fucking vs shag what difference

what is difference between fucking and shag

English

Alternative forms

  • fuckin, fuckin’ (informal, slang)

Etymology

From fuck +‎ -ing.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfʌkɪŋ/, /ˈfʌkɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ʌkɪŋ

Verb

fucking

  1. present participle of fuck

Noun

fucking (countable and uncountable, plural fuckings)

  1. (vulgar) An act of sexual intercourse, especially one lacking passion or a feeling of sincere love.
    • c 1674, John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester, A Satyr on Charles II
      Like the French fool, that wanders up and down
      Starving his people, hazarding his crown.
      Peace is his aim, his gentleness is such,
      And love he loves, for he loves fucking much.
  2. (vulgar, figuratively) An act of mistreatment.

Synonyms

  • frig
  • frigging

Derived terms

Translations

Adjective

fucking (not comparable)

  1. (vulgar) An intensifier, often applying more to the whole utterance than to the specific word it grammatically modifies.
    Synonyms: fecking, freaking, frigging
  2. (vulgar) Offensive, annoying or worthless.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:damned

Derived terms

  • motherfucking

Descendants

  • Danish: fucking
  • Dutch: fucking
  • Swedish: fucking

Translations

Adverb

fucking (not comparable)

  1. (vulgar) Really, very; having intensive force, often applying to the whole sentence or clause.
    • 2010, Christopher Hitchens, Hitch-22, Atlantic 2011, p. 81:
      A bit young to be so cynical and so superior, you may think. My reply is that you should fucking well have been there, and felt it for yourself.

Descendants

  • Danish: fucking
  • Dutch: fucking
  • Swedish: fucking

Translations

Infix

fucking

  1. (vulgar) Alternative spelling of -fucking-, used when the word inflix is put between two words
    • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 37:
      She had been, as I say, drinking all afternoon and she suddenly howled, ‘Ten o’clock! It’s ten o’fucking clock! Why doesn’t he come? Why in God’s name doesn’t he come?’ Something along those lines.
    • 1992, Roger Waters, in Q Magazine

References

  • Jesse Sheidlower, editor (2009) The F Word, 3rd edition

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from English fucking.

Adjective

fucking (neuter fucking)

  1. (slang, vulgar) fucking, intensifier, especially to indicate annoyance.
    • 2013, Lars AP, Fucking flink, Art People (→ISBN)
      For det er helt okay at udøve den danske nationalsport nr. 1: at brokke sig. Bare man gør det på en fucking flink måde. Guerillagartnere og guerilla-strikkere.
    • 2014, Christian Frost, Gud er bare hund stavet bagfra, Art People (→ISBN)
      Det kom fra hans far, som var en fucking bøsse.
    • 2014, Caroline Kepnes, DU, Politikens Forlag (→ISBN)
      “For helvede da, Karen! Fatter du ikke et vink med en fucking vognstang?
    Synonyms: fandens, sørens, helvedes

Adverb

fucking

  1. (slang, vulgar) fucking, intensifier
    Synonym: fandens

Dutch

Alternative forms

  • fokking (homophonic modification)

Etymology

Borrowed from English fucking.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfʏ.kɪŋ/, /ˈfɑ.kɪŋ/
  • Hyphenation: fuc‧king

Adjective

fucking (not comparable)

  1. (slang, vulgar) fucking, intensifier, especially to indicate annoyance

Adverb

fucking

  1. (slang, vulgar) fucking, intensifier

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from English fucking.

Adjective

fucking (not comparable)

  1. (slang, vulgar) fucking, intensifier, especially to indicate annoyance
    Synonyms: jävla, helvetes, förbannad

Declension

No inflected forms.

Adverb

fucking (comparative mer fucking, superlative mest fucking)

  1. (slang, vulgar) fucking, intensifier
    Synonym: jävla


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃæɡ/
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Etymology 1

From Middle English *schagge, from Old English sċeacga (hair, wool), from Proto-Germanic *skaggô, *skaggiją (projection, bristly hair, stem), Proto-Germanic *skag- (to emerge, stick out, protrude), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kek-, *(s)keg- (to jump, move, hurry). Akin to Old Norse skegg (beard) (compare Danish skæg, Norwegian skjegg, Swedish skägg).

Noun

shag (countable and uncountable, plural shags)

  1. Matted material; rough massed hair, fibres etc.
  2. Coarse shredded tobacco.
  3. A type of rough carpet pile.
  4. (Britain, archaic) Bacon or fat, especially if with some remaining hair or bristles.
  5. (Britain, archaic) A roughly-cut or torn-off piece of bread or cheese.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

shag (third-person singular simple present shags, present participle shagging, simple past and past participle shagged)

  1. (transitive) To make hairy or shaggy; to roughen.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To hang in shaggy clusters.

Adjective

shag (comparative more shag, superlative most shag)

  1. (obsolete) Hairy; shaggy.

Etymology 2

Perhaps a derivative of Etymology 1, above, with reference to the bird’s shaggy crest.

Noun

shag (plural shags)

  1. Several species of sea birds in the family Phalacrocoracidae (cormorant family), especially the common shag or European shag, Phalacrocorax aristotelis, found on European and African coasts.
    • 1941, Ernestine Hill, My Love Must Wait, A&R Classics 2013, p. 7:
      He ran back and picked up a dead bird that had fallen. It was not a duck but a shag.
Hypernyms
  • sea bird
Hyponyms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English schaggen, a variant of Middle English schoggen (to shake; shake off; tremble), of uncertain origin. Perhaps a byform of Middle English schokken (to shake; move rapidly), related to Middle Low German schokken (to shake; tremble). Alternatively, perhaps ultimately from Proto-Germanic *skakkōną (to shake), specifically continuing a post-Proto-Germanic variant *skagg-, where the non-singular stem *skag- caused the analogical replacement of the stem-final voiceless geminate consonants with voiced geminates, which was then leveled throughout the paradigm.

Verb

shag (third-person singular simple present shags, present participle shagging, simple past and past participle shagged)

  1. (intransitive) To shake, wiggle around.
  2. (transitive, vulgar slang) To have sexual intercourse with.
  3. (intransitive, vulgar slang) To have sexual intercourse.
  4. (India, transitive, vulgar slang) To masturbate.
  5. To chase after; especially, to chase after and return (a ball) hit usually out of play.
  6. To perform the dance called the shag.
Synonyms
  • (to shake): jiggle, rock, tremble, wobble; see also Thesaurus:shake
  • (have sexual intercourse): bonk, go to bed with, sleep with; see also Thesaurus:copulate with
  • (to have sexual intercourse): do it, get it on, have sex; see also Thesaurus:copulate
  • (to masturbate): get it on, have sex; see also Thesaurus:masturbate
Translations

Noun

shag (plural shags)

  1. A swing dance.
  2. (slang) An act of sexual intercourse.
    • 2007, Julie Andrews, “Roman Must Die”, in The Leonard Variations: Clarion 2007 San Diego, →ISBN, page 10:
      They were in the midst of an intense snog, his tongue down her throat as he tried to work out if he wanted another shag before she left for the night, when an odd noise sounded from behind the door of 2B.
    • 2010, Clara Darling, Hot City Nights, St. Martin’s Press (2010), →ISBN, page 107:
      “And feel free to come over anytime you’d like a drink and a shag. []
    • 2011, Josephine Myles, Barging In, Samhain Publishing, Ltd. (2011), →ISBN, page 24:
      He could say yes, then just quietly leave the area without ever seeing the man again. He could even get a shag out of Charles first.
  3. (slang) A casual sexual partner.
    • 2003, Freya North, Pip, Harper (2003), →ISBN, unnumbered page:
      ‘It turned out that it was me who was just a shag to him. He had a girlfriend I didn’t know about. He presumed I was up for some no-strings action. And the thing is, I thought I was – in theory. But in practice, I realized that I wasn’t.’
    • 2008, Bruce Cooke, Trace Elements, Eternal Press (2008), →ISBN, page 56:
      “Was I just another shag to you, Trace? Someone to bed when the offer came?”
    • 2011, Wes Lee, “Saul”, in The Sleepers Almanac, No. 7 (eds. Zoe Dattner & Louise Swinn), Sleepers Publishing (2011), →ISBN, page 135:
      ‘Your favourite shag?’ I ask her.
      ‘Martin Kershen.’
      ‘He was a sexy beast.’
Synonyms
  • (act of sexual intercourse): see also Thesaurus:copulation
  • (casual sexual partner): see also Thesaurus:casual sexual partner.
Derived terms
  • shag bandit
Translations

Etymology 4

Blend of shower (bridal shower) +‎ stag (bachelor party).

Noun

shag (plural shags)

  1. (Canada, Northwestern Ontario) A fundraising dance in honour of a couple engaged to be married.
Synonyms
  • stag and doe, stag and doe party (Canada, Ontario)
  • social, wedding social (Canada, Prairies)
Translations

References

  • “shag” in the Canadian Oxford Dictionary, Second Edition, Oxford University Press, 2004.

Etymology 5

Etymology unknown

Noun

shag (plural shags)

  1. (West Country) Friend; mate; buddy.
Synonyms
  • See Thesaurus:friend

Anagrams

  • Gash, HAGS, gash, hags

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English shag.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃɛk/
  • Hyphenation: shag
  • Rhymes: -ɛk

Noun

shag m (uncountable, diminutive shagje n or sjekkie n)

  1. shag (coarse shredded tobacco)

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