function vs part what difference

what is difference between function and part

English

Etymology

From Middle French function, from Old French fonction, from Latin functiō (performance, execution), from functus, perfect participle of fungor (to perform, execute, discharge).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfʌŋ(k)ʃən/, /ˈfʌŋkʃn̩/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfʌŋkʃən/, [ˈfʌŋkʃɪ̈n], [ˈfʌŋkʃn̩]
  • Hyphenation: func‧tion
  • Rhymes: -ʌŋkʃən

Noun

function (plural functions)

  1. What something does or is used for.
    Synonyms: aim, intention, purpose, role, use
  2. A professional or official position.
    Synonyms: occupation, office, part, role
  3. An official or social occasion.
    Synonyms: affair, occasion, social occasion, social function
  4. Something which is dependent on or stems from another thing; a result or concomitant.
  5. A relation where one thing is dependent on another for its existence, value, or significance.
  6. (mathematics) A relation in which each element of the domain is associated with exactly one element of the codomain.
    Synonyms: map, mapping, mathematical function, operator, transformation
    Hypernym: relation
  7. (computing) A routine that receives zero or more arguments and may return a result.
    Synonyms: procedure, routine, subprogram, subroutine, func, funct
  8. (biology) The physiological activity of an organ or body part.
  9. (chemistry) The characteristic behavior of a chemical compound.
  10. (anthropology) The role of a social practice in the continued existence of the group.

Hyponyms

  • subfunction
  • (chemistry): acidity function
  • (psychology): executive ego function
  • (signal processing): spectral density function/spectral function
  • (systems theory): control function
  • Derived terms

    Related terms

    Translations

    References

    • function on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

    Verb

    function (third-person singular simple present functions, present participle functioning, simple past and past participle functioned)

    1. (intransitive) To have a function.
      Synonyms: officiate, serve
    2. (intransitive) To carry out a function; to be in action.
      Synonyms: go, operate, run, work
      Antonym: malfunction

    Related terms

    • functional
    • dysfunction, dysfunctional

    Translations


    Middle French

    Noun

    function f (plural functions)

    1. function (what something’s intended use is)

    Descendants

    • English: function
    • French: fonction


    English

    Etymology

    From Middle English part, from Old English part (part) and Old French part (part); both from Latin partem, accusative of pars (piece, portion, share, side, party, faction, role, character, lot, fate, task, lesson, part, member), from Proto-Indo-European *par-, *per- (to sell, exchange). Akin to portio (a portion, part), parare (to make ready, prepare). Displaced Middle English del, dele (part) (from Old English dǣl (part, distribution) > Modern English deal (portion; amount)), Middle English dale, dole (part, portion) (from Old English dāl (portion) > Modern English dole), Middle English sliver (part, portion) (from Middle English sliven (to cut, cleave), from Old English (tō)slīfan (to split)).

    Pronunciation

    • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /pɑːt/
    • (General American) enPR: pärt, IPA(key): /pɑɹt/
    • (General Australian, General New Zealand) IPA(key): /pɐːt/
    • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)t

    Noun

    part (plural parts)

    1. A portion; a component.
      1. A fraction of a whole.
      2. A distinct element of something larger.
      3. A group inside a larger group.
      4. Share, especially of a profit.
      5. A unit of relative proportion in a mixture.
      6. 3.5 centiliters of one ingredient in a mixed drink.
      7. A section of a document.
      8. A section of land; an area of a country or other territory; region.
      9. (mathematics, dated) A factor.
      10. (US) A room in a public building, especially a courtroom.
    2. Duty; responsibility.
      1. Position or role (especially in a play).
      2. (music) The melody played or sung by a particular instrument, voice, or group of instruments or voices, within a polyphonic piece.
      3. Each of two contrasting sides of an argument, debate etc.; “hand”.
        • He that is not against us is on our part.
        • 1650, Edmund Waller, to my Lady Morton (epistle)
          Make whole kingdoms take her brother’s part.
    3. (US) The dividing line formed by combing the hair in different directions.
    4. (Judaism) In the Hebrew lunisolar calendar, a unit of time equivalent to 3⅓ seconds.
    5. A constituent of character or capacity; quality; faculty; talent; usually in the plural with a collective sense.
      • 1790, Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France
        men of considerable parts

    Synonyms

    • (action of a whole): piece, portion, component, element
    • (group within a larger group): faction, party
    • (position or role): position, role
    • (hair dividing line): parting (UK), shed, shoad/shode
    • (Hebrew calendar unit): chelek
    • See also Thesaurus:part

    Hyponyms

    • car part
    • spare part

    Holonyms

    • whole

    Derived terms

    Related terms

    Descendants

    • Japanese: パート (pāto)

    Translations

    Verb

    part (third-person singular simple present parts, present participle parting, simple past and past participle parted)

    1. (intransitive) To leave the company of.
      • 1879, Anthony Trollope, John Caldigate
        It was strange to him that a father should feel no tenderness at parting with an only son.
      • 1841, Andrew Reed, The is an Hour when I must Part [1]
        There is an hour when I must part / From all I hold most dear
      • 1860, George Eliot, Recollections of Italy
        his precious bag, which he would by no means part from
    2. To cut hair with a parting; shed.
    3. (transitive) To divide in two.
      • 1884, Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Chapter VII
        I run the canoe into a deep dent in the bank that I knowed about; I had to part the willow branches to get in; and when I made fast nobody could a seen the canoe from the outside.
    4. (intransitive) To be divided in two or separated; shed.
    5. (transitive, now rare) To divide up; to share.
      • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Luke III:
        He that hath ij. cootes, lett hym parte with hym that hath none: And he that hath meate, let him do lyke wyse.
      • They parted my raiment among them.
    6. (obsolete) To have a part or share; to partake.
      • They shall part alike.
    7. To separate or disunite; to remove from contact or contiguity; to sunder.
      • While he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried up into heaven.
    8. (obsolete) To hold apart; to stand or intervene between.
    9. To separate by a process of extraction, elimination, or secretion.
      • The liver minds his own affair, [] / And parts and strains the vital juices.
    10. (transitive, archaic) To leave; to quit.
    11. (transitive, Internet) To leave (an IRC channel).
      • 2000, “Phantom”, Re: Uhm… hi… I guess… (on newsgroup alt.support.boy-lovers)
        He parted the channel saying “SHUTUP!” [] so I queried him, asking if there was something I could do [] maybe talk [] so we did [] since then, I’ve been seeing him on IRC every day (really can’t imagine him not being on IRC anymore actually).

    Derived terms

    • part ways
    • part with

    Translations

    Adjective

    part (not comparable)

    1. Fractional; partial.
      Fred was part owner of the car.

    Translations

    Adverb

    part (not comparable)

    1. Partly; partially; fractionally.

    Derived terms

    • part-finance
    • take part

    Translations

    References

    • part on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

    Further reading

    • part at OneLook Dictionary Search
    • part in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
    • part in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

    Anagrams

    • TRAP, patr-, prat, rapt, rtPA, tarp, trap

    Catalan

    Pronunciation

    • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈpaɾt/
    • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈpart/
    • (Central, colloquial) IPA(key): /ˈpar/
    • (Alghero) IPA(key): /ˈpaɫt/
    • Rhymes: -aɾt

    Etymology 1

    From Latin partus.

    Noun

    part m (plural parts)

    1. birthing (act of giving birth)
      Synonyms: deslliurament, desocupament
    2. (figuratively) birth of an idea

    Related terms

    • parir

    Etymology 2

    From Old Occitan part, from Latin partem, accusative of pars, from Proto-Italic *partis.

    Noun

    part f (plural parts)

    1. part, portion

    Derived terms

    • a part
    • a part de

    Related terms

    • parcial
    • partir

    Etymology 3

    Borrowed from Latin Parthus (Parthia).

    Adjective

    part (feminine parta, masculine plural parts, feminine plural partes)

    1. Parthian

    Noun

    part m (plural parts, feminine parta)

    1. Parthian

    Related terms

    • Pàrtia

    Further reading

    • “part” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.
    • “part” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

    Czech

    Etymology

    Latin pars

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): [ˈpart]
    • Rhymes: -art

    Noun

    part m

    1. part (the melody played or sung by a particular instrument, voice, or group of instruments or voices, within a polyphonic piece)

    Related terms

    Further reading

    • part in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
    • part in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

    Dutch

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /pɑrt/

    Noun

    part n (plural parten, diminutive partje n)

    1. part

    Descendants

    • Negerhollands: part, partie, parti, pati

    Estonian

    Etymology

    Onomatopoetic. Cognate to Votic partti. Probably the same root as in parisema (to thud with pauses).

    Noun

    part (genitive pardi, partitive parti)

    1. duck

    Declension


    Faroese

    Noun

    part m

    1. participle accusative singular of partur
      fyri ein part – partial

    French

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /paʁ/

    Etymology 1

    From Old French part, from Latin partem, accusative of pars, from Proto-Italic *partis.

    Noun

    part f (plural parts)

    1. share
    2. portion, part, slice
    3. proportion
    Synonyms
    • partie
    Derived terms
    Related terms
    • partage
    • partager
    • partir

    Etymology 2

    Conjugated form of -ir verb partir

    Verb

    part

    1. third-person singular present indicative of partir

    Etymology 3

    From Latin partus.

    Noun

    part m (plural parts)

    1. newborn

    Further reading

    • “part” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

    Friulian

    Etymology 1

    From Latin pars, partem.

    Noun

    part f (plural parts)

    1. part

    Related terms

    • partî

    Etymology 2

    From Latin partus.

    Noun

    part m (plural parts)

    1. delivery, birth, childbirth

    See also

    • nassince

    Hungarian

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Italian, from Latin portus. Compare Italian porto (port, harbour).

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): [ˈpɒrt]
    • Hyphenation: part
    • Rhymes: -ɒrt

    Noun

    part (plural partok)

    1. shore, coast, bank, beach

    Declension

    Derived terms

    • parti
    • parttalan

    References

    Further reading

    • part in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

    Icelandic

    Noun

    part

    1. indefinite accusative singular of partur

    Ladin

    Alternative forms

    • pert

    Etymology

    From Latin pars, partem.

    Noun

    part f (plural part)

    1. part

    Related terms

    • partir
    • spartir

    Middle English

    Alternative forms

    • parde, paart, parte, perte

    Etymology

    From Old French part and Old English part, both from Latin partem, accusative singular of pars, from Proto-Italic *partis.

    Noun

    part (plural partes)

    1. part

    Descendants

    • English: part
    • Scots: pairt

    References

    • “part, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

    Swedish

    Etymology

    Ultimately borrowed from Latin pars.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /pɑːʈ/
    • Rhymes: -ɑːʈ

    Noun

    part c

    1. part, piece
    2. party (law: person), stakeholder

    Declension

    Related terms

    • partiell
    • partisk
    • partition

    Anagrams

    • prat

    Veps

    Etymology

    Borrowing from Russian парта (parta).

    Noun

    part

    1. bench

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