function vs occasion what difference

what is difference between function and occasion

English

Etymology

From Middle French function, from Old French fonction, from Latin functiō (performance, execution), from functus, perfect participle of fungor (to perform, execute, discharge).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfʌŋ(k)ʃən/, /ˈfʌŋkʃn̩/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfʌŋkʃən/, [ˈfʌŋkʃɪ̈n], [ˈfʌŋkʃn̩]
  • Hyphenation: func‧tion
  • Rhymes: -ʌŋkʃən

Noun

function (plural functions)

  1. What something does or is used for.
    Synonyms: aim, intention, purpose, role, use
  2. A professional or official position.
    Synonyms: occupation, office, part, role
  3. An official or social occasion.
    Synonyms: affair, occasion, social occasion, social function
  4. Something which is dependent on or stems from another thing; a result or concomitant.
  5. A relation where one thing is dependent on another for its existence, value, or significance.
  6. (mathematics) A relation in which each element of the domain is associated with exactly one element of the codomain.
    Synonyms: map, mapping, mathematical function, operator, transformation
    Hypernym: relation
  7. (computing) A routine that receives zero or more arguments and may return a result.
    Synonyms: procedure, routine, subprogram, subroutine, func, funct
  8. (biology) The physiological activity of an organ or body part.
  9. (chemistry) The characteristic behavior of a chemical compound.
  10. (anthropology) The role of a social practice in the continued existence of the group.

Hyponyms

  • subfunction
  • (chemistry): acidity function
  • (psychology): executive ego function
  • (signal processing): spectral density function/spectral function
  • (systems theory): control function
  • Derived terms

    Related terms

    Translations

    References

    • function on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

    Verb

    function (third-person singular simple present functions, present participle functioning, simple past and past participle functioned)

    1. (intransitive) To have a function.
      Synonyms: officiate, serve
    2. (intransitive) To carry out a function; to be in action.
      Synonyms: go, operate, run, work
      Antonym: malfunction

    Related terms

    • functional
    • dysfunction, dysfunctional

    Translations


    Middle French

    Noun

    function f (plural functions)

    1. function (what something’s intended use is)

    Descendants

    • English: function
    • French: fonction


    English

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Middle French occasion, from Old French occasiun, from Latin occasionem (accusative of occasio), noun of action from perfect passive participle occasus, from verb occido, from prefix ob- (down”, “away) + verb cado (fall).

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /əˈkeɪʒən/
    • Rhymes: -eɪʒən
    • Hyphenation: oc‧ca‧sion

    Noun

    occasion (countable and uncountable, plural occasions)

    1. A favorable opportunity; a convenient or timely chance. [from 14th c.]
      • 1690, Edmund Waller, The Maids Tragedy Alter’d
        I’ll take the occasion which he gives to bring / Him to his death.
    2. The time when something happens.
    3. An occurrence or state of affairs which causes some event or reaction; a motive or reason. [from 14th c.]
    4. Something which causes something else; a cause. [from 14th c.]
      • 1624, John Smith, Generall Historie, in Kupperman 1988, p. 130:
        it were too vile to say, and scarce to be beleeved, what we endured: but the occasion was our owne, for want of providence, industrie and government […].
    5. (obsolete) An occurrence or incident. [14th-18th c.]
    6. A particular happening; an instance or time when something occurred. [from 15th c.]
    7. Need; requirement, necessity. [from 16th c.]
      • 1650, Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living
        after we have served ourselves and our own occasions
      • 1790, Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France
        when my occasions took me into France
    8. A special event or function. [from 19th c.]
    9. A reason or excuse; a motive; a persuasion.

    Derived terms

    • occasional
    • on occasion
    • rise to the occasion

    Translations

    Verb

    occasion (third-person singular simple present occasions, present participle occasioning, simple past and past participle occasioned)

    1. (transitive) To cause; to produce; to induce
      it is seen that the mental changes are occasioned by a change of polarity

    Translations


    French

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Latin occāsiōnem (accusative of occāsiō). Compare the inherited Old French ochoison, achaison (the latter being influenced by Latin accūsātiō).

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /ɔ.ka.zjɔ̃/

    Noun

    occasion f (plural occasions)

    1. occasion, opportunity
    2. cause
    3. bargain, good deal
    4. secondhand or used item

    Derived terms

    Further reading

    • “occasion” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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