fur vs pelt what difference

what is difference between fur and pelt

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English furre, forre, from Anglo-Norman forre, fuerre (a case; sheath), from Frankish *fōdar, from Proto-West Germanic *fōdr, from Proto-Germanic *fōdrą (sheath) (compare Old English fōdor (sheaf), Dutch voering (lining), German Futter (lining), Gothic ???????????????? (fōdr, sheath)), from Proto-Indo-European *peh₂-, *poh₂- (to protect) (compare Lithuanian piemuō (protection), Ancient Greek πῶυ (pôu, flock), πῶμα (pôma, lid), ποιμήν (poimḗn, shepherd), Old Armenian հաւրան (hawran, herd, flock), Northern Kurdish pawan (to watch over), Sanskrit पाति (pāti, he watches, protects).

The verb is from Middle English furren, from Anglo-Norman furrer, forrer, fourrer (to line, stuff, fill), from the noun.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /fɜː(ɹ)/
    • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): [fɜ̝ː]
  • (General American) enPR: fûr, IPA(key): /fɝ/, [fɚ]
    • (US)
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(r)
  • Homophone: fir

Noun

fur (countable and uncountable, plural furs)

  1. The hairy coat of various mammal species, especially when fine, soft and thick.
  2. The hairy skin of an animal processed into clothing for humans.
    • November 17, 1716, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, letter to the Countess of Mar
      wrapped up in my furs
  3. A pelt used to make, trim or line clothing apparel.
  4. A coating, lining resembling fur in function and/or appearance.
    1. A thick pile of fabric.
    2. The soft, downy covering on the skin of a peach.
    3. The deposit formed on the interior of boilers and other vessels by hard water.
    4. The layer of epithelial debris on a tongue.
  5. (heraldry) One of several patterns or diapers used as tinctures.
  6. (hunting, uncountable) Rabbits and hares, as opposed to partridges and pheasants (called feathers).
  7. A furry; a member of the furry subculture.
  8. (vulgar, slang) Pubic hair.
  9. (vulgar, slang) Sexual attractiveness.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

fur (third-person singular simple present furs, present participle furring, simple past and past participle furred)

  1. (transitive) To cover with fur or a fur-like coating.
  2. (intransitive) To become covered with fur or a fur-like coating.
  3. (transitive, construction) To level a surface by applying furring to it.
    Synonym: fur out
Derived terms
  • furred
Translations

Etymology 2

Conjunction

fur

  1. Pronunciation spelling of for, representing African-American Vernacular English.

Preposition

fur

  1. Pronunciation spelling of for, representing African-American Vernacular English.

Anagrams

  • urf

Aromanian

Etymology 1

From Vulgar Latin fūrō, from Latin fūror. Compare Romanian fura, fur.

Alternative forms

  • furu, afur, afuru

Verb

fur (third-person singular present indicative furã, past participle furatã)

  1. I steal.

Related terms

  • furari / furare
  • furat
  • furtu

Etymology 2

From Latin fūr. Compare archaic Daco-Romanian fur.

Alternative forms

  • furu, afur, afuru

Noun

fur m (plural furi)

  1. thief, robber

Synonyms

  • furcudar, haramiu, chisãgi, caceac

Catalan

Noun

fur m (plural furs)

  1. fuero

Dalmatian

Verb

fur

  1. Alternative form of facro

Conjugation


French

Etymology

From Latin forum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fyʁ/

Noun

fur m (plural not attested)

  1. Only used in au fur et à mesure (to an equitable extent)

Further reading

  • “fur” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latin

Etymology

From Proto-Italic *fōr, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰṓr, from the root *bʰer- (to carry) (see ferō). Cognate with Ancient Greek φώρ (phṓr).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /fuːr/, [fuːɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /fur/, [fur]

Noun

fūr m or f (genitive fūris); third declension

  1. A thief

Declension

Third-declension noun.

Related terms

  • fūrtīvus (adjective)
  • furtum (noun)
  • fūrtim (adverb)
  • fūror (verb)

Descendants

  • Aromanian: fur
  • Italian: furo
  • Old Occitan:
    • Catalan: fura, furó
    • Occitan: fura
  • Romanian: fur
  • Late Latin: fūrō, fūrōnis (thief)
    • Old French: fuiron
    • Old Portuguese: foron
      • Galician: furón
      • Portuguese: furão
    • Old Spanish:
      • Spanish: hurón
  • Vulgar Latin: *furittum (petty thief)
    • Italian: furetto
    • Occitan: furet, huret, fura
    • Old French: furet, firet, furret
      • French: furet
      • Middle English: furet, ferret
        • Scots: ferret
        • English: ferret
    • Romansch: furet
    • Sicilian: furittu

References

  • fur in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fur in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • fur in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • fur in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • fur in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Old Dutch

Alternative forms

  • furi

Preposition

fur

  1. for

References

  • Altniederfränkischer Psalm 55

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fur/

Noun

fur f

  1. genitive plural of fura

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin fūr, from Proto-Italic *fōr, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰṓr, from the root *bʰer- (to carry)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [fur]

Verb

fur

  1. first-person singular present indicative of fura
  2. first-person singular present subjunctive of fura

Noun

fur m (plural furi)

  1. (archaic) thief

Synonyms

  • hoț, bandit

Related terms

  • fura
  • furt

Somali

Verb

fur

  1. open

Swedish

Alternative forms

  • fure

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʉːr/
  • Rhymes: -ʉːr

Noun

fur c (uncountable)

  1. pinewood
  2. (archaic) pine tree (in some areas chiefly about old trees)

Synonyms

  • (wood): furu
  • (tree): tall (if a distinction is made between this and “fur”, this will be used about younger trees), fura

Related terms

  • fura
  • fure
  • furu

Anagrams

  • fru

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales) IPA(key): /vɨːr/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /viːr/

Noun

fur

  1. Soft mutation of mur.

Mutation


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English pelt, from Old French pelette, diminutive of pel (a skin), from Latin pellis. Alternatively a contraction of peltry (skins) from the same Old French and Latin roots.
Norwegian pels, Norwegian belte

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɛlt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛlt

Noun

pelt (plural pelts)

  1. The skin of a beast with the hair on; a raw or undressed hide; a skin preserved with the hairy or woolly covering on it.
  2. The body of any quarry killed by a hawk.
  3. (humorous) Human skin.
    • A scabby tetter on their pelts will stick
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English pelten, pilten, pulten, perhaps from Old English *pyltan.

Verb

pelt (third-person singular simple present pelts, present participle pelting, simple past and past participle pelted)

  1. (transitive) To bombard, as with missiles.
    They pelted the attacking army with bullets.
  2. (transitive) To throw; to use as a missile.
    The children pelted apples at us.
  3. (intransitive) To rain or hail heavily.
    It’s pelting down out there!
  4. (transitive) To beat or hit, especially repeatedly.
  5. (intransitive) To move rapidly, especially in or on a conveyance.
    The boy pelted down the hill on his toboggan.
  6. (intransitive, obsolete) To throw out words.
Translations

Noun

pelt (plural pelts)

  1. A blow or stroke from something thrown.
    • 2013, Karen-Anne Stewart, Healing Rain (page 134)
      Kas is awakened by the furious pelts of rain hitting the tin roof, and he rolls over, pulling his sleeping wife tightly into his arms.

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “pelt”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • -lept, lept, lept-

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

pelt

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of pellen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of pellen

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