvogel (playbird, a person of markedly playful nature).

Noun

lark (plural larks)

  1. A romp, frolic, some fun.
  2. A prank.
Synonyms
  • whim, especially in phrase on a whim, see also Thesaurus:whim
Derived terms
  • on a lark
Related terms
  • skylark (in verb sense “play”)
Translations

Verb

lark (third-person singular simple present larks, present participle larking, simple past and past participle larked)

  1. To sport, engage in harmless pranking.
    • 1855, Elizabeth Gaskell, North and South, Chapter 35,[3]
      [] the porter at the rail-road had seen a scuffle; or when he found it was likely to bring him in as a witness, then it might not have been a scuffle, only a little larking []
  2. To frolic, engage in carefree adventure.
Derived terms
  • lark about
  • lark around
Translations

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “lark”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  • Webster’s Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

Anagrams

  • Karl, Klar, Kral, klar

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