fumble vs grope what difference

what is difference between fumble and grope

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfʌmbəl/
  • Rhymes: -ʌmbəl

Etymology 1

Late Middle English, from Low German fommeln or Dutch fommelen.

Or, perhaps from a Scandinavian/North Germanic source; compare Old Norse fálma, Swedish fumla, Danish fumle, German fummeln.

The ultimate origin for either could perhaps be imitative of fumbling. Or, from Proto-Indo-European *pal- (to shake, swing), see also Latin palpo (I pat, touch softly), and possibly Proto-West Germanic *fōlijan (to feel).

Verb

fumble (third-person singular simple present fumbles, present participle fumbling, simple past and past participle fumbled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To handle nervously or awkwardly.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To grope awkwardly in trying to find something
    • 1742, Henry Fielding, Joseph Andrews
      Adams now began to fumble in his pockets.}}
  3. (intransitive) To blunder uncertainly.
  4. To grope about in perplexity; to seek awkwardly.
  5. (transitive, intransitive, sports) To drop a ball or a baton etc. by accident.
  6. To handle much; to play childishly; to turn over and over.

Synonyms

  • (grope awkwardly): grubble, poke; see also Thesaurus:feel around
Translations

Noun

fumble (plural fumbles)

  1. (sports, American football, Canadian football) A ball etc. that has been dropped by accident.
Translations

Etymology 2

Blend of fool +‎ crumble.

Noun

fumble (plural fumbles)

  1. (Britain) A dessert similar to a cross between a fool and a crumble.

Further reading

  • fumble on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References



English

Etymology

From Middle English gropien, from Old English grāpian, related to grīpan (whence English gripe); compare also grip.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɡɹəʊp/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɡɹoʊp/
  • Rhymes: -əʊp

Verb

grope (third-person singular simple present gropes, present participle groping, simple past and past participle groped)

  1. (obsolete) To feel with or use the hands; to handle.
  2. To search or attempt to find something in the dark, or, as a blind person, by feeling; to move about hesitatingly, as in darkness or obscurity; to feel one’s way, as with the hands, when one can not see.
    • a. 1812. Template:wn, sermon
      to grope about a little longer among the miseries and sensualities of a worldly life
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet, Ch.4:
      Yet there was no time to be lost if I was ever to get out alive, and so I groped with my hands against the side of the grave until I made out the bottom edge of the slab, and then fell to grubbing beneath it with my fingers. But the earth, which the day before had looked light and loamy to the eye, was stiff and hard enough when one came to tackle it with naked hands, and in an hour’s time I had done little more than further weary myself and bruise my fingers.
  3. To touch (another person) closely and (especially) sexually.
  4. To intentionally and inappropriately touch another person, in such a manner as to make the contact appear accidental, for the purpose of one’s sexual gratification.
  5. (obsolete) To examine; to test; to sound.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
    • 1557, Genevan Testament (Acts xxiv)
      Felix gropeth him, thinking to have a bribe.

Synonyms

  • (to feel with the hands): touch; see also Thesaurus:feel
  • (to search by feel): fumble, glaum, root; see also Thesaurus:feel around
  • (to touch sexually): caress, feel up, touch up; see also Thesaurus:fondle

Translations

Noun

grope (plural gropes)

  1. (informal) An act of groping, especially sexually.
  2. (obsolete) an iron fitting of a medieval cart wheel

Anagrams

  • GOPer, prego

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