fundamental vs profound what difference

what is difference between fundamental and profound

English

Alternative forms

  • foundament (when used as a noun)

Etymology

From Late Latin fundamentālis, from Latin fundamentum (foundation), from fundō (to lay the foundation (of something), to found), from fundus (bottom), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰudʰmḗn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌfʌndəˈmɛntəl/
  • Hyphenation: fun‧da‧men‧tal

Noun

fundamental (plural fundamentals)

  1. (usually in the plural) A leading or primary principle, rule, law, or article, which serves as the groundwork of a system; an essential part
    one of the fundamentals of linear algebra
  2. (physics) The lowest frequency of a periodic waveform.
  3. (music) The lowest partial of a complex tone.

Translations

Adjective

fundamental (comparative more fundamental, superlative most fundamental)

  1. Pertaining to the foundation or basis; serving for the foundation.
  2. Essential, as an element, principle, or law; important; original; elementary.

Synonyms

  • groundlaying
  • See also Thesaurus:bare-bones

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • fundamental in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • fundamental in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Danish

Etymology

From fundament +‎ -al.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɔndaməntaːl/, [fɔnd̥amənˈtˢæːˀl]

Adjective

fundamental

  1. basic, fundamental

Inflection

Synonyms

  • afgørende
  • basal
  • grundliggende, grundlæggende

Derived terms

  • fundamentalisme
  • fundamentalist

Galician

Etymology

From Latin fundāmentālis.

Pronunciation

Adjective

fundamental m or f (plural fundamentais)

  1. fundamental

Further reading

  • “fundamental” in Dicionario da Real Academia Galega, Royal Galician Academy.

German

Etymology

From Latin fundāmentālis; synchronically analyzable as Fundament +‎ -al.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʊndamɛnˈtaːl/
  • Hyphenation: fun‧da‧men‧tal

Adjective

fundamental (comparative fundamentaler, superlative am fundamentalsten)

  1. fundamental

Declension

Synonyms

  • grundlegend

Derived terms

  • Fundamentalismus, Fundamentalist

Related terms

  • Fundamentalerkenntnis, Fundamentalentscheidung, Fundamentalgesetz, Fundamentalsatz

Further reading

  • “fundamental” in Duden online

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin fundamentalis

Adjective

fundamental (masculine and feminine fundamental, neuter fundamentalt, definite singular and plural fundamentale)

  1. fundamental, basic

Related terms

  • fundament

References

  • “fundamental” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “fundamental” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin fundamentalis

Adjective

fundamental (masculine and feminine fundamental, neuter fundamentalt, definite singular and plural fundamentale)

  1. fundamental, basic

Related terms

  • fundament

References

  • “fundamental” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin fundāmentālis.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˌfũ.da.mẽ.ˈtaw/, /fũ.ˌda.mẽ.ˈtaw/
  • Hyphenation: fun‧da‧men‧tal

Adjective

fundamental m or f (plural fundamentais, comparable)

  1. fundamental; essential (pertaining to the basic part or notion of something)
    Synonyms: essencial, básico

Derived terms

  • fundamentalismo
  • fundamentalista
  • fundamentalmente

Further reading

  • “fundamental” in Michaelis Dicionário Brasileiro da Língua Portuguesa.
  • “fundamental” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Romanian

Etymology

From French fondamental, from Latin fundamentalis

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌfun.da.menˈtal/

Adjective

fundamental m or n (feminine singular fundamentală, masculine plural fundamentali, feminine and neuter plural fundamentale)

  1. fundamental

Declension

Related terms

References

  • fundamental in DEX online – Dicționare ale limbii române (Dictionaries of the Romanian language)

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin fundāmentālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fundamenˈtal/, [fũn̪.d̪a.mẽn̪ˈt̪al]
  • Hyphenation: fun‧da‧men‧tal

Adjective

fundamental (plural fundamentales)

  1. fundamental

Derived terms

  • fundamentalismo
  • fundamentalista
  • fundamentalmente
  • interacción fundamental

Related terms

  • fundamentar
  • fundamento
  • fundar

Further reading

  • “fundamental” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Adjective

fundamental (not comparable)

  1. fundamental

Declension

References

  • fundamental in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)
  • fundamental in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)


English

Etymology

From Middle English profound, from Anglo-Norman profound, from Old French profont, from Latin profundus, from pro + fundus (bottom; foundation).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: prə-found′, IPA(key): /pɹəˈfaʊnd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊnd
  • Hyphenation: pro‧found

Adjective

profound (comparative more profound, superlative most profound)

  1. Descending far below the surface; opening or reaching to great depth; deep.
  2. Very deep; very serious
  3. Intellectually deep; entering far into subjects; reaching to the bottom of a matter, or of a branch of learning; thorough
  4. Characterized by intensity; deeply felt; pervading
    • 1603-1604, William Shakespeare, Measure for Measure
      How now! which of your hips has the most profound sciatica?
    • 1860, Henry Hart Milman, History of Latin Christianity : including that of the popes to the pontificate of Nicholas V.
      Of the profound corruption of this class there can be no doubt.
    • 2019, Shelina Janmohamed, Long before Shamima Begum, Muslim women were targets, in the Guardian.[1]
      It’s probably one of the reasons the Shamima Begum case is having such a profound impact; one-dimensional stereotypes about Muslim women already run so deep.
  5. Bending low, exhibiting or expressing deep humility; lowly; submissive
    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair
      And with this, and a profound bow to his patrons, the Manager retires, and the curtain rises.
    • 17th century, Brian Duppa, Holy Rules and Helps to Devotion
      What humble gestures! What profound reverence!

Translations

Noun

profound (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) The deep; the sea; the ocean.
    • 1638, George Sandys, A Paraphrase vpon the Divine Poems, Exodvs 15:
      God, in the fathomlesse profound / Hath all his choice Commanders drown’d.
  2. (obsolete) An abyss.
    • 1674, John Milton, Paradise Lost (Book II), 976-980:
      …if some other place, / From your dominion won, th’ Ethereal King / Possesses lately, thither to arrive / travel this profound. Direct my course…

Verb

profound (third-person singular simple present profounds, present participle profounding, simple past and past participle profounded)

  1. (obsolete) To cause to sink deeply; to cause to dive or penetrate far down.
  2. (obsolete) To dive deeply; to penetrate.

Related terms

  • profundicate
  • profundify
  • profundity
  • profoundness

Old French

Adjective

profound m (oblique and nominative feminine singular profounde)

  1. (late Anglo-Norman) Alternative spelling of profont

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